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Kyocera 'DuraForce PRO' rugged Android smartphone has integrated HD action camera

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Android

Today, Kyocera announces an interesting smartphone that stands out among the others. The 'DuraForce PRO' is super-rugged, and has both an octacore processor and large 3,240mAh battery. The stand-out feature, however, is the integrated wide-angle HD action camera.

"DuraForce PRO was designed by Kyocera to be rugged for a reason -- to provide businesses and consumers with a dependable smartphone that can withstand the harshest environments and mishaps, all with the peace of mind of a 2-year manufacturer's warranty. For an industrious worker, an adventurous thrill-seeker or a parent on the go, DuraForce PRO incorporates cutting-edge technology and features designed to function in life’s most demanding moments. It is equipped with a large 5-inch Full HD display and a Qualcomm Snapdragon octa-core processor (1.5GHz x 4/1.2GHz x 4) with X8 LTE and multi-mode to ensure fast connections on diverse global networks", says Kyocera.

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Linux Devices

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Android
Linux
  • This Open Source Modular PC Might Solve The E-Waste Problem

    What do you think about this open source modular PC? A yay or a nay? Would you support this campaign?

  • Change Cometh

    I did finally kill off the last theme-related problem. I installed gtk-theme-config. It’s sad to think such a tool is needed to fix black on black as a default configuration… but it worked very well instantly. I picked light coloured backgrounds for default, panel and menu and dark foregrounds, mostly black. Done.

  • Embedded oriented Mini-ITX board packs serious Skylake-S heat

    With its 14nm-fabricated 6th Generation Core based INS8349A Mini-ITX board, Perfectron has leapfrogged several generations of Intel Core chips since its previous 3rd Gen “Ivy Bridge” INS8346B. The upgrade over Ivy Bridge gives you a 35 percent faster CPU and up to 49 percent faster GPU, says the company.

  • 15 Android apps that are worth buying

Canonical Makes It Easy to Port Native iOS and Android Apps to Ubuntu Mobile OS

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Android
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

Today, August 9, 2016, Canonical, through Richard Collins, was proud to announce the availability of the React Native web development framework for its popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

It appears that Canonical love web developers, and they always keep them in the loop with all the tools needed for the perfect job. After introducing support for the Cordova framework, which is very well supported on Ubuntu Linux and has received a lot of attention from web developers, today Canonical promise to offer full support for another great framework, namely React Native.

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Android Leftovers

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Android

Fossil’s new Android Wear smartwatches are available for preorder this week

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Android

Fossil’s Q Marshal and Q Wander smartwatches, which it introduced earlier this year, are going to be available for preorder starting on Friday. They’ll be in stores on August 29th. The watches start at $295.

Both come with always-on touchscreen displays and are compatible with both Android and iOS. The Wander comes with a gold finish and "soft curving." It’s pictured below:

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Android Leftovers (Nougat, Copperhead, Google Maps)

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Android
  • Android News: What’s new in Android 7.0 Nougat?

    Android 7.0 is just around the corner. What should we expect from Google’s next major release, code-named Nougat, when it drops in the next few weeks?

    For one, don’t expect earth-shattering updates. Android, like iOS, is a mature mobile operating system and platform with broad support, including massive development community. It’s definitely not 2009. Back then — Droid Does! — mobile and the smartphone tantalized us. Indeed, a brand new world. We were happily decommissioning our BlackBerrys and jumping into the new, exciting world of Android.

  • Copperhead OS: The startup that wants to solve Android’s woeful security

    A startup on a shoestring budget is working to clean up the Android security mess, and has even demonstrated results where other "secure" Android phones have failed, raising questions about Google's willingness to address the widespread vulnerabilities that exist in the world's most popular mobile operating system.

    "Copperhead is probably the most exciting thing happening in the world of Android security today," Chris Soghoian, principal technologist with the Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project at the American Civil Liberties Union, tells Ars. "But the enigma with Copperhead is why do they even exist? Why is it that a company as large as Google and with as much money as Google and with such a respected security team—why is it there's anything left for Copperhead to do?"

  • Google Maps for Android gets Wi-Fi-only mode and SD card download option

Android and Devices

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Android
Linux
Hardware
  • Kernel.org Is Knocking On The Door Of My Odroid-C2

    If this ~$100 CDN tiny box pleases TLW, it’s Good Enough. When a proper video driver gets into Linus’ mainline, say, with Wayland, and distros have all the usual applications working, these things will take over. It surely blows away her old VIA box with 8 core-gHz CPU, gigabit/s networking and 2gB RAM compared to 0.4 core-gHz, 100 mbits/s, and 0.25gB RAM. We’re using files over NFS so TLW will be able to use her old desktop environment on Beast III if she wants. Otherwise, she can use the Odroid-C2 as a thick client well enough. Cost for the old ones was ~$150 CDN delivered a decade ago, with real money, not this inflated stuff. Life is good.

  • ​Google wants you to log in once on Android - with any password manager
  • Google Says Goodbye to Android Wear's 'Together' Watch Face
  • Here's an open source PC that can be a laptop, desktop or even tablet

    Would-be backers of the open-source, modular EOMA68 PC card can now support the crowdfunding campaign by purchasing several new gadgets that work with the system.

    Fund-raising for the 'Easy-on-Mother-Earth' EOMA68 PC began in July and have now reached $66,000, or just under half of the $150,000 targeted by the end of August.

    The concept, from UK firm Rhombus Tech, is designed to demonstrate that computers can be easy and cheap to fix or upgrade with a standardized PC board and 3D printable housing and components. It also hopes the modular design can cut the mountains of e-waste produced by the tech industry.

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop News

  • Why Google plans to stop supporting your Chromebook after five years
    It’s worth noting that end-of-life doesn’t have to mean the end of useful hardware. If you have the know-how, you can install Linux on your Chromebook to extend its lifespan. Otherwise, users whose Chromebooks are still in fine working order just have to hope that end-of-life notification never comes.
  • EFF slams Microsoft's 'blatant disregard' for user privacy with Windows 10 [Ed: It's textbook definition of malware]
    THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER FOUNDATION (EFF) has lashed out at Microsoft over the company's "blatant disregard" for user privacy with the pushy, data-slurping Windows 10 operating system. Following the launch of a petition in June, EFF has heard from thousands of pissed off people who are asked it to take action against Microsoft, and the privacy campaigners are doing just that. EFF is calling on Microsoft to listen to its users, of which more than 6,000 have signed the online petition, and incorporate their complaints into its operating system. "Otherwise, Microsoft may find that it has inadvertently discovered just how far it can push its users before they abandon a once-trusted company for a better, more privacy-protective solution," EFF's Amul Kalia said in a blog post. First on EFF’s radar is Microsoft’s backhanded tactics to get people to upgrade to Windows 10, which we here at the INQUIRER know about all too well.

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Software

  • Summary
    And so, GSoC has come to an end. In this post, I'm going to describe what I have done in the past 13 weeks.
  • The State of Wayland's GSoC Project For Improved Output Handling
    Google's annual Summer of Code 2016 (GSoC) is now officially over and we're starting to see the final reports issued by the many student developers involved. One of the reports worth mentioning is the Wayland project around getting Weston to start without any outputs and improved output handling. Student developer Armin Krezović was getting his feet wet with Wayland this summer and was led b
  • GSoC with Pitivi
  • GUADEC Experience
    In this blog post, I will be sharing my GUADEC experience which recently held from 11-Aug-2015 to 17-Aug-2016 in Karlsruhe, Germany. I actually got to see the faces behind IRC nicks, met most of developers and people from GNOME community and also most importantly, GUADEC helped me to meet my Google Summer of Code mentor Debarshi Ray in person which was just great.
  • GNOME Usability Test Results (Part 1)
    This is the first part of analysis for the usability test I recently conducted, with the purpose to uncover usability flaws of two GNOME applications: Photos and Calendar. For this part I am focusing on visualizing the results, demographics and talk more about the methodology I used for testing. We will take a closer look on how testers performed on every task given, using a heat map. Hopefully this will create a clear picture of the testing process and help to “get to know” the participants and understand them better!
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/33
    Week 33 brought us again 5 snapshots (0812, 0813, 0815, 0816 and 0817). There were some smaller and bigger updates, as usual.

Leftovers: Debian

  • Reproducible Builds: week 69 in Stretch cycle
    Daniel Stender blogged about python packaging and explained some caveats regarding reproducible builds.
  • Proposing speakers for DebConf17
    As you may already know, next DebConf will be held at Collège de Maisonneuve in Montreal from August 6 to August 12, 2017. We are already thinking about the conference schedule, and the content team is open to suggestions for invited speakers.
  • Google Summer of Code 2016 : Final Report
    This project aims to improve diffoscope tool and fix Debian packages which are unreproducible in Reproducible builds testing framework.