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GNU

Building A Custom Linux Single Board Computer Just To Play Spotify

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Housed inside a tidy little wooden enclosure of his own creation, the Spotify Box can turn any amplifier into a remote-controlled Spotify player via Spotify Connect. Pick the songs on your smartphone, and they?ll play from the Spotify Box as simple as that.

The project is based on the Allwinner V3S, a system-on-chip with a 1.2GHz ARM-Cortex-A7 core, 64MB of DDR2 RAM, and an Ethernet transceiver for good measure. There?s also a high-quality audio codec built in, making it perfect for this application. It?s thrown onto a four-layer PCB of [Evan?s] own design, and paired with a Wi-Fi and BlueTooth transceiver, RJ-45 and RCA jacks, a push-button and some LEDs. There?s also an SD card for storage.

With a custom Linux install brewed up using Buildroot, [Evan] was able to get a barebones system running Spotifyd while communicating with the network. With that done, it was as simple as hooking up the Spotify Box to an amp and grooving out to some tunes.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Manjaro 21.1.3 GNOME Edition, mintCast, LINUX Unplugged

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Better Support & Performance For OpenACC Kernels Is Coming To GCC

Filed under
Development
GNU

While the GNU Compiler Collection has supported OpenACC for a few years now as this parallel programming standard popular with GPUs/accelerators, the current implementation has been found to be inadequate for many real-world HPC workloads leveraging OpenACC. Fortunately, Siemens has been working to improve GCC's OpenACC kernels support.

GCC's existing OpenACC kernels construct has been found to be "unable to cope with many language constructs found in real HPC codes which generally leads to very bad performance." Fortunately, improvements are on the way and could potentially be mainlined in time for next year's GCC 12 stable release.

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Bash Programming

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • Bash While And Until Loop Explained With Examples - OSTechNix

    This is a continuation article in bash loop wherein the previous article we have explained about for loop. In this article, we will take a look at two more bash loops namely, while and until loop.

    The while loop is mostly used when you have to read the contents of the file and further process it. Reading and writing to a file are common operations when you write bash scripts. We will see how to read files using a while loop.

  • Bash Scripting - For Loop Explained With Examples - OSTechNix

    In Bash shell scripting, Loops are useful for automating repetitive tasks. When you have to repeat a task N number of times in your script, loops should be used. There are three types of loops supported in bash.

  • 2 Bash commands to change strings in multiple files at once | Enable Sysadmin

    Think about some situations when you need to change strings in text files in your Linux hosts.

    Depending on the case, you will simply change the file directly in your favorite text editor.

Retro TV Shows off Family Memories with Raspberry Pi

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Fascinated by the look and feel of vintage electronics, [Democracity] decided to turn an old Sony Micro TV into a digital picture frame that would cycle through old family photos in style. You?d think the modern IPS widescreen display would stick out like a sore thumb, but thanks to the clever application of a 1/16? black acrylic bezel and the original glass still installed in the front panel, the new hardware blends in exceptionally well.

Driving the new display is a Raspberry Pi 4, which might sound overkill, but considering the front-end is being provided by DAKboard through Chromium, we can understand the desire for some extra horsepower and RAM. If it were us we?d probably have gone with a less powerful board and a few Python scripts, and of course there are a few turn-key open source solutions out there, though we?ll admit that this is probably faster and easier to setup.

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Oracle's Next-Generation GNU Profiler "gprofng" Is Looking Great For Developers

Filed under
GNU

Oracle engineers have been working on "gprofng" as a next-generation GNU Profiler that can analyze production binaries. Oracle talked up Gprofng today during the GNU Tools Track as part of Linux Plumbers Conference 2021.

Gprofng stems from Oracle Developer Studio's Performance Analyzer and this new tool currently supports profiling C, C++, Java, and Scala code. Unlike the original gprof, gprofng is able to profile production binaries that do not need to be built with any special options or still have the source code available. Unmodified executable can be easily analyzed and a wealth of information provided.

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Videos/Shows: Gardiner Bryant, GhostBSD 21.09.06, and "Why Universal Linux Apps are GREAT!"

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Announcing a New Video Series: Video Editing with Linux

    When we were designing the Librem 14, we wanted it to be our dream laptop in all possible respects. This meant squeezing the most resources we could fit in there that could run coreboot and PureBoot. We settled on a tenth generation Intel i7 10710U CPU with 6 cores and 12 threads and combined with up to 64GB RAM and fast NVMe storage, we feel this is a great laptop for resource-intensive tasks like video editing.

    Instead of just telling you about it, we thought it would be useful to show you. While we could just do a high-level marketing video that demonstrated a bit of video editing on the Librem 14, we thought it would be better (and more aligned with our Social Purpose) to invest in a complete tutorial series that would teach people how to edit videos on a Librem 14 running PureOS.

    We thought who better to teach you how to edit videos in Linux than someone who does it professionally, so we partnered with Gardiner Bryant to produce a complete series. This series will cover all the major aspects of video editing from selecting video editing software through to each step in the process.

  • GhostBSD 21.09.06 Quick overview #Shorts - Invidious
  • Why Universal Linux Apps are GREAT! - Invidious

    Universal Linux Apps/Packages (Flatpaks, Snaps, AppImages) seem to get a lot of hate in the Linux community, but why?! In this video, I talk about why this type of technology is not only necessary, but a good thing.

Top 10 unique Linux distros designed especially for a small niche of users

Filed under
GNU
Linux

When most people hear about Linux distributions they most likely think of alternative operating systems to Windows or macOS , to distros like Ubuntu, Linux Mint, perhaps Arch or Fedora.

Complete systems to use on a day-to-day basis, edit documents, browse the web, consume multimedia content, etc. However, in the world of Linux what is left over are niches, and for almost any niche you can imagine there is a special distribution . These are just some of them.

It is important to clarify that all these systems are designed with one or more quite specific and determined purposes, and are far from being an alternative for those who are simply looking for a distro to use as their main system to do “normal” things.

These distros have their uses, and it ‘s nice to know of their existence in case we need something like that one day . But to replace personal use operating systems that serve for most regular operations, they do not go.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Bad Documentation, Linux in the Ham Shack, and Late Night Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Bad Documentation Doesn't Make Software Advanced! - Invidious

    Documentation is incredibly important but somehow we've got to a point where some people think that having good documentation is a bad thing or that it somehow makes the software for advanced users, I completely disagree and think if it's for advanced users the documentation is even more important.

  • LHS Episode #430: Bag of Hammers

    Welcome to the 430th episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this action-packed episode, the hosts discuss topics including the JARL Hamfest, AMSAT events going virtual, JOTA and JOTI, vulnerabilities in OpenSSL, updates to the Linux kernel, Pat, Winlink, HAMRS and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 143

    What we’d do if we were in charge of the Linux desktop, first impressions of an unusual but frustrating distro, and your feedback about Mastodon and Bodhi Linux.

If you don’t want to upgrade to Windows 11, here are some Best Linux distros to adapt

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you don’t want to upgrade to Windows 11, here are some Best Linux distros to choose, after end support of most popular Windows 7, and although there are some extraordinary measures you can take to continue using the system that give you a minimum of security, it is not recommended at all. Keep in mind that it is still possible to upgrade to Windows 10 or Windows 11 for free, but if you refuse, you also have the option of trying your luck with Linux.

Distributions abound and although the experience will never be the same as Windows 7 or Windows 10, neither better nor worse but different, and you will have to go through an adaptation process, there are some Linux distros that make this process a little easier than others.

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More in Tux Machines

Astro Pi Mk II, the New Raspberry Pi Hardware Headed to the Space Station

While Izzy and Ed are still going strong, the ESA has decided it’s about time these veteran Raspberries finally get the retirement they’re due. Set to make the journey to the ISS in December aboard a SpaceX Cargo Dragon, the new Astro Pi MK II hardware looks quite similar to the original 2015 version at first glance. But a peek inside its 6063-grade aluminium flight case reveals plenty of new and improved gear, including a Raspberry Pi 4 Model B with 8 GB RAM. The beefier hardware will no doubt be appreciated by students looking to push the envelope. While the majority of Python programs submitted to the Astro Pi program did little more than poll the current reading from the unit’s temperature or humidity sensors and scroll messages for the astronauts on the Astro Pi’s LED matrix, some of the more advanced projects were aimed at performing legitimate space research. From using the onboard camera to image the Earth and make weather predictions to attempting to map the planet’s magnetic field, code submitted from teams of older students will certainly benefit from the improved computational performance and expanded RAM of the newest Pi. As with the original Astro Pi, the ESA and the Raspberry Pi Foundation have shared plenty of technical details about these space-rated Linux boxes. After all, students are expected to develop and test their code on essentially the same hardware down here on Earth before it gets beamed up to the orbiting computers. So let’s take a quick look at the new hardware inside Astro Pi MK II, and what sort of research it should enable for students in 2022 and beyond. Read more

Debian: EasyOS, Rust, TeX Live 2021

  • nodejs compiled in OpenEmbedded

    I posted a couple of days ago about another attempt to compile Chromium. Learnt a lot from that. One thing, is that need the 'nodejs' package in the host OS.

  • Ian Jackson: Tricky compatibility issue - Rust's io::ErrorKind

    This post is about some changes recently made to Rust's ErrorKind, which aims to categorise OS errors in a portable way. [...] The Rust programming language tries to make it straightforward to write portable code. Portable error handling is always a bit tricky. One of Rust's facilities in this area is std::io::ErrorKind which is an enum which tries to categorise (and, sometimes, enumerate) OS errors. The idea is that a program can check the error kind, and handle the error accordingly. That these ErrorKinds are part of the Rust standard library means that to get this right, you don't need to delve down and get the actual underlying operating system error number, and write separate code for each platform you want to support. You can check whether the error is ErrorKind::NotFound (or whatever). Because ErrorKind is so important in many Rust APIs, some code which isn't really doing an OS call can still have to provide an ErrorKind. For this purpose, Rust provides a special category ErrorKind::Other, which doesn't correspond to any particular OS error.

  • Norbert Preining: TeX Live 2021 for Debian

    The release of TeX Live 2021 is already half a year away, but due to the delay of waiting for Debian/Bullseye release, we haven’t updated TeX Live in Debian for quite some time. But the waiting is over, today I uploaded the first packages of TeX Live 2021 to unstable.

today's howtos

  • How to Install Glances System Monitor on Linux Mint 20 - LinuxCapable

    Glances System Monitor is free, an open-source command-line tool for process monitoring, system resources such as CPU, Disk I/O, File System, Load Average, Memory, Network Interfaces and processes. Glances are built with Python language. Glances support cross-platform monitoring, which can be used in conjunction with a web-based interface. One of the excellent features Glances supports is the ability to set thresholds in the program. You can set careful, warning, and critical in the configuration file, which will then relay information in colors that can show alerts to systems resources bottlenecks, system resources issues, and much more. Glances, by default, comes with a pre-set list of colors, but you can modify and add additional configs.

  • How To Install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, OpenLDAP (lightweight directory access protocol) provides user authentication and enables you to set up user accounts that provide the user access to each computer in your network without having to set up a local user account on each computer. OpenLDAP is the free and open-source implementation of LDAP. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Add storage with LVM | Opensource.com

    Logical Volume Manager (LVM) allows for a layer of abstraction between the operating system and the hardware. Normally, your OS looks for disks (/dev/sda, /dev/sdb, and so on) and partitions within those disks (/dev/sda1, /dev/sdb1, and so on). In LVM, a virtual layer is created between the operating system and the disks. Instead of one drive holding some number of partitions, LVM creates a unified storage pool (called a Volume Group) that spans any number of physical drives (called Physical Volumes). Using the storage available in a Volume Group, LVM provides what appear to be disks and partitions to your OS. And the operating system is completely unaware that it's being "tricked."

  • Turn Your Old PC into an Access Point [Ed: Old article reposted]

    Got some older computer equipment lying around? Don’t throw away those old PCs just yet. Whether you’re cleaning out or upgrading the computers in the office or at home, you should be able to find something to do with them. As we’ll discuss, you can use them for experimentation, routing, security, file or Internet serving, and more. Use these five suggestions to make one of the projects your late-night endeavor on the weekend or your new project at work.

  • How to back up Linux apps and files on your Chromebook - TechRepublic

    If you've made the jump and installed Linux support on your Chromebook, you've probably already started installing apps and working with files and data. That being the case, you might be curious as to how you back up those apps and data. In some cases, you'll be saving data within the Linux filesystem hierarchy (and not on either your local or cloud storage, via Chrome OS. Fortunately, the Chrome OS developers thought of this, so you don't have to bother with locating that data and running commands to back it all up.

Windows 11 will be the new Vista (or Windows 8)

I've been using Windows 10 in production for about two years now - testing it since even before the official release. Early on, my impression was that it was comparable to Windows 7. Okay. Nothing too special, new or revolutionary. Over time, this impression has changed. With subsequent semi-annual releases, I encountered issues I've never had in Windows before, mostly various system errors and bugs that speak of low quality and bad design. Then, Windows 10 would occasionally undo some of my tweaks and options, wasting my time, and forcing me to tighten the screws ever more. All in all, my outlook isn't bright or happy. Bored and exhausted by the nonsense would be the best word. Now, Windows 11 is coming. As I've done many times in the past, I logged into my Insiders account and started testing, to see what awaits me. Right away, I found the experience quite dejecting. My early impression of Windows 11 Dev Build was mediocre at best, and it progressively got worse with each update. Different from Windows 10, though. What happened was, I found myself reliving 2011, when I tested Windows 8 and came to pretty much the same conclusions. To wit, this is what I think will unfold. Read more