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Android

The Linux Kernel: Android?

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Android
Linux

Now that we have studied the Linux kernel very well and learned how to make our own, we will move on to a slightly different direction in this series. Many of you may be unaware of this, but Android is Linux. True, they are not quite the same, but Android is Linux. For example, Ubuntu is "GNU/Linux" while Android is "Dalvik/Linux". If an operating system uses the Linux kernel, then it is a Linux system. The userland (GNU and Dalvik) does not determine whether an OS is Linux or not. Android uses a modified Linux kernel. As we know, Android runs on phones. As you may remember from configuring the kernel, there were no drivers for phone devices (like small keypads, 3G/4G cards, SIM cards, etc.). The Linux kernel used in Android lacks drivers that would not be in phones and instead has drivers for phone devices. In other words, no Android system uses a Vanilla Kernel.

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Best Android Apps For Finding and Sharing New Recipes

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Android
Software

Love cooking? Then you know how hard it is to find new recipes. Furthermore, it's even harder to share those recipes with your friends or family, especially when you are on the move. If you are into cooking, let go of all your worries about finding new recipes as we have curated some of the best recipe apps that you can download on your Android smartphone or tablet. These applications will not only help you find new recipes but also share them with the people that matter.

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Google's Project Tango Struts Into the Spotlight

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Android
Google

The prototype device has a 5-inch display, runs Android, and uses the Unity Game Engine. It is loaded with developer tools, including application programming interfaces, or APIs, that offer depth, orientation and position data to standard Android applications that are written in Java or C/C++ programming languages.

Google's Project Tango team spent a year working with research labs, universities and industrial partners to develop the device. The partners collaborated on ways to fit environment-mapping robotics and computer vision technologies into a phone.

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Rugged Android tablet offers IP65 ingress protection

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Android

Aaeon announced a rugged, 10.1-inch tablet running Android 4.0 on a Tegra 2 SoC, and featuring IP65 ingress protection and industrial temperature operation.

The Aaeon “RTC-900R” rugged tablet is designed for service workforces in applications including field service, law enforcement, defense, public sector, utilities, logistics, healthcare, restaurants, and retail management, says Aaeon. The tablet’s 2.4-pound heft 1-inch profile may be plus-size by commercial Android tablet standards, but the device is thinner and lighter than typical field service tablets, says the company.

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Are Android phones too big?

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Android

You don’t have to look too hard at the slate of new smartphones to see Android’s “bigger is better” ethos. While iPhones have remained resolutely conservatively sized, Android manufacturers continue to push the limits with phones like the 5.5-inch LG Optimus G Pro or the 6.3-inch Samsung Galaxy Mega.

There are some newer phones that do have sub-5-inch screens, fitting the “mini” trend. But these phones also have diminished internals. If you want the latest and best inside, a large outside is unavoidable.

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Linaro tackles Android and Linux security

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Android
Linux

Linaro is a not-for-profit company, owned by ARM and some of its top Cortex-A licensees, yet it acts much like an open source project. In addition to its core role of developing standardized Linux and Android toolchain for ARM-based devices, the 200-engineer organization sponsors a variety of Engineering Groups (see farther below).

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Jolla’s Sailfish OS will be available for Android devices

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Android

In addition to making the entire OS available for Android users, the company is also working on bringing the unique Jolla UI launcher to Android as an application.

Only disappointing story behind the UI is that unlike Mer/MeeGo it is a non-free or proprietary technology so it doesn’t excite an average open source user as much as it should have.

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Jolla unveils Sailfish OS 1.0, tips Angry Birds phone

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Android
Linux

Jolla announced the completion of version 1.0 of its MeeGo Linux based Sailfish OS, which runs on its Jolla smartphone, now shipping throughout Europe. The Finnish company also announced a Sailfish user interface launcher for Android, “which can be used to simulate the Sailfish OS experience on Android devices.”

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Visa, MasterCard start using Android for mobile payments

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Android

MasterCard and Visa want to make it easier for you to pay for goods at retail stores with a tap of a smartphone. The US credit card groups on Wednesday separately announced two Internet-based technologies providing merchants and banks with more options to make mobile payments happen in a big way.

The technologies follow the introduction of a new feature in the Android mobile operating system called Host Card Emulation (HCE). HCE allows any NFC (near field communication) application on an Android device to emulate a smart card, letting users wave-to-pay with their smartphones. Financial institutions, on the other hand, will benefit from hosting payment accounts in a secure, virtual cloud.

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Will Chrome OS and Android dominate the 2014 Linux desktop?

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Android
Linux

Android phone and tablet users have now become accustomed to the immense functionalities and level of comfort that the platform offers

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More in Tux Machines

OSS: IBM, Logz.io, Forbes FUD and OpenAI

Graphics: Mesa and More

Red Hat Leftovers

Kernel: CH341 and LWN Articles (Just Freed)

  • Linux Adds CH341 GPIO
    There was a time when USB to serial hardware meant one company: FTDI. But today there are quite a few to choose from and one of the most common ones is the WCH CH341. There’s been support for these chips in Linux for a while, but only for use as a communication port. The device actually has RS232, I2C, SPI, and 8 general purpose I/O (GPIO) pins. [ZooBaB] took an out-of-tree driver that exposes the GPIO, and got it working with some frightening-looking CH341 boards.
  • Shrinking the kernel with an axe
    This is the third article of a series discussing various methods of reducing the size of the Linux kernel to make it suitable for small environments. The first article provided a short rationale for this topic, and covered link-time garbage collection. The second article covered link-time optimization (LTO) and compared its results to link-time garbage collection. In this article we'll explore ways to make LTO more effective at optimizing kernel code away, as well as more assertive strategies to achieve our goal.
  • The rest of the 4.16 merge window
    At the close of the 4.16 merge window, 11,746 non-merge changesets had been merged; that is 5,000 since last week's summary. This merge window is thus a busy one, though not out of line with its predecessors — 4.14 had 11,500 changesets during its merge window, while 4.15 had 12,599. Quite a bit of that work is of the boring internal variety; over 600 of those changesets were device-tree updates, for example. But there was still a fair amount of interesting work merged in the second half of the 4.16 merge window; read on for the highlights.