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Android

10 Linux or Android Based Smart Eyewear Devices

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Android
Linux

Recently, Google umbrella firm Alphabet announced a new enterprise version of the Google Glass smart eyeglasses. Over the past two years, Glass Enterprise Edition (Glass EE) has been tested at more than 50 companies including Boeing, DHL, GE, and Volkswagen, and is now more widely available via a corporate partner program.

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Mentor’s Zynq UltraScale+ eval kit includes Linux and Android 6.0

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Mentor’s “Xilinx Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC ZCU102 Evaluation Kit” offers Mentor Embedded Linux, Nucleus, Code Sourcery, a hypervisor, and an Android 6.0 BSP.

Mentor (formerly Mentor Graphics), which is now a Siemens business unit, likes to focus on supporting a few complex multicore SoC families with its embedded development tools, creating a one-stop shop for developers. For example, it offered comprehensive support with its Mentor Embedded Linux for AMD’s embedded G-Series SoCs. This month it has turned its attention to the 64-bit ARM/FPGA hybrid Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC system-on-chip.

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Snapdragon 835 neural processing SDK targets Android and Linux gizmos

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Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Neural Processing Engine SDK for the Snapdragon 835 supports Caffe, Caffe2, or TensorFlow AI frameworks on Linux or Android targets.

In May 2016, Qualcomm announced its first deep learning software development kit, called the Snapdragon Neural Processing Engine for the Snapdragon 820 system-on-chip. Now, it’s releasing a more advanced SDK for the Snapdragon 835 (APQ8098).

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What you can expect from Android O

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Android

The next version of Android, still just named "O" for now, is almost here. The Android O release candidate has just been released. And, unlike earlier Android releases, more users than ever should be able to use the new Android, thanks to Google's Project Treble.

Project Treble has redesigned Android to make it easier, faster, and cheaper for manufacturers to update devices to a new version of Android. It does this by separating the device-specific, lower-level software -- written mostly by the silicon manufacturers -- from the Android OS Framework.

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