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Red Hat

Testing openSUSE, Manjaro, Debian, Fedora, and Mint Linux distributions on my new laptop

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Linux
Red Hat
Debian
SUSE

Due to the recent unfortunate demise of a couple of my computers I found myself in need of a new laptop on rather short notice. I found an Acer Aspire 5 on sale at about half price here in Switzerland, so I picked one up. I have been installing a number of Linux distributions on it, with mostly positive results.

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Fedora Decides To Not Allow SSPLv1 Licensed Software Into Its Repositories

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Red Hat
Server
OSS
Legal

Back in October, MongoDB announced the Server Side Public License v1 (SSPLv1) as their new license moving forward for this document-oriented database server over their existing AGPL code. SSPL was met with much controversy upon its unveiling and Fedora's legal team has now ruled it an invalid free software license for packaged software in its repositories.

The intent of MongoDB developing the Server Side Public License was to ensure that public cloud vendors and other companies using their software as a service are giving back to the community / the upstream project. SSPL v1 was based on the GPLv3 but lays clear that a company publicly offering the SSPL-licensed software as a service must in turn open-source their software that it uses to offer said service. That stipulation applies only to organizations making use of MongoDB for public software services.

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Deepin Desktop Option Approved For Fedora 30

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Red Hat

Last month we mentioned that Fedora 30 was possibly picking up a Deepin Desktop Environment option for this Qt5-based desktop developed by the Deepin Linux distribution.

Assuming the packaging work remains in good shape, the Deepin desktop option will be found in the May release of Fedora 30. The Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) has formally approved of Deepin being offered by Fedora 30.

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Fedora: Releases, PHP and Fedora Test Day

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Red Hat

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • DevOps for the hybrid cloud: Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.4

    With the growth of the cloud and containers, DevOps has become increasingly important. Old-school sysadmin methods and means simply aren't up to managing server instances that can spin up at a moment's notice when needed. Red Hat knows that better than many companies, so its latest release, Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.4, goes even further in automating today's IT stack.

  • Looking for a reason to attend SUSECON? I’ve got 5!
  • SUSE Linux for Arm is now available for all customers

    Subscriptions for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm and SUSE Manager Lifecycle for Arm are now available directly to customers through the Corporate price list or through the SUSE Shop https://www.suse.com/shop/
    Previously, SUSE subscriptions for the Arm hardware platforms were only available to SUSE Partners due to the relative immaturity of the Arm server platform. Now that we have delivered four releases of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for Arm and have customers running SUSE Linux on Arm servers as diverse as the tiny Raspberry Pi and the high performance HPE Apollo 70 servers, we are now ready to sell subscriptions directly to customers.

Systemd 241 Being Prepared With "System Down" Security Fixes

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Linux
Red Hat
Security

While systemd 240 was released right before Christmas, it looks like systemd 241 will soon be released in order to address the recent "System Down" security vulnerabilities.

In case you missed it from earlier in the week, three vulnerabilities were discovered in systemd's journald: two memory corruption bugs and an information leak due to an out-of-bounds read. These vulnerabilities have been in systemd the past several years and and could enable a local root shell in a matter of minutes on i386 systems or in about an hour on x86_64. Well, except for the likes of Fedora and openSUSE systems that make use of GCC's stack clash protection. Details on those vulnerabilities via Qualys.

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A new logo for the Fedora distro

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Red Hat

Let’s talk about the logo that the Fedora community is talking about and analyzing. I’m really too happy that the Fedora Project, one of my favorite Linux distro, is evaluating a new logo proposal.

Fedora was my first distro and I will undoubtedly be tied to her for the lifetime. It has served me faithfully every time on laptops, desktops, servers, and PIs. At this time, there are two proposals that have received greater care and interesting, they are further skimming and reworking of a long process to rebrand the old logo.

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IBM and Red Hat: Quantum Hype, ORNL and Red Hat Ansible Tower

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Red Hat
Server
  • IBM Unveils Q System One Quantum Computer

    Quantum computing still seems like it comes from the pages of a science fiction novel, but it is slowly getting closer to being a commercial reality. At CES 2019, IBM Research has made what it hopes is a big step in that direction with what it calls the “first fully-integrated commercial quantum computer,” the Q System One. Existing quantum computers are confined to R&D labs, while the Q System One includes both the electronics and cooling components needed in a single package that was developed in concert with leading industrial designers. An extraordinary amount of cooling is needed to reduce qubit errors and reduce the need for additional qubits to be used for error correction.

  • My 2018 in Review: Making headlines year

    Usually, July is the month in where many interns go to ORNL to have real-world experiences in their fields. Some of them are students from schools, colleges, and universities and I had enough time to interact with most of them and to realize that some of them need more preparation in topics related to HPC such as Linux commands, HPC concepts, Programming, and Deep Learning.

  • Red Hat feathers nested workflows

    Red Hat inside IBM continues to look a lot like Red Hat… but just inside IBM.

    The [commercial] open source champions at Red Hat have clearly pressed on with ALL the firm’s various roadmap rollouts, the most recent of which is Red Hat Ansible Tower a its version 3.4 release.

    But what is it?

    This is a software framework for automating [data & application processes] across IT operations including infrastructure, networks, cloud and security [layers].

  • Red Hat Boosts Workflow Automation With Ansible Tower 3.4 Update

    Red Hat announced the general availability of Ansible Tower 3.4 on Jan. 9, providing enterprises with updated capabilities for automating workflows on-premises and in the cloud.

    Among the new capabilities in Red Hat Ansible Tower 3.4 is increased scalability with a job slicing feature that enables workloads to be more distributed. Security has been enhanced with a new mode providing support for the Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS 140-2) security certification. Additionally, new modes for workflows have been integrated, including nested workflow to enable advanced orchestration scenarios.

Red Hat OpenStack 14 now generally available

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Red Hat

Red Hat OpenStack Platform 14 is now generally available. We announced plans for the release in November 2018 during OpenStack Summit in Berlin, where Red Hat led more than 40 sessions including workshops, training classes and demos.

Red Hat OpenStack Platform 14 includes several new benefits, including simplifying the adoption of container-based workloads through tighter integration with Red Hat OpenShift Platform.

Today, Red Hat is happy to announce general availability for Red Hat OpenStack Platform 14. In case you missed the previous announcement, here is a quick run down.

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Fedora, Red Hat and IBM Updates

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Red Hat
  • Laura Abbott: Kernel numbering and Fedora

    By now it's made the news that the kernel version has jumped to version 5.0. Once again, this numbering jump means nothing except Linus decide that he wanted to change it. We've been through versioning jumps before (2.6 -> 3.x, 3.x -> 4.x) so practically we know how to deal with this by now. It still takes a bit of hacking on the kernel packaging side though.

    Fedora works off of a package git (pkg-git) model. This means that the primary trees are not git trees of the actual source code but git trees of a spec file, patches, and any other scripts. The sources get uploaded in compressed archive format. For a stable fedora release (F28/F29 as of this writing), the sources are a base tarball (linux-4.19.tar.xz) and a stable patch on top of that (patch-4.19.14.xz). Rawhide is built off of Linus' master branch. Using 4.20 as an example, start with the last base release (linux-4.19.tar.xz), apply an -rc patch on top (patch-4.20-rc6.xz) and then another patch containing the diff from the rc to master on that day (patch-4.20-rc6-git2.xz). We have scripts to take care of grabbing from kernel.org and generating snapshots automatically so kernel maintainers don't usually think too much about this.

  • Better loop mounts with NBD. Take your loop mounts to the next level with nbdkit

    I’ve been working at Red Hat for 12 years, on a whole variety of different things, all relating to free and open source software. Most recently I’ve been concentrating on virtualization and how we inspect and modify the disk images used by virtual machines. I’ve written a whole load of tools for this, such as guestfish, virt-builder and nbdkit.

    Before I started at Red Hat I was involved in three start-ups, respectively in: high-performance networking; schools & online communities; and online marketing.

  • Kernel 4.20 Test Day 2019-01-15
  • In science and in space: Red Hat leads the way for supercomputing

    The computation capabilities and scale of supercomputers have grown and are expected to continue growing. The next big trend we’re likely to see is exascale computing, where supercomputers will be able to perform at least one billion billion (quintillion) floating point operations per second. At the moment, teams in the United States, Europe, Japan and China are all racing to build and deliver exascale systems in the next 3-5 years. It is no coincidence that this new generation of systems is referred to as “intelligent” supercomputers, as they have nearly enough processing power to simulate a human brain in software.

    We recently attended SC18, the leading supercomputing conference, and have several takeaways on what the future looks like for high performance computing (HPC).

    Originally projected to arrive this year, based on Moore's law, exascale class systems are now expected to appear by 2021, largely based on innovative approaches in hardware design, system-level optimizations and workload-specific acceleration. Several years ago, HPC visionaries determined that we can no longer rely on commodity Central Processing Unit (CPU) technologies alone to achieve exascale computing and became vigorously involved in innovation around other parts of the system.

  • Report: Investor drops lawsuit over $34B IBM-Red Hat merger

    An investor in Raleigh-based Red Hat on Tuesday filed a lawsuit seeking to block a shareholder vote on the firm’s $34 billion merger with IBM.

    The investor identified as Charles Orgel had filed the suit in federal court in Delaware.

  • Open Outlook: Global Services

    As we enter the fourth quarter of our fiscal year, I would like to take some time to reflect on the trends we are learning from our customers in the Red Hat Global Services Organization and what the next year holds for us.

    Looking back at 2018, I am most proud of the success we have seen as our role in the business increased. Services played a more prominent part in sales conversations, as more complex deals demanding solution approaches, adoption roadmaps, and return on investment emerged. As a result, we have seen training and services revenue growth of more than 25 percent in fiscal year 2018.

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600 days of postmarketOS

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Essential System Tools: Krusader – KDE file manager

This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at Krusader, a free and open source graphical file manager. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table at the summary page of this article. Krusader is an advanced, twin-panel (commander-style) file manager designed for KDE Plasma. Krusader also runs on other popular Linux desktop environments such as GNOME. Besides comprehensive file management features, Krusader is almost completely customizable, fast, seamlessly handles archives, and offers a huge feature set. Read more

Android Leftovers

Deepin Linux 15.9 Released with Support for Touchscreen Gestures, Faster Updates

Packed with all the updates that have been released through the official channels since Deepin 15.8, the Deepin 15.9 update is here to add support for multiple touchscreen gestures, including click, double click, long press to open the context menu, as well as slide up and down, an on-screen keyboard, and faster updates thanks to a new Smart Mirror Switch function. The Deepin 15.9 release also brings some performance optimizations by making power management more efficient and convenient to laptop and desktop users alike. "Whether your computer is connected to power supply or not, you can easily change the monitor and computer suspend time for different scenarios," explained the devs in today's announcement. Read more