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Red Hat

'We expect this is the bottom' in enterprise growth: Red Hat CEO

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Introducing Red Hat Quay

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Embracing container orchestration has many implications for an enterprises’ technology stack. An image registry becomes a critical component of the deployment pipeline. Red Hat Quay is a mature enterprise-centric container image registry which has a rich history of meeting the needs of cloud native technologists.

When Red Hat acquired CoreOS earlier this year, we were looking to amplify our leadership in enterprise container-based solutions. CoreOS at the time had two primary products, Tectonic and Quay. Quay was added directly into Red Hat’s portfolio of products and renamed Red Hat Quay.

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Also: FPgM report: 2018–38

Red Hat: Kevin M. Murai, Microsoft Puff Pieces, Red Hat CEO Optimistic About OpenShift 4.0 as RHEL Lags

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Fedora: Fedora 29 Beta Soon, Fedora Is Looking For Help Testing Their New Silverblue, Fedora at Software Freedom Day

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  • Fedora 29 Beta Will Be Released Next Week

    After slipping last week, the highly anticipated Fedora 29 beta release will set sail next week.

    At Thursday's meeting on the state of the Fedora 29 beta bugs, it was decided that the beta is ready to ship. After five release candidates of the beta, the blocker bugs around installation problems, some GNOME bugs, and other blockers have been resolved.

  • Fedora Is Looking For Help Testing Their New Silverblue

    Fedora is hosting a test day today for testing their new Silverblue spin, formerly known as Fedora Atomic Workstation.

    With the Fedora 29 release due out in about one month it will be their first under the new Silverblue branding. Fedora Silverblue should be pretty much usable today, but by Fedora 30 next spring they are aiming for it to be in great shape.

    Silverblue sets up Fedora to excel at container-based computing, rely upon Flatpaks for desktop applications, support a variety of technologies and workflows via GNOME Software, and other modern approaches to OS development and software deployment.

  • Software Freedom Day – SFD

    Software Freedom Day (SFD) is a Technology Event held annually worldwide to promote and disseminate the benefits of Free Software, its Philosophy and related Technologies.

    On September 15th, I was invited to give a talk about Fedora, this event that took place at the National University of San Luis Gonzaga, Ica.

Red Hat: News and Financial Results

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Q&A—Red Hat's Brian Gracely on open source and doubling down on Kubernetes

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Red Hat
OSS
Security

I think a couple of things. I think in general, in terms of filling technology holes and driving new innovation, open source has no problems and no lack of projects right now. In fact, probably the biggest thing we hear from a lot of companies is it's great that there's so much out there, how do we keep up with all of them?

Right now, I think there's a general sentiment from a lot of enterprise companies, telco companies and so-forth that most of innovation that's happening these days are in open source, moreso than it is coming from many vendors. So on one hand, that's a really good thing, a really positive thing.

The flip side of that is, because there's so much going on and there's so many things happening so fast. Open source has never been known for being the people that sit and finish up projects. They've always sort of gotten it to a good solid point that does 80% of what you want it to do, or it works well enough but there's not great interfaces and things on it.

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Red Hat's "DevOps" Hype Again and Analysis of last Night's Financial Results

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Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

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  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions

    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.

  • Security Embargos at Red Hat

    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them.

    When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.

  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards

    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.

Fedora be pretty - The ultimate customization guide

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I am quite pleased with the final result of this transformation. But it also requires a lot of non-standard changes, which is a shame, because none of what I did, subjective taste elements aside, is super complicated. Imagine a Fedora, or for that any which distro, that has everything really nicely tailored for max. efficiency, ergonomics, productivity, and fun.

My journey encompasses the use of third-party repos, extra software, Gnome Tweak Tool, about a dozen extensions, new themes, icons, and fonts, the use of a dock, plus some extra visual polish. In the end, though, Fedora 28 looks and behaves the part. This is something I could happily show to other people, and I am convinced they would be inclined to try it. Well, there you go. The guide. Hopefully, you'll find it useful, and perhaps it may even hype up your enthusiasm for Linux. In these dreary times, an injection of fanboyese is quite needed. Take care.

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Red Hat Reports Results, Shares Collapse

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