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Android

The Linux Kernel: Android?

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Android
Linux

Now that we have studied the Linux kernel very well and learned how to make our own, we will move on to a slightly different direction in this series. Many of you may be unaware of this, but Android is Linux. True, they are not quite the same, but Android is Linux. For example, Ubuntu is "GNU/Linux" while Android is "Dalvik/Linux". If an operating system uses the Linux kernel, then it is a Linux system. The userland (GNU and Dalvik) does not determine whether an OS is Linux or not. Android uses a modified Linux kernel. As we know, Android runs on phones. As you may remember from configuring the kernel, there were no drivers for phone devices (like small keypads, 3G/4G cards, SIM cards, etc.). The Linux kernel used in Android lacks drivers that would not be in phones and instead has drivers for phone devices. In other words, no Android system uses a Vanilla Kernel.

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Best Android Apps For Finding and Sharing New Recipes

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Android
Software

Love cooking? Then you know how hard it is to find new recipes. Furthermore, it's even harder to share those recipes with your friends or family, especially when you are on the move. If you are into cooking, let go of all your worries about finding new recipes as we have curated some of the best recipe apps that you can download on your Android smartphone or tablet. These applications will not only help you find new recipes but also share them with the people that matter.

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Google's Project Tango Struts Into the Spotlight

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Android
Google

The prototype device has a 5-inch display, runs Android, and uses the Unity Game Engine. It is loaded with developer tools, including application programming interfaces, or APIs, that offer depth, orientation and position data to standard Android applications that are written in Java or C/C++ programming languages.

Google's Project Tango team spent a year working with research labs, universities and industrial partners to develop the device. The partners collaborated on ways to fit environment-mapping robotics and computer vision technologies into a phone.

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Rugged Android tablet offers IP65 ingress protection

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Android

Aaeon announced a rugged, 10.1-inch tablet running Android 4.0 on a Tegra 2 SoC, and featuring IP65 ingress protection and industrial temperature operation.

The Aaeon “RTC-900R” rugged tablet is designed for service workforces in applications including field service, law enforcement, defense, public sector, utilities, logistics, healthcare, restaurants, and retail management, says Aaeon. The tablet’s 2.4-pound heft 1-inch profile may be plus-size by commercial Android tablet standards, but the device is thinner and lighter than typical field service tablets, says the company.

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Are Android phones too big?

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Android

You don’t have to look too hard at the slate of new smartphones to see Android’s “bigger is better” ethos. While iPhones have remained resolutely conservatively sized, Android manufacturers continue to push the limits with phones like the 5.5-inch LG Optimus G Pro or the 6.3-inch Samsung Galaxy Mega.

There are some newer phones that do have sub-5-inch screens, fitting the “mini” trend. But these phones also have diminished internals. If you want the latest and best inside, a large outside is unavoidable.

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Linaro tackles Android and Linux security

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Android
Linux

Linaro is a not-for-profit company, owned by ARM and some of its top Cortex-A licensees, yet it acts much like an open source project. In addition to its core role of developing standardized Linux and Android toolchain for ARM-based devices, the 200-engineer organization sponsors a variety of Engineering Groups (see farther below).

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Jolla’s Sailfish OS will be available for Android devices

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Android

In addition to making the entire OS available for Android users, the company is also working on bringing the unique Jolla UI launcher to Android as an application.

Only disappointing story behind the UI is that unlike Mer/MeeGo it is a non-free or proprietary technology so it doesn’t excite an average open source user as much as it should have.

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Jolla unveils Sailfish OS 1.0, tips Angry Birds phone

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Android
Linux

Jolla announced the completion of version 1.0 of its MeeGo Linux based Sailfish OS, which runs on its Jolla smartphone, now shipping throughout Europe. The Finnish company also announced a Sailfish user interface launcher for Android, “which can be used to simulate the Sailfish OS experience on Android devices.”

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Visa, MasterCard start using Android for mobile payments

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Android

MasterCard and Visa want to make it easier for you to pay for goods at retail stores with a tap of a smartphone. The US credit card groups on Wednesday separately announced two Internet-based technologies providing merchants and banks with more options to make mobile payments happen in a big way.

The technologies follow the introduction of a new feature in the Android mobile operating system called Host Card Emulation (HCE). HCE allows any NFC (near field communication) application on an Android device to emulate a smart card, letting users wave-to-pay with their smartphones. Financial institutions, on the other hand, will benefit from hosting payment accounts in a secure, virtual cloud.

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Will Chrome OS and Android dominate the 2014 Linux desktop?

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Android
Linux

Android phone and tablet users have now become accustomed to the immense functionalities and level of comfort that the platform offers

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Android Leftovers

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool. The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot). In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice. Read more

How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.” Read more