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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

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How to make sense of the Apache 2 patent license

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OSS
Legal

In essence, when a software developer contributes code to a project (i.e., the Work under the license), he or she becomes a Contributor. Under the above term, Contributors are granting permission to use any of their patents that may read on their contribution. This provides peace of mind to users since the Contributor would likely be prevented from pursuing patent royalties from any users of the software covering that contribution to the project.

Complexities arise when the software developer contributes code that is not claimed by any of the Contributor's patents by itself, but only when combined with the Apache 2.0 licensed open source program to which the contribution was made (i.e., the Work under the license). Thus, the Contributor owning such a patent could pursue patent royalties against a user of that revised Work. The authors of the Apache 2.0 license were forward thinking and account for this scenario. Section 3 states that the license applies to "patent claims licensable by such Contributor that are necessarily infringed... by a combination of their Contribution(s) with the Work to which such Contributions was submitted."

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Red Hat: CoreOS and Shares

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Fedora Might Begin Having A Release Manager

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Fedora developers are now discussing the possibility of naming a release manager each development cycle as a person in charge of wrangling together each release and seeing that the "Rawhide" development state is kept in better condition. Who knows, this also might actually help Fedora's longtime trouble of delivering releases on time.

Fedora Project Leader Matthew Miller started the mailing list discussion today about whether they should have a release manager each release cycle. His latest motivation for thinking about this is they haven't had a successful nightly compose of the latest Fedora Rawhide development state in about two weeks. While Red Hat employs QA and release engineering folks working on Fedora, their development tip isn't always kept in a release-able state unlike Ubuntu daily ISOs and some other Linux distributions.

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Red Hat: Elisa, Fedora Test Day, CentOS Dojo and FOSDEM 2018

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  • Elisa, Red Hat to demonstrate network throughput boosting software at MWC

    Elisa said it will be demonstrating a cloud-ready mobile network automation system for telecommunication operators at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona from 26 February to 01 March. It will showcase Elisa SON (Self-Organising Networks) there with Red Hat. Elisa SON uses closed loop automation and tailored algorithms that can double user data throughput on an existing network.

    Elisa offers unlimited data plans to subscribers, so its networks carry a high volume of mobile data. For this reason, it has focused on optimising network performance and getting maximum value out of its existing equipment.

  • Red Hat–1-2-3 on App Modernization

    David Egts, chief technologist for Red Hat public sector has some words of wisdom for Federal managers seeking ways to move from legacy applications to more agile environments: modernization is not just about adopting new technologies and practices, it is about what happens to the old ones.

    Three application migration patterns are emerging as government agencies and commercial businesses attempt to modernize aging, mission-critical applications: Lift and Shift, Augment with New Layers, and Rewrite, Egts said. He noted that Red Hat’s PaaS Community of Practice leader, expounded on these approaches in a whitepaper, Making Old Applications New Again.

    So, which approach is best? “There is no single right answer,” Egts said. It depends on the application, the business, and contextual factors, as well as what stage the applications are in their life cycle. However, for the best results, agencies should partner “with system integrators or vendors that can cover all three migrations, and join you in this journey,” Egts advised.

    How do the three patterns work?

  • NuWave Investment Management LLC Invests $228,000 in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Glowing Stock’s Review
  • How much should pay for $1 Earnings? On Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Signition LP Acquires Shares of 5,178 Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Contribute at the Fedora Test Day for kernel 4.15

    The kernel team is working on final integration for kernel 4.15. This version was just recently released, and will arrive soon in Fedora. This version has many security fixes included. As a result, the Fedora kernel and QA teams have organized a test day for Thursday, February 22. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test images you’ll need to participate.

  • CentOS Dojo and FOSDEM 2018

    FOSDEM is one of the largest open source conferences in the world, with over 8000 participants. As many developers gather not just from Europe but from all around the world, there are a number of pre- and post conferences timed to happen before and after FOSDEM. This year before FOSDEM, I also participated at the CentOS Dojo, a whole-day event about CentOS.

Red Hat: Openwashing the Brand, Financial News, and Fedora

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Red Hat Interview, Podcast and Financial News

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Red Hat: .NET Promotion, Leaving Red Hat to Join Linaro, Supplemental Wallpaper for Fedora 28 and More

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

Linux: To recurse or not

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see. Read more

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • MX Linux Review of MX-17 – For The Record
    MX Linux Review of MX-17. MX-17 is a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS Linux communities. It’s XFCE based, lightning fast, comes with both 32 and 64-bit CPU support…and the tools. Oh man, the tools available in this distro are both reminders of Mepis past and current tech found in modern distros.
  • Samsung Halts Android 8.0 Oreo Rollouts for Galaxy S8 Due to Unexpected Reboots
    Samsung stopped the distribution of the Android 8.0 Oreo operating system update for its Galaxy S8 and S8+ smartphones due to unexpected reboots reported by several users. SamMobile reported the other day that Samsung halted all Android 8.0 Oreo rollouts for its Galaxy S8/S8+ series of Android smartphones after approximately a week since the initial release. But only today Samsung published a statement to inform user why it stopped the rollouts, and the cause appears to be related to a limited number of cases of unexpected reboots after installing the update.
  • Xen Project Contributor Spotlight: Kevin Tian
    The Xen Project is comprised of a diverse set of member companies and contributors that are committed to the growth and success of the Xen Project Hypervisor. The Xen Project Hypervisor is a staple technology for server and cloud vendors, and is gaining traction in the embedded, security and automotive space. This blog series highlights the companies contributing to the changes and growth being made to the Xen Project and how the Xen Project technology bolsters their business.
  • Initial Intel Icelake Support Lands In Mesa OpenGL Driver, Vulkan Support Started
    A few days back I reported on Intel Icelake patches for the i965 Mesa driver in bringing up the OpenGL support now that several kernel patch series have been published for enabling these "Gen 11" graphics within the Direct Rendering Manager driver. This Icelake support has been quick to materialize even with Cannonlake hardware not yet being available.
  • LunarG's Vulkan Layer Factory Aims To Make Writing Vulkan Layers Easier
    Introduced as part of LunarG's recent Vulkan SDK update is the VLF, the Vulkan Layer Factory. The Vulkan Layer Factory aims to creating Vulkan layers easier by taking care of a lot of the boilerplate code for dealing with the initialization, etc. This framework also provides for "interceptor objects" for overriding functions pre/post API calls for Vulkan entry points of interest.