Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Android

Linux group builds 64-bit Android KitKat for ARM developers

Filed under
Android

Google is being tight-lipped about when the 64-bit version of Android will be released, but Linux development group Linaro has built a version of the open-source operating system so mobile applications can be written and tested by manufacturers and developers rushing to catch up with Apple.

Read more

LG releases G Watch promo video, promises to define the smartwatch

Filed under
Android
Gadgets

Ahead of the expected summertime release of LG’s new G Watch, their Android Wear-powered smartwatch, LG is building some hype by giving us a little glamour video of the watch.

Read more

Also: Yet another leaked picture of the LG G3 shows all three color versions

SODIMM-style COM runs Linux on Snapdragon S4 Pro

Filed under
Android
Linux

As usual with CompuLab, much of this I/O is customizable in terms of the numbers of interfaces provided. For example, the COM provides one or two MIPI-CSI camera ports. The CM-QS600 is supported with documentation and ready-to-run software packages for both Linux and Android, says CompuLab.

CompuLab is also offering a CM-QS600 evaluation kit that includes the COM plus an SB-QS600 baseboard. Although no details are currently listed for the baseboard, the kit ships with a 12V power supply, a WiFi antenna, and cables for WiFi, serial, and HDMI-to-DVI connections. The kit is said to be available with a 45-day trial period, and a year’s worth of technical support. CompuLab says it will also provide an LCD panel compatibility verification and driver adaptation service.

Read more

The Moto E is shockingly cheap and surprisingly good

Filed under
Android

The Moto E isn't the sort of phone you dream about or sketch concepts of in your spare time. It's made simply and of simple materials; it's neither extremely thin nor especially light. It's just a regular smartphone. What's different about the E, however, is its price: $129 without a contract. Nobody's going to fantasize about this phone because almost everyone who wants one should be able to afford it.

Motorola has proven with the Moto G, which costs $50 more than the new E, that it can condense a modern and responsive Android user experience within tight budget limitations. After only six months on the market, the G is already Motorola's best-selling smartphone ever, and is presently the top seller in Mexico and Brazil.

Read more

Ouya Portable Developed? Modder Creates Mobile 720p Version Of Open Source Console

Filed under
Android
Linux
Gadgets

A modder who goes by the name Downing has developed a portable version of the game system, which he revealed on his website. It's powered by batteries and boasts a 7-inch, 720p display. Downing showed off his Ouya Portable in pictures and a video, which you can see below.

Read more

'Tablet for hackers' no longer on sale

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

An Android tablet that was advertised as an open device for hackers appears to have gone off the market, quite soon after its release.

The ZaTab ZT2 (seen above) was advertised late last year on the website of the small California company ZaReason, which also sells PCs and laptops loaded with GNU/Linux.

It was listed along with the laptops on the website, but now is no longer featured there. There are, however, specific pages for this tablet and also the first one which the company produced, but one needs to know the URLs to view them.

The page for the ZT2 says the device is now out of stock.

Read more

'Half-Life 2' and 'Portal' arrive on Android, but only for the Shield

Filed under
Android
Gaming

Two of Valve's undisputed classics are making their Android debut today, courtesy of Nvidia's Shield console: Portal and Half-Life 2. Costing $10 each, the two games were ported by Nvidia, which explains why they're only playable on the Shield. Still, the job has been done with Valve's unreserved blessing and a promise by Doug Lombardi that you "can expect the same gameplay" as on the original PC versions. Even if the recreations aren't perfect, having two of the PC's greatest titles available on the Shield brings it a lot closer to its promise of being a true mobile console. With a price cut to $199 and a growing library of games and features, Nvidia's efforts at recreating PC-class gaming on an Android portable are looking increasingly compelling.

Read more

What's Android Silver? Samsung preps Tizen mobes 'for Russia, India'

Filed under
Android
Linux

If Samsung does indeed release a smartphone running Tizen it would be another sign that the company is not entirely happy in its relationship with Google and the amount of cash it can make from Android-powered handsets. As the world's number one mobe-maker, Samsung is certainly shifting hardware by the container-load. But as Apple, Amazon and Google have shown, sales of apps and content can deliver cash for years after a device is first sold.

Read more

Custom Layouts on Android

Filed under
Android

If you ever built an Android app, you have definitely used some of the built-in layouts available in the platform—RelativeLayout, LinearLayout, FrameLayout, etc. They are our bread and butter for building Android UIs.

The built-in layouts combined provide a powerful toolbox for implementing complex UIs. But there will still be cases where the design of your app will require you to implement custom layouts.

Read more

Android KitKat coming to older Samsung devices

Filed under
Android

According to the source for SamMobile, Samsung is having trouble porting KitKat to its third-generation Galaxy S flagship and has decided to cancel the update for the phone. Things could change in the coming months, but for now, all plans for bringing the update to the Galaxy S III are on hold. It’ll surely displease users of the device, but unless Samsung can find a solution to whatever issues it is facing, the Galaxy S III will probably spend its life on Android 4.3.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNOME Development Leftovers

  • Nightly GNOME Apps and New Adwaita GTK Theme Run Through
    In this video, we are quickly looking at Nightly GNOME Apps and a sneak peek at New Adwaita GTK Theme.
  • Emmanuele Bassi: And I’m home
    Of course I couldn’t stay home playing video games, recording podcasts, and building gunplas forever, and so I had to figure out where to go to work next, as I do enjoy being able to have a roof above my head, as well as buying food and stuff. By a crazy random happenstance, the GNOME Foundation announced that, thanks to a generous anonymous donation, it would start hiring staff, and that one of the open positions was for a GTK developer. I decided to apply, as, let’s be honest, it’s basically the dream job for me. I’ve been contributing to GNOME components for about 15 years, and to GTK for 12; and while I’ve been paid to contribute to some GNOME-related projects over the years, it was always as part of non-GNOME related work. The hiring process was really thorough, but in the end I managed to land the most amazing job I could possibly hope for.
  • Opera Launches Built-in Cryptocurrency Wallet for Android, ManagedKube Partners with Google Cloud to Provide a Monitoring App for Kubernetes Cluster Costs, QEMU 3.1 Released, IoT DevCon Call for Presentations and GNOME 3.31.3 Is Out
    GNOME 3.31.3 is out, and this will be the last snapshot of 2018. Note that this is development code meant for testing and hacking purposes. For a list of changes, go here, and the source packages are here.
  • Firmware Attestation
    When fwupd writes firmware to devices, it often writes it, then does a verify pass. This is to read back the firmware to check that it was written correctly. For some devices we can do one better, and read the firmware hash and compare it against a previously cached value, or match it against the version published by the LVFS. This means we can detect some unintentional corruption or malicious firmware running on devices, on the assumption that the bad firmware isn’t just faking the requested checksum. Still, better than nothing. Any processor better than the most basic PIC or Arduino (e.g. even a tiny $5 ARM core) is capable of doing public/private key firmware signing. This would use standard crypto using X.509 keys or GPG to ensure the device only runs signed firmware. This protects against both accidental bitflips and also naughty behaviour, and is unofficial industry recommended practice for firmware updates. Older generations of the Logitech Unifying hardware were unsigned, and this made the MouseJack hack almost trivial to deploy on an unmodified dongle. Newer Unifying hardware requires a firmware image signed by Logitech, which makes deploying unofficial or modified firmware almost impossible.
  • Robert Ancell: Interesting things about the GIF image format
  • GIFs in GNOME
  • About ncurses Colors
    These colors go back to CGA, IBM's Color/Graphics Adapter from the earlier PC-compatible computers. This was a step up from the plain monochrome displays; as the name implies, monochrome could display only black or white. CGA could display a limited range of colors. CGA supports mixing red (R), green (G) and blue (B) colors. In its simplest form, RGB is either "on" or "off". In this case, you can mix the RGB colors in 2x2x2=8 ways. Table 1 shows the binary and decimal representations of RGB.

Mozilla: Rust and WebAssembly, WebRender, MDN Changelog for November 2018, Things Gateway and Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday

  • Rust and WebAssembly in 2019
    Compiling Rust to WebAssembly should be the best choice for fast, reliable code for the Web. Additionally, the same way that Rust integrates with C calling conventions and libraries on native targets, Rust should also integrate with JavaScript and HTML5 on the Web. These are the Rust and WebAssembly domain working group’s core values. In 2018, we made it possible to surgically replace performance-sensitive JavaScript with Rust-generated WebAssembly.
  • rust for cortex-m7 baremetal
  • WebRender newsletter #33
    Yes indeed. In order for picture caching to work across displaylists we must be able to detect what did not change after a new displaylist arrives. The interning mechanism introduced by Glenn in #3075 gives us this ability in addition to other goodies such as de-duplication of interned resources and less CPU-GPU data transfer.
  • MDN Changelog for November 2018
    Potato London started work on this shortly after one-time payments launched. We kicked it off with a design meeting where we determined the features that could be delivered in 4 weeks. Potato and MDN worked closely to remove blockers, review code (in over 25 pull requests), and get it into the staging environment for testing. Thanks to everyone’s hard work, we launched a high-quality feature on schedule. We’ve learned a lot from these payment experiments, and we’ll continue to find ways to maintain MDN’s growth in 2019.
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
    Today, I'm going to talk about creating a Virtual Weather Station using the Things Gateway from Mozilla and a developer account from Weather Underground. The two combined enable home automation control from weather events like temperature, wind, and precipitation.
  • Taskgraph Like a Pro
    Have you ever needed to inspect the taskgraph locally? Did you have a bad time? Learn how to inspect the taskgraph like a PRO. For the impatient skip to the installation instructions below.
  • Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday, December 21th
    We are happy to let you know that Friday, December 21th, we are organizing Firefox 65 Beta 6 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: and changes and UpdateDirectory. Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

Fedora Developers Are Trying To Figure Out The Best Linux I/O Scheduler, Fedora 29 Review and Fedora Program Management

ARM's Work in Linux (Kernel)

  • Energy Model Management Framework Queued For Linux 4.21
    A new framework queued for introduction with the Linux 4.21 kernel is the ARM-developed Energy Model Management Framework. With different hardware and drivers exposing the processor/system energy consumption in different manners, the Energy Model Management Framework tries to provide a standardized way of accessing the power values for each performance domain in a system. This can help kernel drivers/schedulers and other code that could make smarter decisions based upon current energy use be able to do so via this standardized framework for acquiring the power information on capable systems.
  • ARM's AArch64 Adding Pointer Authentication Support To The Linux 4.21 Kernel
    The 64-bit ARM architecture code (a.k.a ARM64 / AArch64) with the Linux 4.21 kernel is seeing pointer authentication added as a new security feature. Pointer authentication can be supported by ARMv8.3 hardware and newer to allow for signing and authenticating of pointers against secret keys. The purpose of this pointer authentication is to mitigate ROP attacks and other potential buffer-overrun-style attacks. This ARM64_PTR_AUTH functionality will enable pointer authentication for all user-space processes and the presence of supported hardware is determined at run-time. ARM developers have been working on the plumbing for this Linux kernel support for it the past year.