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Android

AndEX Puts Android Marshmallow 6.0.1 64-Bit on Your PC with GAPPS and Netflix

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Android

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton has released a new build of his Android-x86 fork AndEX that leverages Google's Android Marshmallow 6.0.1 mobile operating system for 64-bit PCs with various updates and improvements.

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PocketBeagle and Android

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Android
OSS

Linux panel PC offers IP69K protection against jet spray

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Android
GNU
Linux
Hardware

TechNexion has launched a 10.1 inch, 1280 x 800 capacitive touch panel PC that runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and offers IP69K protection.

TechNexion, which has long been a provider of COMs and SBCs based on Freescale/NXP i.MX SoCs, also sells a line of Linux- and Android-friendly i.MX6, i.MX6UL, and i.MX7 based panel PCs. The latest is a 10.1 inch TWP-1010-IMX6 model that shares many of the same features of its 15.6-inch TWP-1560-IMX6 sibling, including NXP’s i.MX6 SoC, M12 connectors, and a SUS 304 stainless steel case with an IP69K water- and dust-proofing certification.

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Also: Mongoose OS for IoT prototyping

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

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Android
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • A different approach to kernel configuration

    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet.

    Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.

  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window

    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.

  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack

    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits.
    He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

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