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Android

The Linux Kernel: Android?

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Android
Linux

Now that we have studied the Linux kernel very well and learned how to make our own, we will move on to a slightly different direction in this series. Many of you may be unaware of this, but Android is Linux. True, they are not quite the same, but Android is Linux. For example, Ubuntu is "GNU/Linux" while Android is "Dalvik/Linux". If an operating system uses the Linux kernel, then it is a Linux system. The userland (GNU and Dalvik) does not determine whether an OS is Linux or not. Android uses a modified Linux kernel. As we know, Android runs on phones. As you may remember from configuring the kernel, there were no drivers for phone devices (like small keypads, 3G/4G cards, SIM cards, etc.). The Linux kernel used in Android lacks drivers that would not be in phones and instead has drivers for phone devices. In other words, no Android system uses a Vanilla Kernel.

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Best Android Apps For Finding and Sharing New Recipes

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Android
Software

Love cooking? Then you know how hard it is to find new recipes. Furthermore, it's even harder to share those recipes with your friends or family, especially when you are on the move. If you are into cooking, let go of all your worries about finding new recipes as we have curated some of the best recipe apps that you can download on your Android smartphone or tablet. These applications will not only help you find new recipes but also share them with the people that matter.

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Google's Project Tango Struts Into the Spotlight

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Android
Google

The prototype device has a 5-inch display, runs Android, and uses the Unity Game Engine. It is loaded with developer tools, including application programming interfaces, or APIs, that offer depth, orientation and position data to standard Android applications that are written in Java or C/C++ programming languages.

Google's Project Tango team spent a year working with research labs, universities and industrial partners to develop the device. The partners collaborated on ways to fit environment-mapping robotics and computer vision technologies into a phone.

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Rugged Android tablet offers IP65 ingress protection

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Android

Aaeon announced a rugged, 10.1-inch tablet running Android 4.0 on a Tegra 2 SoC, and featuring IP65 ingress protection and industrial temperature operation.

The Aaeon “RTC-900R” rugged tablet is designed for service workforces in applications including field service, law enforcement, defense, public sector, utilities, logistics, healthcare, restaurants, and retail management, says Aaeon. The tablet’s 2.4-pound heft 1-inch profile may be plus-size by commercial Android tablet standards, but the device is thinner and lighter than typical field service tablets, says the company.

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Are Android phones too big?

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Android

You don’t have to look too hard at the slate of new smartphones to see Android’s “bigger is better” ethos. While iPhones have remained resolutely conservatively sized, Android manufacturers continue to push the limits with phones like the 5.5-inch LG Optimus G Pro or the 6.3-inch Samsung Galaxy Mega.

There are some newer phones that do have sub-5-inch screens, fitting the “mini” trend. But these phones also have diminished internals. If you want the latest and best inside, a large outside is unavoidable.

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Linaro tackles Android and Linux security

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Android
Linux

Linaro is a not-for-profit company, owned by ARM and some of its top Cortex-A licensees, yet it acts much like an open source project. In addition to its core role of developing standardized Linux and Android toolchain for ARM-based devices, the 200-engineer organization sponsors a variety of Engineering Groups (see farther below).

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Jolla’s Sailfish OS will be available for Android devices

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Android

In addition to making the entire OS available for Android users, the company is also working on bringing the unique Jolla UI launcher to Android as an application.

Only disappointing story behind the UI is that unlike Mer/MeeGo it is a non-free or proprietary technology so it doesn’t excite an average open source user as much as it should have.

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Jolla unveils Sailfish OS 1.0, tips Angry Birds phone

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Android
Linux

Jolla announced the completion of version 1.0 of its MeeGo Linux based Sailfish OS, which runs on its Jolla smartphone, now shipping throughout Europe. The Finnish company also announced a Sailfish user interface launcher for Android, “which can be used to simulate the Sailfish OS experience on Android devices.”

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Visa, MasterCard start using Android for mobile payments

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Android

MasterCard and Visa want to make it easier for you to pay for goods at retail stores with a tap of a smartphone. The US credit card groups on Wednesday separately announced two Internet-based technologies providing merchants and banks with more options to make mobile payments happen in a big way.

The technologies follow the introduction of a new feature in the Android mobile operating system called Host Card Emulation (HCE). HCE allows any NFC (near field communication) application on an Android device to emulate a smart card, letting users wave-to-pay with their smartphones. Financial institutions, on the other hand, will benefit from hosting payment accounts in a secure, virtual cloud.

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Will Chrome OS and Android dominate the 2014 Linux desktop?

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Android
Linux

Android phone and tablet users have now become accustomed to the immense functionalities and level of comfort that the platform offers

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Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • ASUS & Google Team Up for ‘Tinker Board’ AI-Focused Credit-Card Sized Computers

    ASUS and Google have joined forces to develop a new project that the companies are calling ‘Tinker Board’ single board computers (SBCs). With a footprint not much larger than a credit card, the systems are designed for building small systems to work on AI inference applications like image recognition. The systems in question are the Tinker Edge T and Tinker Edge R. The former is based on the NXP i.MX8M with an Edge TPU chip that accelerates TensorFlow Lite, whereas the Tinker Edge R is powered by the Rockchip RK3399 Pro processor with an NPU for 4K machine learning. The SBCs officially support Android and Debian operating system, though nothing prevents them from running Linux or other OSes.

  • Big believer in government open source? Help with an open task on code.gov

    Want to collaborate on government open source code projects? Don’t forget about code.gov.

    Technologists who want to support the various missions of the federal government need not take on a full-time role to contribute. The General Services Administration‘s lead for code.gov, Karen Trebon, gave a shoutout to the site’s “open tasks” tab during a panel at the Red Hat Government Summit on Tuesday.

  • How to drive customer experience with agile principles

    Customer experience has never been more important. People can find out just about anything with a few clicks or a voice search on their phones. They can research products, services, and companies. They can do business with organizations all over the world. They can buy with a swipe and have things shipped right to their home within a day.

  • When your data doesn’t fit in memory: the basic techniques
                         
                           

    You need a solution that’s simple and easy: processing your data on a single computer, with minimal setup, and as much as possible using the same libraries you’re already using. And much of the time you can actually do that, using a set of techniques that are sometimes called “out-of-core computation”.

  • Equifax Data Breach Update: Backsliding

    After Equifax’s calamitous 2017 data breach, its settlement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the private attorneys representing victims appears to offer two potential remedies to all 147 million American consumers affected: free credit monitoring, or if individuals already had free credit monitoring, an up to $125 cash payment. The FTC directed consumers affected by the breach to a third-party website where they could quickly and easily file their claim.

    At the time, EFF tepidly commented on the settlements’ efforts to compensate consumers. But we also noted that the $125 payments would come from a $31 million fund, meaning that if all 147 million victims chose the payment, each person’s payment would be reduced on a pro rata basis to as little as 21 cents each.

  • The Way America Votes Is Broken. In One Rural County, a Nonprofit Showed a Way Forward.

    Choctaw County’s election centers opened at 7 a.m. last Tuesday, and voters were greeted by poll workers who’d just set up brand-new voting machines.

    “If you need any help, just holler,” poll worker Albert Friddle told a voter as he walked her through the new system.

  • Microsoft Defender ATP Coming to Linux! What Does it Mean? [Ed: ItsFOSS now helps marketing of Microsoft proprietary software piggybacking the Linux brand. So much for "FOSS"... ItsMicrosoft?]
  • Microsoft Wants to Migrate Your IBM i Code to Azure [Ed: Why even choose Microsoft for any hosting?]
  • Kubernetes: 3 ways to get started

    Why has Kubernetes developed a reputation as a powerful tool? As Red Hat technology evangelist Gordon Haff has noted, “Kubernetes continues to gain steam in enterprises, and for good reason: It tames the complexity that arises as you begin to use containers at scale. It automates and orchestrates Linux container operations, eliminating many manual tasks involved in deploying and scaling containerized applications.” It’s also known for its learning curve: You can get a cluster up and running in a sandbox with relative ease, but running Kubernetes in production isn’t actually child’s play. That means that getting started with Kubernetes can feel daunting for individuals and teams new to it. This shouldn’t be crippling, though. Everyone starts somewhere. [...] Ram Middela, practice lead at NetEnrich, notes that Minikube gives you a chance to test-drive many of Kubernetes features in a single VM on a local machine. “You can explore most of the actual Kubernetes features from a developer perspective and learn about its features so that you can write your application deployment files and then run them on Minikube,” Middela says.

Mirantis acquires Docker Enterprise

Docker, the technology, is famous. It kick-started the container revolution. Docker, the company, is famous for failing to profit on its technology. Now, in a move indicating that Docker CEO Rob Bearden wasn't able to obtain badly needed capital, Mirantis, a prominent OpenStack and Kubernetes cloud company, has acquired Docker Enterprise product line, developers, and business. The deal is effective immediately. Mirantis CEO and co-founder Adrian Ionel, said in an e-mail interview, "We are not disclosing the terms of the deal. The deal closes Wednesday [Nov. 12, 2019] morning." Read more

Canonical Outs Major Linux Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu OSes

As announced the other day, Canonical was quick to respond to the latest security vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPU microarchitectures, so they now published Linux kernel updates to mitigate them. These are CVE-2019-11135, CVE-2018-12207, CVE-2019-0154, and CVE-2019-0155, which could allow local attackers to either expose sensitive information or possibly elevate privileges or cause a denial of service. On top of these security issues affecting Intel CPUs, the new Linux kernel security updates also address three vulnerabilities (CVE-2019-15791, CVE-2019-15792, and CVE-2019-15793) discovered by Google Project Zero's Jann Horn in the shiftfs implementation, which could allow a local attacker to either execute arbitrary code, cause a denial of service (system crash), or bypass DAC permissions. Read more