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GNU

GCC 10.2 Released

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Development
GNU

The GNU Compiler Collection version 10.2 has been released.

GCC 10.2 is a bug-fix release from the GCC 10 branch
containing important fixes for regressions and serious bugs in
GCC 10.1 with more than 94 bugs fixed since the previous release.

This release is available from the FTP servers listed at:

  http://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html

Please do not contact me directly regarding questions or comments
about this release.  Instead, use the resources available from
http://gcc.gnu.org.

As always, a vast number of people contributed to this GCC release
-- far too many to thank them individually!

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Also: GCC 10.2 Compiler Released With Nearly 100 Bug Fixes

GIMP: A List of Free or One-Time Payment Alternatives to Adobe Subscription Programs

People everywhere are standing up for free software

Filed under
GNU

The above is a statement from Michael Stenta, lead developer of FarmOS, and a LibrePlanet 2020 speaker. He submitted his thoughts for us to add to the "Working Together for Free Software" pages, which we have been updating as part of a summer push highlighting "free software in action." On these pages, we explore the different reasons why people dedicate their time to free software, and highlight all the different ways that user freedom is important to them.

With each submission that comes in, we realize again just how far the fight for software freedom stretches. Thankfully, like Michael and many other community members that we have spoken to recently, there are people all over the globe and in many industries, who are fighting for justice.

Right here in the Boston area, Micky Metts (also known as FreeScholar, and a member of Agaric, a worker-owned cooperative of Web developers), is working with the Boston Public School system to host an online Learning Management System (LMS), as schools will not be open for the summer, and possibly not even in the fall. Agaric is using some packages the FSF put together with Canvas as the LMS and BigBlueButton as the video chat/whiteboard. On Micky's "Working Together" page, you can find more information about the timely and relevant work that Agaric does with free software in education, immigration, and community engagement.

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The 6 Best Network Scanners for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Computer Networks facilitate the sharing of information and resources between multiple nodes linked together. It is regarded as the backbone of telecommunication in the field of technology.

The other crucial term under networks is Computer Network security. It refers to the set of rules and configurations adopted to prevent and monitor network misuse, data modification (integrity), and denial of network access and resources.

Having understood these two terms, now we can look at Network Scanning. Network scanning mainly deals with security in computer networks. It is a procedure used to identify nodes on a network, services offered by different devices, identify network security systems in place, the operating systems, protect networks from attacks, and check the overall network health.

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6 Best Free Dynamic Window Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A window manager is software that manages the windows that applications bring up. For example, when you start an application, there will be a window manager running in the background, responsible for the placement and appearance of windows.

It is important not to confuse a window manager with a desktop environment. A desktop environment typically consists of icons, windows, toolbars, folders, wallpapers, and desktop widgets. They provide a collection of libraries and applications made to operate cohesively together. A desktop environment contains its own window manager.

There are a few different types of window managers. This article focuses on dynamic window managers. A dynamic window manager is a tiling window manager where windows are tiled based on preset layouts between which the user can switch. Layouts typically have a main area and a secondary area. The main area usually shows one window, but one can also change the number of windows in this area. Its purpose is to reserve more space for the more important window(s). The secondary area shows the other windows.

Here’s our recommended free dynamic window managers. All of them are free and open source software.

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Audiocasts/Shows: BSD Now, Bad Voltage, Python Bytes and The Linux Link Tech Show (TLLTS)

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

The Best Linux Distributions for Beginners in 2020

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Traditionally, Linux was a reserve for developers, system administrators, and Enterprise users for hosting websites and other applications. There was a time when Linux posed a great deal of complexity to beginners and simply discouraged them from embracing it.

Over time, the vibrant Open source community has made enormous efforts in bringing Linux closer to the ordinary Windows and mac users by making it more user-friendly and easy to use.

Read Also: Top Linux Distributions To Look Forward To In 2020

This guide covers the best Linux distributions for beginners in 2020.

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Managing tasks with Org mode and iCalendar

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GNU
Reviews

Org mode is an Emacs mode for note-taking and project planning, though Org's workflow and file format have found adoption outside of Emacs, as we'll see. Org mode makes it easy to keep notes, maintain to-do lists, plan projects, and more in Emacs. Worg, a community site for Org, describes it as a "powerful system for organizing your complex life with simple plain-text files". This sounds rather appealing since many readers probably appreciate the power of simple text files and might agree that modern life is getting increasingly complex.

What makes Org mode interesting is that it's not merely a task manager, but a system to organize your life. Org mode can also be used to keep a variety of notes, such as ideas, quotes, a list of links, or code snippets. What I noticed is that I often jot down thoughts and ideas throughout the day as I perform a range of activities, such as working on a problem, reading articles, or interacting with others. Some of those notes might just be random observations that I want to preserve, while others may lead to specific tasks later. Keeping both notes and tasks in the same document seems natural from this perspective.

Org mode offers a rich set of features, such as folding sections (i.e. hiding information under a particular heading), keeping a time record for tasks (clocking in and out), capturing notes or tasks from within Emacs or other applications (such as a web browser or PDF viewer), maintaining tables (including support for text spreadsheets), and exporting to other formats (such as HTML, LaTeX, or Open Document Format). In terms of tasks, Org mode sports features commonly found in task managers, such as states (e.g. TODO and DONE), task dependencies (expressed via sub-tasks), priorities (e.g. [#A] for the highest priority), and tags (e.g. :@home:).

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GNU Parallel 20200722 ('Privacy Shield') released [stable] (and more GNU work)

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GNU

GNU Parallel 20200722 ('Privacy Shield') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/

No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release.

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Also: GNOME OS Is Taking Shape But Its To Serve For Testing The Desktop

Improve Internationalization Support for the Guix Data Service

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, Software Freedom Podcast, Linux Headlines

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Destination Linux 183: It Is Okay To Use Nano

    Coming up on this week’s episode of Destination Linux we’re going to discuss the age old topic, why it is okay to use Nano instead of Emacs or Vim. In the news this week were going to discuss the latest announcement from Pine64 about the new more powerful PinePhone that also comes with a USB Dock in the Convergence Package. Speaking of Convergence, we’re going to discuss what “Real” Convergence is as a response to a blog post made by Purism. Later in the show we’ll let you know about a great game deal for the Warhammer series from Humble Bundle and we’ll cover some awesome community feedback from Space (sort of) and we’ve got the beloved tips/tricks and software pick. All of this and so much more on the Destination Linux podcast!

  • Benigànim signs Open Letter +++ Interview with city of Bühl +++ New Podcast

    We just sent out a big thank you to all the people who supported us over the years and who are supporting us now. With their help we have been able to build trust and grow expertise in the last decade and to cope with troubling times introduced with the global spread of the corona virus and its dramatic effects. With your help we even have been able to raise attention that we need global solutions to tackle global problems. And we have been heard.

    Members from our community convinced public hackathons to publish their results under free licenses. International and national political fora continue to demand that contact tracing apps have to be Free Software. Many national authorities are complying with these demands. Also in the last months, administrations in Hamburg, the Netherlands and Spain committed to use and focus more on Free Software. These are the positive developments we have seen in the last months - despite the crisis - and these are the fruits of our long-term commitment and your long-term support.

    It's now time to share this good news. Let people know that Free Software matters even, or especially, in such difficult times introduced to us by the coronavirus. Use the chance yourself to order our professional promotion material, to talk with your friends, neighbours, employers or anyone else about the benefits of Free Software.

    [...]

    In our sixth Software Freedom Podcast we invited Miriam Ballhausen to talk with us about copyright enforcement. Miriam is a German lawyer who specialises in Free Software copyright questions. Together we cover the basics about Free Software licensing and discuss how Free Software copyright can be enforced, what the steps to enforce it are, and why it is often enforced in Germany. We also explore how the REUSE project could help with being in compliance with Free Software licenses.

  • 2020-07-22 | Linux Headlines

    Two new Linux ultrabooks hit the market, Google is poised to enforce usage of Android Go on low-end devices, and the 3MF Consortium joins the Linux Foundation.

From a dream to reality: How Linux changed my life

Filed under
GNU
Linux

This story is not about the money; it's about how a lower-middle-class guy overcomes obstacles and learns from failures to achieve his dream.

After completing school, everyone thinks about their college life, but for me, it was something a little different. I went to a normal private college—Haldia Institute of Technology, Haldia in West Bengal, India. I was not the best student, but computers were the subject that caught my interest.

Private colleges often have higher fees but are considered lower in educational quality with limited placement scope. During the first year of my college life, I participated in a lot of sports, which was great until I lost interest in my studies as a result. I ended up with only average grades that first year. During my second year, some seniors came into one of my classes and asked about open source; at that point, I hadn't even heard of the term yet, but I ventured an answer anyway. My classmates laughed at my obviously wrong guess but little did any of us know that experience would become the foundation of my great career.

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Linux and Linux Foundation: 5.9 Kernel and LF Edge

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  •         
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Open Hardware With Arduino: Counter and MKR ZERO

  • Keep track of your laps in the pool with this Arduino counter

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  • Recreating Rosie the Robot with a MKR ZERO

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