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Red Hat

Fedora: Systemd, AskFedora, Varnish

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Red Hat

Introducing flat-manager

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Red Hat

A long time ago I wrote a blog post about how to maintain a Flatpak repository.

It is still a nice, mostly up to date, description of how Flatpak repositories work. However, it doesn’t really have a great answer to the issue called syncing updates in the post. In other words, it really is more about how to maintain a repository on one machine.

In practice, at least on a larger scale (like e.g. Flathub) you don’t want to do all the work on a single machine like this. Instead you have an entire build-system where the repository is the last piece.

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Firefox Wayland By Default Diverted To Fedora 31

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Red Hat
Moz/FF

The plans to ship the Wayland-ized Firefox by default in Fedora 30 have been thwarted and will now have to wait until Fedora 31 to try again.

For a while now there's been the firefox-wayland package available for Fedora users to try the Wayland-native version of Firefox rather than having to run through XWayland when firing up this default web browser on Fedora Workstation. With Fedora 30 the developers were hopeful the Wayland Firefox version was finally in good enough shape to ship it by default, but that's not the case.

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Top 5 Reasons Why You Should Use Fedora Linux

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Linux
Red Hat

These are some of the major reasons why you should use Fedora. It might not be popular as Ubuntu or comes with advanced tools by default as Kali Linux or user-friendly as Linux Mint, but it has a solid base when it comes to latest features and security. Another fact is, anyone, can build a Linux distribution but you should not use one run by a single or few people. Fedora is backed by RedHat, one of the most reputable names in Linux industry and hence you will have peace of mind.

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Fedora: Community Blog, GNU Tools Cauldron 2019, and Fedora Logistics

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Red Hat

  • FPgM report: 2019-11

    I?ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. The Fedora 30 Beta Go/No-Go and Release Readiness meetings are next week.

  • Two new policy proposals

    In addition, we realized that we don’t have an explicit policy about issuing bans in channels for persistent off-topic conversation. We want to give teams within Fedora autonomy to act on their own within the boundaries of our Four Foundations and community norms.

  • Internationalization (i18n) features for Fedora 30
  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2019

    Simon Marchi just announced that the next GNU Tools Cauldron will be in Montreal, Canada from Thursday September 12 till Sunday September 15.

  • Yum vs. DNF Is Still Causing Headaches For Fedora Logistics

    While the DNF package manager as the "next-generation Yum" has been in development for over a half-decade and has been the default over traditional Yum for a number of Fedora releases, it's still causing headaches for some and a subset of users still desiring that DNF be renamed to Yum.

    On newer Fedora installations, yum does already point to dnf and the experience these days at least from my personal perspective has been quite good with DNF being the default now since Fedora 22... I haven't had any real DNF troubles now in years, though with RHEL8 Beta even still calling it "yum", there are some oddities from being so ingrained to Yum for the past two decades especially for system administrators.

The 10 Best Reasons to Use Fedora Linux

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Red Hat

Fedora needs no introduction because it is one of the most popular Linux distribution alongside big names like Ubuntu, Debian, and Red Hat. But just in case you are coming across the distro for the first time, you should know that it is a professional, customizable Red Hat-backed Linux distro famous for giving its users the latest features while remaining true to the open source community.

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Also: GNOME 3.32 released & coming to Fedora 30

Red Hat and SUSE: Drools, Systemd, Libinput, Fedora and Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

    Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

  • Why feedback, not metrics, is critical to DevOps

    Most managers and agile coaches depend on metrics over feedback from their teams, users, and even customers. In fact, quite a few use feedback and metrics synonymously, where they present feedback from teams or customers as a bunch of numbers or a graphical representation of those numbers. This is not only unfortunate, but it can be misleading as it presents only part of the story and not the entire truth.

  • L2TP Tunnel Support Added To Systemd

    The newest feature addition for systemd is supporting L2TP, the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol, as part of its networking code. 

    Systemd's networkd now has support merged for LT2TP tunnel support. L2TP can be used for extending a local area network (LAN) or also for VPN purposes when paired with the likes of IPsec for providing encryption. L2TP also has a variety of other use-cases with this bare protocol able to offer a layer two link over an L3 network.

  • libinput 1.12.901
    The first RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    Only two notable features in this release but patches are accumulating on
    master, it's been 6 months since 1.12 and I've decided to postpone the two
    major features (hi-res scrolling and totem support) to 1.14.
    
    
    
    
    Touch arbitration has improved for tablets, especially on touch screens.
    A timer set on pen proximity out means we don't get ghost touches anymore
    when the hand lifts off slower than the pen itself. And location-based touch
    arbitration means that parts of the screen can be interacted with even while
    the pen is in proximity. libinput uses the tilt information where
    available to disable touches in a rectangle around the pen where the hand is
    likely to be but leaves the rest of the touchscreen available otherwise.
    Where the UI supports it, this allows for bimanual interaction.
    
    
    
    
    The test suite is installed on demand (meson -Dinstall-tests=true). Where
    run from the installed location it will use the normal library lookups and
    the quirks directory as defined by the prefix. This makes it useful for
    distribution-level testing, i.e. run this on a test machine after updating
    the package to make sure everything is as expected. Where available, you can
    invoke it with the "libinput test-suite" command.
    
    
    
    
    Other than that, a load of fixes, quirks added, cleanups, tidy-ups and so on
    an so forth.
    
    
    
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below. Many thanks to all the contributors.
  • Libinput 1.13 Is Coming But High-Resolution Scrolling & Dell Totem Support Delayed

    Libinput is fairly mature at this stage for offering a unified input handling library for use on both X.Org and Wayland Linux desktops. Libinput has largely reached a feature plateau with new releases no longer coming out so often and no glaring gaps in support. With it already being a half-year since the last major release, libinput 1.13 is now being buttoned up for release and available today is the first release candidate. 

    Libinput 1.13 isn't that exciting of a release particularly since maintainer Peter Hutterer of Red Hat decided to delay the high resolution scrolling support. The Linux 5.0 kernel brought the much anticipated high resolution scrolling support for various Logitech/Microsoft mice to improve the scroll-wheel experience. Besides the kernel support, there is also the user-space support that needs updating. Peter decided to delay this functionality now until Libinput 1.14 to give it more time to bake.

  • New package in Fedora: python-xslxwriter
  • First Public Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0!

Fedora Moving from fedmsg to fedora-messaging, Red Hat Academy, and Red Hat Moving Closer to Microsoft

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Red Hat

The Fedora infrastructure is working on replacing our current message bus fedmsg by a new library fedora-messaging based on AMQP. This is an update on the work currently in progress.

After deploying a RabbitMQ cluster and bridges to duplicate messages from fedmsg to the fedora-messaging and from fedora-messaging to fedmsg. We are now starting the migration of application to fedora-messaging.

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In Red Hat:

  • Educating the next generation of technology professionals

    The Red Hat Academy program is now available at more than 1,140 academic institutions around the world, offering top-quality education programs on Red Hat technologies and helping students learn practical, open source IT skills. Red Hat Academy is an academic training program designed to help institutions differentiate themselves by providing an enterprise-ready Linux and open source curriculum. With more than 90 percent of Fortune 500 companies using Red Hat tools and services, Red Hat Academy provides individuals with opportunities of growth through in-demand content and hands-on labs with flexibility.

  • Strengthening the power of collaboration: Why Red Hat and Microsoft are extending our partnership

    In the nearly four years since our landmark announcement, Red Hat and Microsoft have seen immense value delivered to our customers, from co-support of hybrid cloud deployments to waves of upstream innovation for expanded Linux capabilities. We’re pleased to continue this great work in the years ahead and look forward to helping enterprises harness the power of open enterprise technologies across the hybrid cloud.

Flatpak 1.3

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Red Hat
  • Flatpak 1.3 Brings Support For Multiple NVIDIA GPUs, Sandboxed DConf

    The Flatpak 1.3 unstable series has kicked off starting the latest round of feature work to this leading Linux sandboxing / app distribution technology.

    Flatpak 1.3.0 is available for testing as the first unstable/development release for what will eventually become Flatpak 1.4. The Flatpak 1.3 release now supports multiple NVIDIA GPUs, support for systems where /var/run is a symlink (e.g. Gentoo), initial support for sandboxed DConf support, and generating the AppStream branch is now much faster on large repositories, among other improvements. There's also the usual assortment of bug fixing and some translation updates in this release.

  • Flatpak 1.3 Arrives with Support for Linux Systems with Multiple Nvidia Devices

    Flatpak developer and maintainer Alexander Larsson released a new unstable release of the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, targeting the upcoming Flatpak 1.4 stable series.

    Flatpak 1.3 is here as the first milestone is a series of unstable releases towards the next major and stable new version of the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, Flatpak 1.4, adding several new features and improvements like support for systems with multiple Nvidia devices.

    Furthermore, the Flatpak 1.3 release adds initial support for sandboxed dconf, introduces two new options to the build-update-repo command, namely --no-update-[summary,appstream] and --static-delta-ignore-ref=PATTERN, and improves support for large repositories by making regeneration the appstream branch faster.

Fedora: Python Leap and Sponsoring Project Libravatar

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Red Hat
  • EPEL: Python34->Python36 Move Happening (Currently in EPEL-testing)

    Over the last 5 days, Troy Dawson, Jeroen van Meeuwen, Carl W George, and several helpers have gotten nearly all of the python34 packages moves over to python36 in EPEL-7. They are being included in 6 Bodhi pushes because of a limitation in Bodhi for the text size of packages in an include.

    The current day for these package groups to move into EPEL regular is April 2nd. We would like to have all tests we find in the next week or so also added so that the updates can occur in a large group without too much breakage.

  • Fedora Magazine: Libravatar has a new home

    The project originated from the will to have a free, as in freedom, service alternative to Gravatar, giving the users the possibility to use a hosted service or to run their own instance of the service and have full control of their data.

    In April 2018 the Libravatar project announced that the service will be shutting down. The service is/was being used by many communities like Fedora, Mozilla and the Linux Kernel to name a few. The announcement triggered a big response from the community, of people interested and willing to help to keep it running.

  • Streamlio Launches Streamlio Cloud, Firefox Announces Firefox Send, GraphQL Foundation Collaborating with the Joint Development Foundation, the Fedora Project Is Sponsoring Libravatar and the Linux Foundation Announces Community Bridge

    The Fedora Project is now sponsoring Libravatar, the "free and open source service that anyone can use to host and share an avatar (profile picture) to other websites". The Libravatar blog describes the project as "part of a movement working to give control back to people, away from centralized services and the organizations running them. It addresses a simple problem: putting a face on an email address." The Libravatar project had announced it was shutting down about a year ago, but the Fedora Project worked with the community to keep it alive.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Indigo Igloo, Raspberry Pi Projects and Ibase

  • AR-controlled robot could help people with motor disabilities with daily tasks
    Researchers employed the PR2 robot running Ubuntu 14.04 and an open-source Robot Operating System called Indigo Igloo for the study. The team made adjustments to the robot including padding metal grippers and adding “fabric-based tactile sensing” in certain areas.
  • 5 IoT Projects You Can Do Yourself on a Raspberry Pi
    Are you new to the Internet of Things and wonder what IoT devices can do for you? Or do you just have a spare Raspberry Pi hanging around and are wondering what you can do with it? Either way, there are plenty of ways to put that cheap little board to work. Some of these projects are easy while others are much more involved. Some you can tackle in a day while others will take a while. No matter what, you’re bound to at least get some ideas looking at this list.
  • Retail-oriented 21.5-inch panel PCs run on Kaby Lake and Bay Trail
    Ibase’s 21.5-inch “UPC-7210” and “UPC-6210” panel PCs run Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U and Bay Trail CPUs, respectively. Highlights include 64GB SSDs, mini-PCIe, mSATA, and IP65 protection.

NexDock 2 Turns Your Android Phone or Raspberry Pi into a Laptop

Ever wished your Android smartphone or Raspberry Pi was a laptop? Well, with the NexDock 2 project, now live on Kickstarter, it can be! Both the name and the conceit should be familiar to long-time gadget fans. The original NexDock was a 14.1-inch laptop shell with no computer inside. It successfully crowdfunded back in 2016. The OG device made its way in to the hands of thousands of backers. While competent enough, some of-the-time reviews were tepid about the dock’s build quality. After a brief stint fawning over Intel’s innovative (now scrapped) Compute Cards, the team behind the portable device is back with an updated, refined and hugely improved model. Read more

Graphics: Libinput 1.13 RC2, NVIDIA and AMD

  • libinput 1.12.902
    The second RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    This is the last RC, expect the final within the next few days unless
    someone finds a particulaly egregious bug.
    
    One user-visible change: multitap (doubletap or more) now resets the timer
    on release as well. This should improve tripletap detection as well as any
    tripletap-and-drag and similar gestures.
    
    valgrind is no longer a required dependency to build with tests. It was only
    used in a specific test run anyway (meson test --setup=valgrind) and not
    part of the regular build.
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    
    Benjamin Poirier (1):
          evdev: Rename button up and down states to mirror each other
    
    Feldwor (1):
          Set TouchPad Pressure Range for Toshiba L855
    
    Paolo Giangrandi (1):
          touchpad: multitap state transitions use the same timing used for taps
    
    Peter Hutterer (3):
          tools: flake8 fixes, typo fixes and missing exception handling
          meson.build: make valgrind optional
          libinput 1.12.902
  • Libinput 1.13 RC2 Better Detects Triple Taps
    Peter Hutterer of Red Hat announced the release of libinput 1.13 Release Candidate 2 on Thursday as the newest test release for this input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland Linux systems. Libinput 1.13 will be released in the days ahead as the latest six month update to this input library. But with the time that has passed, it's not all that exciting of a release as the Logitech high resolution scrolling support as well as Dell Totem input device support for the company's Canvas display was delayed to the next release cycle. But libinput 1.13 is bringing touch arbitration improvements for tablets, various new quirks, and other fixes and usability enhancements.
  • Open-Source NVIDIA PhysX 4.1 Released
    Software releases are aplenty for GDC week and NVIDIA's latest release is their newest post-4.0 PhysX SDK. NVIDIA released the open-source PhysX 4.0 SDK just before Christmas as part of the company re-approaching open-source for this widely used physics library. Now the latest available is PhysX 4.1 and the open-source code drop is out in tandem.
  • AMD have launched an update to their open source Radeon GPU Analyzer, better Vulkan support
    AMD are showing off a little here, with an update to the Radeon GPU Analyzer open source project and it sounds great.

New Release of GNU Parallel and New FSF-Endorsed Products From ThinkPenguin

  • GNU Parallel 20190322 ('FridayforFuture') released
    GNU Parallel 20190322 ('FridayforFuture') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/ The change in signalling makes this release experimental for users that send SIGTERM to GNU Parallel.
  • Seven new devices from ThinkPenguin, Inc. now FSF-certified to Respect Your Freedom
    Thursday, March 21st, 2019 -- The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today awarded Respects Your Freedom (RYF) certification to seven devices from ThinkPenguin, Inc.: The Penguin Wireless G USB Adapter (TPE-G54USB2), the Penguin USB Desktop Microphone for GNU / Linux (TPE-USBMIC), the Penguin Wireless N Dual-Band PCIe Card (TPE-N300PCIED2), the PCIe Gigabit Ethernet Card Dual Port (TPE-1000MPCIE), the PCI Gigabit Ethernet Card (TPE-1000MPCI), the Penguin 10/100 USB Ethernet Network Adapter v1 (TPE-100NET1), and the Penguin 10/100 USB Ethernet Network Adapter v2 (TPE-100NET2). The RYF certification mark means that these products meet the FSF's standards in regard to users' freedom, control over the product, and privacy. [...] "I've always believed that the biggest difficulty for users in the free software world has been in obtaining compatible hardware, and so I'm glad to be participating in the expansion of the RYF program" said Christopher Waid, founder and CEO of ThinkPenguin. ThinkPenguin, Inc. was one of the first companies to receive RYF certification, gaining their first and second certifications in 2013, and adding several more over the years since. "ThinkPenguin has excelled for years in providing users with the tools they need to control their own computing. We are excited by these new additions today, and look forward to what they have in store for the future," said the FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Donald Robertson, III.
  • FSF Certifies A USB Microphone For Respecting Your Freedom Plus Some Network Adapters
    The Free Software Foundation has announced the latest batch of hardware it has certified for "Respecting Your Freedom" as part of its RYF program. Seven more devices from Linux-focused e-tailer Think Penguin have been certified for respecting your freedoms and privacy in that no binary blobs are required for use nor any other restrictions on the hardware's use or comprising the user's privacy.