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Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Ohio Linux Fest, GNU World Order and Extras

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GNU
Linux

Alpine 3.10.3 released

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GNU
Linux

The Alpine Linux project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of version 3.10.3 of its Alpine Linux operating system.

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Pacman 5.2 Release

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GNU
Linux

We have a clear winner. Although I’m sure that at least half of those are in responses to bugs he created! He claims it is a much smaller proportion… And a new contributor in third.

What has changed in this release? Nothing super exciting as far as I’m concerned, but check out the detailed list here.

We have completely removed support for delta packages. This was a massively underused feature, usually made updates slower for a slight saving on bandwidth, and had a massive security hole. Essentially, a malicious package database in combination with delta packages could run arbitrary commands on your system. This would be less of an issue if a certain Linux distro signed their package databases… Anyway, on balance I judged it better to remove this feature altogether. We may come back to this in the future with a different implementation, but I would not expect that any time soon. Note a similar vulnerability was found with using XferCommand to download packages, but we plugged that hole instead of removing it!

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Programming: News About GNU Compiler (GCC 10)

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Development
GNU
  • GCC 10 Switches Arm's Scheduling-Pressure Algorithm For Better Performance

    A minor optimization was merged into GCC 10 last week for benefiting those on Arm compiling their code with the GNU Compiler Collection.

    Prominent Arm toolchain developer Wilco Dijkstra of Arm has changed the default scheduling-pressure algorithm used by their back-end with GCC

  • GCC 10 Has C++20 Concepts Support In Order

    Concepts is one of the big features of the forthcoming C++20 that extends the language's templates functionality to add type-checking to templates and other compile-time validation. The existing concepts support in GCC was updated to reflect differences between the years old technical specification and the version being introduced as part of C++20.

    After review, that C++20 concepts support was merged earlier this month for GCC 10 as well as the libstdc++ updates.

Forbes Raves Upcoming Linux Desktop will enclose Windows 10 and macOS

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GNU
Linux

Forbes senior employee Jason Evangelho dedicated an entire article to an upcoming update for a Sino-domestic Linux distribution:

If you haven't paid attention to a bit of Linux desktop distribution called Deepin, it's time to put it on your radar. Remember that Huawei Deepin chose to ship on their MateBook laptop lineup. Remember that Deepin Cloud Sync (for system settings) is a great, progressive feature that every Linux distro must use. Remember that the retractable control center from the future looks like something sexy and sensible. But looking at 2020, Deepin is absolutely breathtaking.

This is without a doubt the nicest desktop environment I have ever seen … For me, the UX is more intuitive and pleasant than macOS and Windows 10. And luckily a quick setting can also transform Deepin into the traditional Windows or macOS desktop paradigm's that you are already familiar with. Hell, even the installer is a relief.

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Also: Differences between Windows and Linux operating systems. The fundamental differences that are worth knowing

[libre-riscv-dev] power pc

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
OSS

So as you know, the RISCV Foundation is seriously impeding progress. There
is huge momentum around RISCV itself, however as far as open *innovation*
is concerned, the sheer arrogance of the Foundation in failing to respect
the combination of Libre goals and business objectives has us completely
isolated from key critical resources such as the closed secret lists and
wiki.

We cannot even get access to documentation explaining how to propose new
extensions.

I have been considering for some time to reach out to MIPS and PowerPC.
Yesterday I wrote to the OpenPower Foundation and was really surprised and
delighted to hear back from Hugh Blemings, whom I worked with over 20 years
ago.

I outlined some conditions (no NDAs, open mailing lists, use of
Certification Marks and Compliance Suites) and he replied back that this
was pretty much along the lines of what they were planning.

I will have a chat with him some time, in the meantime I found the spec:

https://openpowerfoundation.org/?resource_lib=power-isa-version-3-0

It is eeenooormous, however Hugh reassures me that they want to break it
into sections.

Why would we even consider this?

The lesson from RISCV is really clear: if the ISA is set up as a cartel,
Libre innovation is not welcome.

If we had a goal to just *implement* a *pre existing* Extension, there
would be no problem.

It is the fact that we wish to implement entirely new extensions, for CPU
and GPU *and* VPU purposes, but not as a separate processor (which would be
classified as "custom") that is the "problem".

So starting at page 1146, we need to work out how to shoe horn a ton of
stuff into the ISA, as well as fit 16 bit compressed in as well.

L.

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Also: Libre RISC-V Open-Source Effort Now Looking At POWER Instead Of RISC-V

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: Destination Linux, Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, Test and Code, Pop_!OS 19.10 Run Through

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GNU
Linux

4MLinux 30.1 released.

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GNU
Linux

This is a minor (point) release in the 4MLinux STABLE channel, which comes with the Linux kernel 4.19.69. The 4MLinux Server now includes Apache 2.4.41, MariaDB 10.4.7, and PHP 7.3.9 (see this post for more details).

You can update your 4MLinux by executing the "zk update" command in your terminal (fully automatic process).

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High schoolers in charge? How one school gave up control and won

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GNU
Linux

So we chose a different way — the open source way — and as a result, we've saved our technology budget more than $1 million.

But the cost savings are just the beginning. More importantly, our decision to adopt 4,000 Linux-powered laptops empowered our students in remarkable ways.

Here at Penn Manor School District, we've gained much more by using Linux and other open source software. And by infusing open principles and practices into our learning environment alongside open technologies, we've cultivated a vibrant and inclusive learning community for all students.

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Xfce 4.16 development phase starting

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GNU
Linux

In the 4.14 cycle we tried to do a 1:1 port of what used to be our Gtk2 desktop environment, avoiding visual changes. In the 4.16 cycle we plan to harmonize the appearance of certain elements that either became inconsistent through the port or already were inconsistent before (e.g. toolbars or inline toolbars).

We will also play with client-side decorations where we feel it makes sense (for instance replacing the so-called XfceTitledDialog, that is used for all settings dialogs with a HeaderBar version). Before anyone gets too excited (both positively or negatively): It is not planned to redesign more complex applications (like Thunar) with Headerbars in 4.16. We will however try to keep the experience and looks consistent, which means gradually moving to client side decorations also with our applications (please note that client side decorations are not the same as HeaderBars!). Through this change e.g. “dark modes” in applications will look good (see the part about the Panel below).

Now before there is a shitstorm about this change I would kindly ask everyone to give us time to figure out what exactly we want to change in this cycle. Also, switching to client-side decorations alone is not a big visual departure – feel free to also dig through the client-side decorations page if you want to read/see more on this.

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Ubuntu: AMD Support, NVIDIA GPU Operator and More

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Doesn't Ship With AMD Navi / Radeon RX 5700 Support Working, But Easy To Enable

    While last week's release of Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" is new enough for Radeon RX 5700 series support with the Linux 5.3 kernel and Mesa 19.2, it doesn't actually work out-of-the-box for these Navi graphics cards. While the principal driver components of the Linux kernel and Mesa3D (for RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan) are new enough with Navi support, Ubuntu 19.10's support isn't rounded out because its linux-firmware package isn't new enough for containing the necessary Navi firmware binaries required for the open-source driver usage. So if booting a clean Ubuntu 19.10 install with Radeon RX 5700, you are likely to just see a blank screen.

  • NVIDIA GPU Operator – Simplifying AI/ML Deployments on the Canonical Platform

    Leveraging Kubernetes for AI deployments is becoming increasingly popular. Chances are if your business is involved in AI/ML with Kubernetes you are using tools like Kubeflow to reduce complexity, costs and deployment time. Or, you may be missing out! With AI/ML being the tech topics of the world, GPUs play a critical role in the space. NVIDIA, a prominent player in the GPU space is one of the top choices for most stakeholders in the field. Nvidia takes their commitment to the space a step ahead with the launch of the GPU Operator open-source project at Mobile World Congress LA.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 601

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 601 for the week of October 13th – 19th, 2019.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Ohio Linux Fest, GNU World Order and Extras

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