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Android

Android Leftovers

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Android

Xiaomi Mi Box review: A great entry point for Android TV and 4K streaming

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Android
Reviews

When Android TV was introduced to the world back in 2014, the new TV-focused operating system wasn’t packaged as a new entertainment platform as such, but more of an upgrade to its old (failed) Google TV initiative. It sought to bring cohesion to Android content across devices.

“We’re simply giving TVs the same level of attention phones and tablets have had,” explained Android director of engineering David Singleton at the launch.

Over the past couple of years, Android TV has arrived on a number of smart TVs and set-top boxes — including the now-discontinued Google Nexus Player — as Google strives to ensure its presence extends beyond your mobile devices into the centerpiece of your living room.

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First 64-bit Orange Pi slips in under $20

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Android
Linux

The open spec Orange Pi PC 2 runs Linux or Android on a quad-core -A53 Allwinner H5 SoC, and offers GbE, a 40-pin RPi interface, and three USB host ports.

Shenzhen Xunlong is keeping up its prolific pace in spinning off new Allwinner SoCs into open source SBCs, and now it has released its first 64-bit ARM model, and one of the cheapest quad-core -A53 boards around. The Orange Pi PC 2 runs Linux or Android on a new Allwinner H5 SoC featuring four Cortex-A53 cores and a more powerful Mali-450 GPU.

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Turn That Old Tablet Into A Sub-$100 Linux Laptop

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Android
GNU
Linux

Tiny laptops have always been devices that promise so much, yet fail somehow to deliver. From the Atari Portfolio palmtops through to the recent crop of netbooks they have been either eye-wateringly expensive if they are any good, or so compromised by their size constraints as to be next-to-useless. We’ve seen DOS, EPOC, Windows, WinCE, Palm OS, Linux distros and more in tiny form factors over the years, yet few have made a significant mark.

The prospect of a “proper” computer in your hand isn’t something to abandon just yet though. We are now reaching the point at which the previous generation of higher-end Android tablets are both acceptably powerful and sufficiently numerous as to be available at a very reasonable price. Perhaps these can provide the tiny laptop seeker with a basis for something useful. [NODE] certainly thinks so, because he’s produced a nice little Ubuntu laptop using a second-hand Nexus 7 tablet and a Bluetooth keyboard case. Android is replaced with an Ubuntu image, and a cardboard cut-out display bezel is held in place with magnetic strips. A step-by-step guide has been put up to help others interested in following the same path.

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Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
  • Android device updates: Nvidia Shield Tablet and K1 version get several key bug fixes

    There’s no Nougat to be had this week for your Android device, but Shield Tablet users are getting some important patches that should improve their overall use and gaming experience.

    There’s also a strange case of missing Android dashboard numbers and hints the Galaxy S7 Edge may be on track for Nougat.

    Each week, we round up all the major software updates to hit the Android ecosystem, including phones and tablets on U.S. carriers, unlocked phones, smartwatches, and Android TV devices. Making sure your device is running the latest available software is a good housekeeping practice, ensuring you have the latest features with fewer bugs and security holes.

  • Porsche Design Huawei Mate 9 hands on: the dream machine

    What happens when a luxury car manufacturer teams up with a Chinese smartphone maker? You get a phone that’s both very sexy and awfully familiar. Huawei and Porsche Design teamed up to produce a phone that is as desirable as it is expensive. The result is the Porsche Design Mate 9 and if its looks don’t knock your socks off, its price will. Join us for a quick unboxing and first impressions of the Porsche Design Huawei Mate 9.

  • Indus, the startup building an Android OS for India, targets deals with Chinese OEMs

    Indus OS, the startup developing a localized version of Android for India, is now going after international OEMs after it clinched a deal that will local giant Intex sell smartphones powered by its operating system.

    Intex has around 10 percent of sales in India, according to data from Counterpoint Research, so landing the firm as a partner will boost Indus’ coverage of India’s mobile landscape. The partnership also means that Indus has now struck deals with nearly all of India’s top phone brands — including Micromax, Karbonn, Celkon and Swipe but not Lava — meaning it can now focus its attention to the many overseas firms vying for marketshare in India, one of the few regions to buck the global trend of slowing phone sales.

  • Android has captured a record-high share of the smartphone market
  • Google Ends Support for Eclipse Android Developer Tools
  • Sprint will support next-gen texting on Android next year
  • Daily Briefing: Going out in a blaze of glory

Linux/Android module offers embedded version of Snapdragon 410

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Android
Linux

The Inforce 6301 COM expands upon the Snapdragon 410 and new 410E, and offers 1GB RAM, 8GB eMMC, WiFi, BT, and GPS for $85, plus $100 for the carrier.

Inforce Computing announced its most affordable “Micro SOM” computer-on-module yet with an $85 Inforce 6301 that runs Android or Linaro’s version of Ubuntu Linux on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 410 or recently launched 410E embedded version. The industrial temperature resistant module can be bought as part of a $185 starter kit (see farther below).

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Linux Devices

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • Mentor Graphics Expands Mentor Embedded Linux Support for the latest AMD Embedded G-series Family of Processors
  • First Apollo Lake Nano-ITX SBC emerges

    Portwell unveiled a Nano-ITX SBC and COM Express Compact module with dual or quad-core Atom E3900 SoCs, -40 to 85°C support, and up to 32GB on the COM.

    Portwell has announced both a Nano-6062 Nano-ITX single board computer and a PCOM-B641VG COM Express Compact Type 6 module built around Intel’s new Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” SoCs. Both products offer standard -40 to 85°C industrial temperature support. No OS is listed, but other Apollo Lake based products have all supported Linux, Windows, and usually VxWorks.

  • VoCore2: Another Tiny, Inexpensive Linux Device Debuts

    While the Raspberry Pi has grabbed the most headlines as a tiny, ultra-inexpensive, pocketable computer running an open source operating system, it's actually only one of many tiny LInux computers being heralded as part of a new "Linux punk ethic." As we've noted, there are various pocket-size Android devices selling online for under $100 (see the photo).

    Now, one of the most interesting entries in this space has debuted. VoCore2 is an open source Linux computer and wireless router that is actually smaller than a coin. You can use it as a VPN gateway, or as a private cloud platform. Here are more details.

  • Meet Remix IO+, a More Powerful Remix IO That Doubles as an Android or Gaming PC

    We reported a couple of weeks ago about an upcoming device from the developers of the Android-x86-based Remix OS operating system for PCs and embedded devices, dubbed Remix IO.

    Remix IO launched its Kickstarter campaign on October 20, 2016, with a pledged goal of $250,000 USD, which now strides towards $500,000 USD with 15 days to go, at the moment of writing this article, thanks to over 4,100 backers. And now, Jide Technology is proud to announce a new product tier, Remix IO+.

MaruOS 0.3 released (Android 6.0 smartphone ROM which also includes Debian Linux desktop OS)

Filed under
Android
Debian

Maru OS is an operating system that lets you run Android software on your phone… and connect the same phone to an external display to run desktop Linux software.

An early build was unveiled in February. This summer the developer open sourced the project. And now there’s an updated version that makes the move from Android 5.1 to Android 6.0.

Maru OS 0.3 is ready to go… assuming you have a Google Nexus 5.

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Also: Debian Fun in October 2016

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • OpenMake Software turns its ARA solution into open-source offering
    OpenMake Software wants to improve how developers use the Continuous Delivery pipeline with its recently open-sourced Application Release Automation (ARA) solution, Release Engineer, which is based on version 7.7 of the ARA solution and offered under the FreeBSD license.
  • Open source needs social freedoms for business to thrive
    When open source was first introduced in 1991 with Linux, it was considered a novelty in the industry, a new toy for developers to play with. Today, it’s a fundamental driver of technology innovation across all software companies, according to Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief open source officer at VMware Inc. “Open source is more than software development methodology; open source is how a group of people interact and how you create fantastic technology,” said Hohndel.
  • Facing down copyright claims, Doom roguelike fan game goes open-source (correction)
  • Doom-inspired roguelike goes open-source in a bid to outrun Zenimax lawyers
    Last week news broke that Zenimax is threatening legal action against the developer of DoomRL, a free Doom-inspired roguelike. Now, DoomRL's creator is open-sourcing it in an attempt to put it beyond the reach of Zenimax's legal team. Many devs will probably appreciate the symbolic resonance of this move, given that id Software open-sourced the original Doom code almost twenty years ago.
  • 6 organizational growing pains you can avoid
    Everything has a season, and as organizations age—communities, charities, companies, churches and more—they face similar diseases of time. These are emergent patterns of failure that arise not from mistakes but from the consequences of earlier success. In open source, we are seeing the same patterns emerge; this should not be a surprise. Some of them are unavoidable. Understanding them helps leaders reduce the risk that will arise and helps identify them when they do. This is by no means a comprehensive list, but we have encountered all of these modes of systemic failure, some of them often.
  • Spark and Hadoop Training Can Lead to Top Job Prospects
    In the tech job market race these days, hardly any trend is drawing more attention than Big Data. And, when talking Big Data, the subject of Hadoop inevitably comes up, but Spark is becoming an increasingly popular topic. IBM and other companies have made huge commitments to Spark, and workers who have both Hadoop and Spark skills are much in demand.With all this in mind, several providers are offering free Hadoop and Spark training.
  • Michael Meeks: 2016-12-08 Thursday.
    Mail chew; really encouraged to see Kolab's lovely integration with Collabora Online announced and available for purchase. Wonderful to have them getting involved with LibreOffice, doing testing, filing and triaging bugs up-stream and so on, not to mention the polished marketing.
  • LibreOffice Goes Online
    Well, Meeks and company have done it. What was at first a rather limited demonstration of LibreOffice running in a browser window is now available as a Docker image for everyone to try out. I haven’t yet, because I’m under the weather with yet another winter cold, but that shouldn’t delay you.
  • Tullett and Quaternion partner CU FinTech Lab on open source risk project
    Frank Desmond, CEO at TPI, says: “Quaternion’s open source risk framework is of huge value to the academic community, facilitating research into the fundamental drivers of financial markets. Our data, Quaternion’s innovative approach and Columbia University’s research will provide the financial markets with more clarity on risk."
  • Integral Ad Science Launches Open Source SDK For Mobile Viewability Measurement
    IAS worked on the SDK with support from Ansible, Google, InMobi, Lenovo, the Media Rating Council (MRC), and other firms. The goal is to bring more transparency and interoperability for mobile viewability measurement to publishers, marketers, and agencies.
  • Innovate Your Holiday Celebrations With Our Open Source Guide to Festivity
    Kate McKinnon’s got the right idea. In the spirit of “open source” sharing and collaboration, Slate’s holiday coverage this month will be an enthusiastic invitation to good-willed appropriation. In the weeks remaining until the new year, we’ll present a series of recommendations for the best traditions we know of, with an eye toward the specific, the peculiar, and the surprising—at least to non-adepts. We hope you’ll take one (or all!) of them, and incorporate it into your own celebrations. Consider it our gift to you. Happy holidays!

Devices/Mobile

  • AsteroidOS is an Open Source OS for Smartwatches
    Florent Revest is a French computer science student who has been working on an open source operating system for smartwatches for the last two years. Yesterday, he officially launched version 1 of the alpha for AsteroidOS. The goal for the platform was to create something that gave smartwatch owners more control over their privacy, as well as the hardware they purchased. Florent feels that the current proprietary platforms do not guarantee this, and this was the basis for AsteroidOS. He wanted his open source smartwatch operating system to provide freedom with free software, more privacy than other wearable platforms offer, interoperability so it could communicate with other devices, modularity that enabled the user to tweak and change the OS as they see fit, the ability to port the software to as many devices as possible, and gathering a community who is passionate about the platform.
  • AsteroidOS Brings Open Source Functionality To Smartwatches
    Smartwatches may not have taken off like companies were hoping, but they have come quite far in terms of what they can offer and what sorts of features are available for the many different models of smartwatches that are out there. Even with the updated functionality of options like Samsung’s Gear S lineup and Android Wear platforms, though, smartwatches can still feel a little bit limiting, and part of this undoubtedly includes the reason that the operating systems aren’t as open as platforms like Android. That is now changing thanks to a platform called AsteroidOS which is an open source operating system for smartwatches.
  • Mini Apollo Lake module takes the heat — and the cold
    Congatec’s “Conga-MA5” is a Linux-ready COM Express Compact Type 10 Mini module with Apollo Lake SoCs, up to 128GB eMMC 5.1, and -40 to 85°C support. Congatec was one of the first embedded vendors to announce computer-on-modules based on Intel’s Atom E3900 and other Apollo Lake Pentium and Celeron SoCs. The offerings included a Qseven module, a SMARC 2.0 module, and a COM Express Compact Type 6 Conga-TCA5. The company has now followed up with a COM Express Compact Type 10 Mini Conga-MA5 module.
  • Top 20 Best Tizen Apps for November 2016, Tizen Smartphone
  • Smartphone game: Indian Football League game comes to the Tizen Store

Security News

Red Hat and Fedora

Technical
  • Red Hat Takes OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat has steadily taken significant steps in the cloud computing arena, expanding the focus of its OpenShift open source Platform-as-a-Service hybrid cloud computing offering, including launching a cloud-hosted commercial edition called OpenShift Online. Now, the company has announced the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, according to Red Hat. Users also get access to Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Red Hat Launches OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform. The new offering brings Red Hat’s award-winning container platform as a managed service offering to enterprise customers who want to build, launch, and manage applications on OpenShift Dedicated with Google Cloud Platform as their underlying cloud infrastructure. With the availability of OpenShift Dedicated on Google Cloud Platform, users can speed adoption of containers, Kubernetes, and cloud-native application patterns, benefiting from Red Hat’s deep enterprise experience. Users also benefit from Google’s global, container-optimized infrastructure and can more easily augment their applications with Google’s ecosystem of data analytics, machine learning, compute, network, and storage services.
  • Image Gallery: Synnex Cloud Catalyst Conference Featuring Red Hat, XMedius, Plantronics
Financial Fedora/Community
  • Fedora 23 End of Life
    With the recent release of Fedora 25, Fedora 23 will officially enter End Of Life (EOL) status on December 20th, 2016. After December 20th, all packages in the Fedora 23 repositories will no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates, and no new packages will be added to the Fedora 23 collection. Upgrading to Fedora 24 or Fedora 25 before December 20th 2016 is highly recommended for all users still running Fedora 23.
  • What Is Wayland and What Does It Means for Linux Users
    Fedora 25 is now out. People are buzzing, as the team have decided to make Wayland the default graphical session going forward. For many Linux users Wayland is a new term that has popped up, but one that they do not understand. In this article we’ll briefly go over what Wayland is, what it does, and why developers are flocking to it in droves! What exactly is Wayland? Let’s find out!
  • Korora 25 is Ready
    The Korora Project has released version 25 (codename "Gurgle") which is now available for download. As usual, you can find a list of already known problems at the common F25 bugs page.
  • Fedora Design Interns Update
  • Holiday Break 2016.
    It’s sad I don’t get more time to post here these days. Being a manager is a pretty busy job, although I have no complaints! It’s enjoyable, and fortunately I have one of the best teams imaginable to work with, the Fedora Engineering team.