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Android

Imagine an Android Phone Without Linux Inside

Filed under
Android
Linux
Google

Google Fuchsia first saw the light of day in the summer of 2016 as an unannounced bit of code posted on GitHub. Now, in May 2017, the word is being spread by so many tech news outlets that we don’t have room to list them all.

The Fuchsia demo app is called Armadillo, and you’re free to build it for yourself. We even found an article for you titled How to build Fuchsia Armadillo for Android in case you want to see how Fuchsia looks on your own Android phone or tablet.

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TinkerOS Android 13.11.0.4 Released

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Android
Hardware
Debian

Asus has released a new version of their TinkerOS Android distribution for the Asus Tinker Board. It’s still powered by Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow running on a 3.10.0 kernel. But unlike the previous release, Android 13.11.0.4 is not classed as a beta release. The release seems pretty stable.

The TinkerOS Android release offers a few notable improvements including some handy bug fixes. The previous Android image produced fuzzy text on some HDMI monitors. The only way to obtain sharp text was to reset the HDMI resolution after each boot. This issue is fixed in the new release. The release also fixes a volume consistent issue in the setting and notification bar.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Google has a new way to call out poorly made Android apps

    Google's plan to improve the Android experience involves more than just tweaking the operating system. It also requires developers to up the quality of their work, and now Google has a new way to warn app creators whose work isn't up to snuff. Long story short, if your app ranks in the bottom 25 percent when it comes to certain stability, battery or rendering metrics, you'll be hearing from the search giant through the developer console.

  • Android Go is NOT a replacement for Android One

    The current specs race and the bid to have computing power in our smartphones that is vastly superior to that in most of computers has proven to be a necessity when it comes to Android smartphones. For flagship devices, this is not a major problem as the large cost of the device means OEMs can afford to add expensive components, but what about for the super low-cost devices?

  • Google making cheap Android phones support its latest software

    Google is making another go at getting cheap Android phones to support its latest software, an attempt to lock more consumers in the developing world into the internet giant’s services.

    The new program, called Android Go, was announced at the Alphabet Inc. division’s I/O developer conference on Wednesday in Mountain View, California. It bakes features directly into Google’s mobile operating system that are designed specifically for cheap phones, including software to manage cellular data costs. The service will launch in 2018.

  • Shadow Warrior finally makes the jump from PC to Android

    In 1997, 3D Realms, the development team behind Duke Nukem 3D, released Shadow Warrior for the PC. It remains one of the best first person shooters ever made, and now you can finally play it on your Android smartphone or tablet for just $2.99, thanks to publisher Devolver Digital and the game’s Android developer, General Arcade.

  • Does Android Wear Have a Future?

    I remember the precise moment I understood smartwatches. I had been using a massive Samsung phablet for a week, trying to understand how people were using these relatively new devices. When it buzzed in my pocket, I thought "I wish I could look at a smaller screen."

  • 10 new Android O features that will make your phone better

    Though we got out first peek at Android O back in March, Google finally revealed more details this week at its I/O developers conference about the soon-to-drop version of Android.

    Though we're still quite a ways away from the official release, we now a lot more about the update. At first glance, many of the new changes are subtle, building on updates Google introduced last year with Nougat. (Yes, it's another boring year for Android.)

Android Leftovers

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Android
  • 14 new features in Android O you need to know about

    Android O is currently available to developers and those brave enough to take part in the public beta.

    Keep in mind as you go through these slides, features often change during development. So things may look different this fall when Android O gets a proper name and release. But until then, the following are features you can expect when Android O hits your device.

  • Android O’s most exciting new feature is a total game-changer

    Of all the current phones that are going to be updated to Android O after Google releases the new operating system, only the Pixel will take advantage of Project Treble. What that actually means is that Google might update the phone even after the mandatory two-year period for software updates expires.

  • Android O latest rumours - name, release date, features & public beta
  • Android to Add Kotlin Programming Language Support

    Today, at the Google I/O keynote, the Android team announced first-class support for Kotlin. [...] Starting now, Android Studio 3.0 ships with Kotlin out of the box

  • ICC Examin 1.0 on Android

    ICC Examin allows since version 1.0 ICC Color Profile viewing on the Android mobile platform. ICC Examin shows ICC color profile elements graphically. This way it is much easier to understand the content. Color primaries, white point, curves, tables and color lists are displayed both numerically and as graphics. Matrices, international texts, Metadata are much easier to read.

  • What Fuchsia could mean for Android

    Google has never been one to settle or to do things in a way that is not decidedly "Google". So it should have come as no surprise to anyone that they began working on a project that had many scratching their heads. The project is called Fuschia and most people that follow Google and Android closely, know of this new platform.

  • Project Treble is the most important Android update you've never heard of

    “This time, things will be different,” or so Google says with each major dessert-flavored Android release that it pushes to phones and tablets. But looking at Android Marshmallow and Android Nougat over the past two years proves that’s not entirely true.

  • Android Automotive hands-on: Google is finally ready to talk about its car OS

    After years of rumors and speculation, Google finally announced a plan to put a Google-blessed, car version of Android in a production vehicle. Audi and Volvo have both signed up to have their "next gen" vehicles powered by Google's OS. Previously we've seen "concept" Android-as-a-car-OS displays from Google in the form of a "stock Android" car OS in a Maserati and an FCA/Google concept for a "skinned android" infotainment system. With Audi and Volvo, the "concepts" are over, and we're finally seeing a work-in-progress product that will actually make it to market. And while previous concepts were quietly shown off with no one willing to comment, Google finally seems ready to talk about how Android in the car will work.

  • Android Circuit: Latest Pixel 2 Specs Leak, Samsung Note 8 Details, Google Invades Your iPhone

Android Leftovers

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Android

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Android Domination and Android O

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Android
  • Android now has more than two billion active users

    It doesn't come as a surprise, though, as Android's share of the mobile market continues to grow, and claimed a record 88 per cent of the global market back in November 2016. iOS, meanwhile, bagged just 12.1 per cent of the market.

  • Android O is shaping up to be exactly what Android needs

    Today’s Google I/O presentation was as wide-ranging as the company’s various ventures into future technology, though the biggest cheers of excitement were inevitably reserved for Android. I just got my first taste of Google’s next iteration, codenamed Android O, and it looks like it’s targeting exactly the areas where Google’s mobile OS needed improvement.

  • Android O Beta: Our first take

    Whatever Google ends up calling it, the Mountain View, California, company is prepping its next major Android release: Android O. On March 21, it made everything official except the name.

Fedora 27 Workstation Linux Could Let You Share Printers from Android Devices

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Android
Linux
Red Hat

Red Hat's Jiří Eischmann is informing the Fedora Linux community today about the upcoming availability of some long-anticipated printing improvements to the Workstation edition of the operating system.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Nextcloud 12 Officially Released, Adds New Architecture for Massive Scalability
    Nextcloud informs Softpedia today about the official availability of the final release of Nextcloud 12, a major milestone of the self-hosting cloud server technology that introduces numerous new features and improvements. The biggest new feature of the Nextcloud 12 release appears to be the introduction of a new architecture for massive scalability, called Global Scale, which is a next-generation open-source technology for syncing and sharing files. Global Scale increases scalability from tens of thousands of users to hundreds of millions on a single instance, while helping universities and other institutions significantly reduce the costs of their existing large installations.
  • ReactOS 0.4.5 Open-Source Windows-Compatible OS Launches with Many Improvements
    ReactOS 0.4.5 is a maintenance update that adds numerous changes and improvements over the previous point release. The kernel has been updated in this version to improve the FreeLoader and UEFI booting, as well as the Plug and Play modules, adding support for more computers to boot ReactOS without issues.
  • Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs
    AT&T has been the headliner in the carrier race to software defined networking (SDN) and network function virtualization (NFV). But Sprint is putting its own stamp on the space this week with its debut of a new open source SDN/NFV mobile core solution.
  • Google’s New Home for All Things Open Source Runs Deep
    Google is not only one of the biggest contributors to the open source community but also has a strong track record of delivering open source tools and platforms that give birth to robust technology ecosystems. Just witness the momentum that Android and Kubernetes now have. Recently, Google launched a new home for its open source projects, processes, and initiatives. The site runs deep and has several avenues worth investigating. Here is a tour and some highlights worth noting.
  • Making your first open source contribution
  • Simplify expense reports with Smart Receipts
    The app is called Smart Receipts, it's licensed AGPL 3.0, and the source code is available on GitHub for Android and iOS.
  • How the TensorFlow team handles open source support
    Open-sourcing is more than throwing code over the wall and hoping somebody uses it. I knew this in theory, but being part of the TensorFlow team at Google has opened my eyes to how many different elements you need to build a community around a piece of software.
  • IRC for the 21st Century: Introducing Riot
    Internet relay chat (IRC) is one of the oldest chat protocols around and still popular in many open source communities. IRC's best strengths are as a decentralized and open communication method, making it easy for anyone to participate by running a network of their own. There are also a variety of clients and bots available for IRC.

Tizen News: Phones and TVs

  • Tizen 3.0-powered Samsung Z4 now available with offline retailers in india
    The Samsung Z4, the fourth smartphone in Samsung’s Z series and a successor to the Z2 (and not the Z3, as many would assume), has been formally announced and made an appearance at the Tizen Developer Conference (TDC 2017) this past week. The Z4 was rumoured to make its way to India on May 19th (Friday) and it did – arriving with offline retailers after launching in the country last Monday (one week ago).
  • Samsung 2017 QLED TVs World First to support autocalibration for HDR
  • Samsung approves You.i TV video platform for Tizen TV app development
    While Samsung has developed Tizen TV apps using JavaScript, You.i TV’s Engine Video app runs on Native Client (NACL), a web technology that does not only allows C++ applications to run in a standard browser but is said to be 24 times faster than JavaScript. Now that Samsung has approved You.i TV’s video engine platform, developers can craft more video content for Tizen Smart TV owners.
  • Samsung Smart TV gets a new Glympse app that enables location sharing on the TV
    Samsung Smart TV, powered by the intuitive, self-developed Tizen operating system, has gotten a cool new app which enables consumers to view the location of their friends, loved ones or even a pizza delivery or cable technician in real-time directly from their home’s largest screen. The new app is developed by Glympse, the leading real-time location services platform.

How To Encrypt DNS Traffic In Linux Using DNSCrypt

​Dnscrypt is a protocol that is used to improve DNS security by authenticating communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver. DNSCrypt prevents DNS spoofing. It uses cryptographic signatures to verify that responses originate from the chosen DNS resolver and haven’t been tampered with. DNSCrypt is available for multi-platforms including Windows, MacOS, Unix, Android, iOS, Linux and even routers. Read
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Debian-Based Untangle 13.0 Linux Firewall Tackles Bufferbloat, Adds New Features

Untangle NG Firewall, the open-source and powerful Debian-based network security platform featuring pluggable modules for network apps, has been updated to version 13.0, a major release adding new features and numerous improvements. The biggest improvement brought by the Untangle NG Firewall 13.0 release is to the poor latency generated by excess buffering in networking equipment, called bufferbloat, by supporting a queueing algorithm designed to optimize QoS and bandwidth to enforce a controlled delay. Read more