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Android Leftovers

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Android
  • Android Pay could use your face to authenticate loyalty programs

    It's not that hard to add points to your loyalty cards on Android Pay, but it looks like Google is mulling on an experimental feature to automate the process. 9to5google has torn the latest version of the app apart and found lines of code that hint at a feature called "Visual ID," which authenticates your loyalty points by using facial recognition. Based on the strings the publication found, you'll have to create a "face template" when you activate the feature. Participating stores that have Visual ID cameras installed will then confirm your identity when you walk in. Once the system determines that it's you, and it ascertains your location using Bluetooth, Google will send them your loyalty details.

  • New Android security report is alarming, but not because of the amount of malware

    Better cooperation between Google and its major OEMs is essential to ensure that as many phones as possible are kept up to date with security patches. Most of the 3.5 million instances of malware that crop up this year will never get close enough to infect your phones, but it only takes one.

  • VAIO Launches Phone A: Snapdragon 617, 3 GB RAM, 5.5” FHD, Android
  • Why the guy who made Android is now betting on hardware

    Inside what used to be an abandoned Fry's Electronics warehouse in Palo Alto, California, Andy Rubin, the creator of Android, and three other Silicon Valley veterans are trying their hands at one of the tech industry's biggest challenges: building hardware.

    The four co-founded Playground Global, a startup "accelerator," in 2015. That's techspeak for a company that helps nurture young startups by providing support like mentorship, office space, and -- in the case of Playground, which works mostly with hardware startups -- machinery for prototyping.

  • Google kills Android Nougat beta – Android Oreo incoming?

    There will be no more beta-tested versions of Android Nougat software, as Google has finally killed off the beta program. Instead, we’re now hanging around for the full launch of Google’s Android O, following the release of the Developer Preview on March 21.

    Developers subscribed to the new Developer Preview are currently in ‘Preview 1’, which is basically an alpha phase. We’re not expecting to see a beta until the official Android O launch, which is likely to take place on May 17 during Google’s annual I/O developer conference.

Android Leftovers

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Tizen and Android

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Android
News

Android Leftovers

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BlackBerry KEYone review: A tale of a decent phone full of annoyances

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Reviews

The KEYone, the latest in the BlackBerry Ltd/TCL collaboration, is a phone that returns to the Canadian brand's iconic roots, for better or for worse. With Nougat and a strong focus on security, the KEYone is aimed at enterprise users and long-time fanatics.

Overall, the spec sheet for this phone is nothing chart-topping. The SoC is over a year old at this point and the screen has been downgraded from the year-and-a-half-old Priv's, but using the KEYone was mostly a pleasant experience until after about a week with it. That was when I started experiencing rather noticeable slowdown and other problems.

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Tizen and Android

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Linux

Android Leftovers

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FreeBSD News: 64-bit Inodes and KDE

  • FreeBSD Lands Support For 64-bit Inodes (ino64 Project)
    While Linux and other operating systems (including DragonFlyBSD) have supported 64-bit inodes for data structures on file-systems, FreeBSD has been limited to 32-bit. But thanks to the work of many on the ino64 project, FreeBSD now has support for 64-bit inodes while retaining backwards compatibility.
  • KDE FreeBSD CI (2)
    The KDE Continuous Integration system builds KDE software from scratch, straight from the git repositories, and usually from master (or whatever is considered the development branch). It’s been building for Linux for a long time, and has recently been expanded with FreeBSD servers as well. KDE sysadmin has been kind enough to provide two more VMs (with some more compiling “oomph”) so that we can keep up better, and the CI has just been expanded with all of the Plasma products. That means we’re now building KDE Frameworks, and the Plasma desktop.

Enlightenment 0.21.8

  • Enlightenment DR 0.21.8 Release
    This is another bugfix and stability release for the Enlightenment 21 Release series.
  • Enlightenment 0.21.8 Released
    Enlightenment 0.21.8 was released this week as the latest stable point release to the E21 series. Enlightenment 0.21.8 has a number of fixes, including some display fixes, avoid starting XWayland repeatedly, X11 and Wayland specific alterations, and other routine work.

Void Linux - the Strangely Overlooked Distribution

Ahh, Void Linux. You may or may not have heard of it. If you have, more than likely it was by word of mouth, so to speak, from internet comments on a forum, YouTube video or in passing on Reddit. But this little distro rarely gets any press or recognition otherwise. Perhaps it's time that changes, as Void Linux is an interesting distro in its own right and a good alternative to something like Arch Linux. It also has a no-systemd approach. Read more

5 myths busted: Using open source in higher education

Have you ever heard someone say, "It's impossible to do X with Linux"? Me too. This is the story of how I busted the myths about open source in my own head and used Linux to finish my PhD in fine arts. Read more