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Red Hat

Introducing flat-manager

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Red Hat

A long time ago I wrote a blog post about how to maintain a Flatpak repository.

It is still a nice, mostly up to date, description of how Flatpak repositories work. However, it doesn’t really have a great answer to the issue called syncing updates in the post. In other words, it really is more about how to maintain a repository on one machine.

In practice, at least on a larger scale (like e.g. Flathub) you don’t want to do all the work on a single machine like this. Instead you have an entire build-system where the repository is the last piece.

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Firefox Wayland By Default Diverted To Fedora 31

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Red Hat
Moz/FF

The plans to ship the Wayland-ized Firefox by default in Fedora 30 have been thwarted and will now have to wait until Fedora 31 to try again.

For a while now there's been the firefox-wayland package available for Fedora users to try the Wayland-native version of Firefox rather than having to run through XWayland when firing up this default web browser on Fedora Workstation. With Fedora 30 the developers were hopeful the Wayland Firefox version was finally in good enough shape to ship it by default, but that's not the case.

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Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Use Fedora Linux

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Linux
Red Hat

These are some of the major reasons why you should use Fedora. It might not be popular as Ubuntu or comes with advanced tools by default as Kali Linux or user-friendly as Linux Mint, but it has a solid base when it comes to latest features and security. Another fact is, anyone, can build a Linux distribution but you should not use one run by a single or few people. Fedora is backed by RedHat, one of the most reputable names in Linux industry and hence you will have peace of mind.

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Fedora: Community Blog, GNU Tools Cauldron 2019, and Fedora Logistics

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Red Hat

  • FPgM report: 2019-11

    I?ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. The Fedora 30 Beta Go/No-Go and Release Readiness meetings are next week.

  • Two new policy proposals

    In addition, we realized that we don’t have an explicit policy about issuing bans in channels for persistent off-topic conversation. We want to give teams within Fedora autonomy to act on their own within the boundaries of our Four Foundations and community norms.

  • Internationalization (i18n) features for Fedora 30
  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2019

    Simon Marchi just announced that the next GNU Tools Cauldron will be in Montreal, Canada from Thursday September 12 till Sunday September 15.

  • Yum vs. DNF Is Still Causing Headaches For Fedora Logistics

    While the DNF package manager as the "next-generation Yum" has been in development for over a half-decade and has been the default over traditional Yum for a number of Fedora releases, it's still causing headaches for some and a subset of users still desiring that DNF be renamed to Yum.

    On newer Fedora installations, yum does already point to dnf and the experience these days at least from my personal perspective has been quite good with DNF being the default now since Fedora 22... I haven't had any real DNF troubles now in years, though with RHEL8 Beta even still calling it "yum", there are some oddities from being so ingrained to Yum for the past two decades especially for system administrators.

The 10 Best Reasons to Use Fedora Linux

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Red Hat

Fedora needs no introduction because it is one of the most popular Linux distribution alongside big names like Ubuntu, Debian, and Red Hat. But just in case you are coming across the distro for the first time, you should know that it is a professional, customizable Red Hat-backed Linux distro famous for giving its users the latest features while remaining true to the open source community.

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Also: GNOME 3.32 released & coming to Fedora 30

Red Hat and SUSE: Drools, Systemd, Libinput, Fedora and Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

    Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

  • Why feedback, not metrics, is critical to DevOps

    Most managers and agile coaches depend on metrics over feedback from their teams, users, and even customers. In fact, quite a few use feedback and metrics synonymously, where they present feedback from teams or customers as a bunch of numbers or a graphical representation of those numbers. This is not only unfortunate, but it can be misleading as it presents only part of the story and not the entire truth.

  • L2TP Tunnel Support Added To Systemd

    The newest feature addition for systemd is supporting L2TP, the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol, as part of its networking code. 

    Systemd's networkd now has support merged for LT2TP tunnel support. L2TP can be used for extending a local area network (LAN) or also for VPN purposes when paired with the likes of IPsec for providing encryption. L2TP also has a variety of other use-cases with this bare protocol able to offer a layer two link over an L3 network.

  • libinput 1.12.901
    The first RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    Only two notable features in this release but patches are accumulating on
    master, it's been 6 months since 1.12 and I've decided to postpone the two
    major features (hi-res scrolling and totem support) to 1.14.
    
    
    
    
    Touch arbitration has improved for tablets, especially on touch screens.
    A timer set on pen proximity out means we don't get ghost touches anymore
    when the hand lifts off slower than the pen itself. And location-based touch
    arbitration means that parts of the screen can be interacted with even while
    the pen is in proximity. libinput uses the tilt information where
    available to disable touches in a rectangle around the pen where the hand is
    likely to be but leaves the rest of the touchscreen available otherwise.
    Where the UI supports it, this allows for bimanual interaction.
    
    
    
    
    The test suite is installed on demand (meson -Dinstall-tests=true). Where
    run from the installed location it will use the normal library lookups and
    the quirks directory as defined by the prefix. This makes it useful for
    distribution-level testing, i.e. run this on a test machine after updating
    the package to make sure everything is as expected. Where available, you can
    invoke it with the "libinput test-suite" command.
    
    
    
    
    Other than that, a load of fixes, quirks added, cleanups, tidy-ups and so on
    an so forth.
    
    
    
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below. Many thanks to all the contributors.
  • Libinput 1.13 Is Coming But High-Resolution Scrolling & Dell Totem Support Delayed

    Libinput is fairly mature at this stage for offering a unified input handling library for use on both X.Org and Wayland Linux desktops. Libinput has largely reached a feature plateau with new releases no longer coming out so often and no glaring gaps in support. With it already being a half-year since the last major release, libinput 1.13 is now being buttoned up for release and available today is the first release candidate. 

    Libinput 1.13 isn't that exciting of a release particularly since maintainer Peter Hutterer of Red Hat decided to delay the high resolution scrolling support. The Linux 5.0 kernel brought the much anticipated high resolution scrolling support for various Logitech/Microsoft mice to improve the scroll-wheel experience. Besides the kernel support, there is also the user-space support that needs updating. Peter decided to delay this functionality now until Libinput 1.14 to give it more time to bake.

  • New package in Fedora: python-xslxwriter
  • First Public Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0!

Fedora Moving from fedmsg to fedora-messaging, Red Hat Academy, and Red Hat Moving Closer to Microsoft

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Red Hat

The Fedora infrastructure is working on replacing our current message bus fedmsg by a new library fedora-messaging based on AMQP. This is an update on the work currently in progress.

After deploying a RabbitMQ cluster and bridges to duplicate messages from fedmsg to the fedora-messaging and from fedora-messaging to fedmsg. We are now starting the migration of application to fedora-messaging.

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In Red Hat:

  • Educating the next generation of technology professionals

    The Red Hat Academy program is now available at more than 1,140 academic institutions around the world, offering top-quality education programs on Red Hat technologies and helping students learn practical, open source IT skills. Red Hat Academy is an academic training program designed to help institutions differentiate themselves by providing an enterprise-ready Linux and open source curriculum. With more than 90 percent of Fortune 500 companies using Red Hat tools and services, Red Hat Academy provides individuals with opportunities of growth through in-demand content and hands-on labs with flexibility.

  • Strengthening the power of collaboration: Why Red Hat and Microsoft are extending our partnership

    In the nearly four years since our landmark announcement, Red Hat and Microsoft have seen immense value delivered to our customers, from co-support of hybrid cloud deployments to waves of upstream innovation for expanded Linux capabilities. We’re pleased to continue this great work in the years ahead and look forward to helping enterprises harness the power of open enterprise technologies across the hybrid cloud.

Flatpak 1.3

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Red Hat
  • Flatpak 1.3 Brings Support For Multiple NVIDIA GPUs, Sandboxed DConf

    The Flatpak 1.3 unstable series has kicked off starting the latest round of feature work to this leading Linux sandboxing / app distribution technology.

    Flatpak 1.3.0 is available for testing as the first unstable/development release for what will eventually become Flatpak 1.4. The Flatpak 1.3 release now supports multiple NVIDIA GPUs, support for systems where /var/run is a symlink (e.g. Gentoo), initial support for sandboxed DConf support, and generating the AppStream branch is now much faster on large repositories, among other improvements. There's also the usual assortment of bug fixing and some translation updates in this release.

  • Flatpak 1.3 Arrives with Support for Linux Systems with Multiple Nvidia Devices

    Flatpak developer and maintainer Alexander Larsson released a new unstable release of the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, targeting the upcoming Flatpak 1.4 stable series.

    Flatpak 1.3 is here as the first milestone is a series of unstable releases towards the next major and stable new version of the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, Flatpak 1.4, adding several new features and improvements like support for systems with multiple Nvidia devices.

    Furthermore, the Flatpak 1.3 release adds initial support for sandboxed dconf, introduces two new options to the build-update-repo command, namely --no-update-[summary,appstream] and --static-delta-ignore-ref=PATTERN, and improves support for large repositories by making regeneration the appstream branch faster.

Fedora: Python Leap and Sponsoring Project Libravatar

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Red Hat
  • EPEL: Python34->Python36 Move Happening (Currently in EPEL-testing)

    Over the last 5 days, Troy Dawson, Jeroen van Meeuwen, Carl W George, and several helpers have gotten nearly all of the python34 packages moves over to python36 in EPEL-7. They are being included in 6 Bodhi pushes because of a limitation in Bodhi for the text size of packages in an include.

    The current day for these package groups to move into EPEL regular is April 2nd. We would like to have all tests we find in the next week or so also added so that the updates can occur in a large group without too much breakage.

  • Fedora Magazine: Libravatar has a new home

    The project originated from the will to have a free, as in freedom, service alternative to Gravatar, giving the users the possibility to use a hosted service or to run their own instance of the service and have full control of their data.

    In April 2018 the Libravatar project announced that the service will be shutting down. The service is/was being used by many communities like Fedora, Mozilla and the Linux Kernel to name a few. The announcement triggered a big response from the community, of people interested and willing to help to keep it running.

  • Streamlio Launches Streamlio Cloud, Firefox Announces Firefox Send, GraphQL Foundation Collaborating with the Joint Development Foundation, the Fedora Project Is Sponsoring Libravatar and the Linux Foundation Announces Community Bridge

    The Fedora Project is now sponsoring Libravatar, the "free and open source service that anyone can use to host and share an avatar (profile picture) to other websites". The Libravatar blog describes the project as "part of a movement working to give control back to people, away from centralized services and the organizations running them. It addresses a simple problem: putting a face on an email address." The Libravatar project had announced it was shutting down about a year ago, but the Fedora Project worked with the community to keep it alive.

Fedora: fwupd, FSF, ABRT and Plans to Use GCC Security Hardening Flags by Default

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Red Hat
  • A fwupd client side certificate

    In the soon-to-be-released fwupd 1.2.6 there’s a new feature that I wanted to talk about here, if nothing else to be the documentation when people find these files and wonder what they are. The fwupd daemon now creates a PKCS-7 client self-signed certificate at startup (if GnuTLS is enabled and new enough) – which creates the root-readable /var/lib/fwupd/pki/secret.key and world-readable /var/lib/fwupd/pki/client.pem files.

    These certificates are used to sign text data sent to a remote server. At the moment, this is only useful for vendors who also have accounts on the LVFS, so that when someone in their QA team tests the firmware update on real hardware, they can upload the firmware report with the extra --sign argument to sign the JSON blob with the certificate. This allows the LVFS to be sure the report upload comes from the vendor themselves, and will in future allow the trusted so-called attestation DeviceChecksums a.k.a. the PCR0 to be set automatically from this report. Of course, the LVFS user needs to upload the certificate to the LVFS to make this work, although I’ve written this functionality and am just waiting for someone to review it.

  • New FAF 2.0.0 released

    The latest release of FAF comes with two major changes.

    The first one is that we’ve decided to drop the support of Python2 code.
    The second one is an abandonment of YUM in favour of DNF.

    Since release 1.3.4 we’ve also migrated from fedmsg to fedora-messaging infrastructure.

  • Ernestas Kulik: Reporting problems in Flatpak applications

    If you’ve ever experienced a crash in a Flatpak application, you might have noticed that there is no notification coming from ABRT for it, and maybe you even noticed some strange messages in the system journal:

    abrt-server[…]: Unsupported container technology
    The above appears when ABRT attempts to collect information about the container (currently only Docker and LXC), if the binary has been detected to have been run in one. For Flatpak applications, we probably get enough information already, so we can just special-case and do nothing instead.

    Unfortunately, getting things like stack traces gets a bit more complicated than that.

  • Fedora 31 Plans To Use GCC Security Hardening Flags By Default

    Fedora 31 will likely be enabling various GCC security hardening flags by default in trying to further enhance the security of the software in its repositories and those building software on their own Fedora systems.

    While Fedora generally leads the way with low-level innovations to the Linux stack thanks to Red Hat, in this case they are a bit behind the ball for enabling these GCC security hardening flags. In fact, the flags they are planning to use by default are already the defaults on Ubuntu.

    With Fedora 31 they would enable "-Wformat -Wformat-security -fstack-protector-strong" flags by default for checking printf/scanf calls to ensure a proper format string is specified and conversions are correct, warning about possible security problems for the formatted printing, and additional stack protector protections.

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More in Tux Machines

15 Best Free Linux Wiki Engines

A wiki is a page or collection of Web pages designed to enable anyone who accesses it to contribute or modify content, using a simplified markup language. A Wiki engine is a type of collaborative software that runs a wiki system. This facilitates web pages being created and edited using a web browser. This type of software is usually implemented as an application server that runs on one or more web servers. The content is stored in a file system, and changes to the content are typically stored in a relational database management system (such as MySQL), although some simple wiki engines use text files instead. Wikis try to make it as simple as possible to write and share useful content, using intuitive page naming and text formatting conventions. Wikis are usually (but not always) wide open and assume a cooperating community. However, with spam bots prevalent, most wiki engines have lots of anti-spam measures such as page permissions, Access Control Lists, host blocking, blacklists, and CAPTCHAs in place. To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 15 high quality free Linux wiki engines. Hopefully, there will be something of interest for anyone who wishes to share information with others. Read more Also: Michal Čihař: translation-finder 1.1

Games: Stadia Scepticism, Epic, Linux Gaming Report and More

  • Stadia is about the future of YouTube, not gaming

    Yesterday, Google announced plans for a new game-streaming service called Stadia. Besides the logo, the controller, and a single game — Doom Eternal — the announcement left us with more questions than answers. Primary in my mind has been the query of why Google needs to be in the gaming business at all. Isn’t it enough to dominate web search, ads, and browsers, smartphone operating systems, and maps? What part of our lives does Google not want to know about? And then it dawned on me that we might be looking at it from the wrong perspective: what if Stadia isn’t a case of Google aggressively entering a new business sphere, but rather a defensive one to protect its existing kingdom?

  • Google Stadia's Grand Vision for Gaming Clashes With America's Shitty Internet

    Slow speeds, usage caps, and overage fees could mar the long-awaited arrival of game streams.

  • Slow Broadband, Usage Caps Could Mar Google Stadia's Game Streaming Ambitions
    I can remember being at E3 in 2000 and being pitched on the idea of a sort of "dumb terminal" for gaming. As in, you wouldn't need a computer or game console in your home, since all of the actual game processing would be accomplished in the cloud then streamed to your TV via broadband. Most of these early pitches never materialized. Initially because cloud computing simply wasn't fully baked yet, but also thanks to America' shoddy broadband. Cloud-based game streaming is something the industry has continued to push for, though nobody has yet to truly crack the market. Onlive probably tried the hardest, though again a lack of real cloud horsepower and sketchy residential broadband prevented the service from truly taking off. Undaunted, Google took to the stage at the Game Developers Conference to unveil Stadia, a looming game streaming platform that will let gamers play top-shelf games on any hardware with a Chrome browser. Google insists that the service, when it launches this summer, will be able to drive games at up to 4K resolution and 60 frames per second seamlessly between multiple devices with no need for game consoles, high-end PCs, loading times, or installs. The whole presentation is available here:
  • Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney on PC store moderation: ‘We’re not in the porn business’

    Last year, Valve announced a hands-off approach to Steam that would allow anything onto the platform “except for things that we decide are illegal, or straight up trolling.” In addition to the Rape Day controversy, that policy has pushed Valve to take hardline stances on content revolving around child exploitation, school shootings, and most recently around tributes memorializing the New Zealand shooter. Sweeney, it seems, does not see the value it trying to protect content that pushes up against that amorphous line.

  • Linux Gaming Report and Purism Librem 15 | Choose Linux 5
    Jason goes deeper down the rabbit hole by exploring the state of Steam gaming on 9 different Linux distributions. Find out how Fedora compares to Pop!_OS. Plus, first impressions of Purism’s brand new Librem 15 v4 laptop.
  • Objects in Space released for Linux on Steam, needs you to disable Steam Play
    While the Linux version has been up on GOG for a little while, Steam was left a bit behind. Now the Linux version on Steam has been officially announced and released but there's an issue with Steam Play.
  • First-person roguelike 'Barony' released the Myths & Outcasts DLC recently, also now on GOG
    Barony is a game I hadn't honestly touched in a very long time, which all changed with the Myths & Outcasts DLC that released last month giving new ways to play. It's also now on GOG, so that's great.
  • Chasm, the adventure platformer from Bit Kid just had a big update giving more variety
    Chasm, the crowdfunded adventure platformer continues to see great post-release support with the latest big free update out now. While it's not a personal favourite of mine (I much prefer Dead Cells honestly), it's still a reasonably good game overall. In fact, it's far better than a lot of action/adventure platformers and it does look great.
  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive now has much better queue times for Danger Zone
    Following on from the tweak to Danger Zone to focus more on duos, Valve are still tweaking their Battle Royale mode in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive as well as the game as a whole. Firstly, for Danger Zone you should now see much better queue times for matchmaking. Before this patch, I could easily see queue times around 3 to 5 minutes (often the latter) even with a lot of people online which is not ideal and frankly that makes me (and no doubt others) get bored and look to play something else. Since this patch has dropped, I've played a good 30-40 matches and not a single one has hit even 2 minutes queue time (under 1 minute mostly now!) which is a pretty huge improvement.

Nuvola: Linux Desktop Music Player for Streaming Services

Take a look at features and installation of Nuvola Music Player, a music player for Linux desktop that plays streaming music services. Read more

LibreOffice 6.2.2 Office Suite Released with More Than 50 Fixes, Download Now

While LibreOffice 6.1 is still the recommended version for those who want a more stable and well-tested LibreOffice office suite, LibreOffice 6.2.2 is here for technology enthusiasts and early adopters who want to get a taste of the latest new features and innovations in the free and open-source office suite used by millions of computer users worldwide. "LibreOffice 6.2.2 represents the bleeding edge in term of features for open source office suites, and as such is not optimized for enterprise-class deployments, where features are less important than robustness. Users wanting a more mature version can download LibreOffice 6.1.5, which includes some months of back-ported fixes.," said Italo Vignoli. Read more