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Red Hat

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 is Released

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Bridges Hybrid, Multi-Cloud Deployments with Latest Version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4, the latest version of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 offers new automation capabilities designed to limit IT complexity while enhancing workload security and performance for traditional and cloud-native applications. This provides a powerful, flexible operating system backbone to address enterprise IT needs across physical servers, virtual machines and hybrid, public and multi-cloud footprints.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 is here
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 Released

    Red Hat is out today with the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.4 release.

    RHEL 7.4 features a tech preview of "System Roles" as an Ansible-powered common management interface, USB Guard as a means of providing greater control and fending off data leakage/injection, greater container security, various performance improvements, and other updates.

Fedora 24 End of Life

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Red Hat

With the recent release of Fedora 26, Fedora 24 officially enters End Of Life (EOL) status on August 8th, 2017. After August 8th, all packages in the Fedora 24 repositories no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates. Furthermore, no new packages will be added to the Fedora 24 collection.

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Red Hat (RHT) Acquires Permabit Assets

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Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it has acquired the assets and technology of Permabit Technology Corporation, a provider of software for data deduplication, compression and thin provisioning. With the addition of Permabit’s data deduplication and compression capabilities to the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat will be able to better enable enterprise digital transformation through more efficient storage options.

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Analysts Digging into the Details
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Price Pulls Above Balance Step
  • Delving Into The Numbers For Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • FAmSCo August 2017 elections: Thoughts on a global community

    A new release of Fedora makes headlines this month. With every release, it also means a new round of the Fedora community leadership elections. On 24 July 2017, the call for nominations went out for candidates. The Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo), Fedora Ambassador Steering Committee (FAmSCo), and the Fedora Council all have seats open. Already, discussions on nominations are happening. The candidate interview templates are being prepared. Even now, the nomination lists are filling up. However, I want to share an opinion on the upcoming FAmSCo election specifically.

  • 10 Days with Fedora 26 and Mageia 6

    About 13 days ago or so, I posted an entry on my preparations to upgrade Fedora Workstation KDE 25 to Fedora 26.

    My original intention was to do it via CLI, but it did not go well because, after having downloaded all the packages, the system reported insufficient space in / for the install.  Apparently I, being a Fedora noob, had not removed all the old packages and had less than 75 MB left.

Fedora: Python and Flathub/Flatpak Plans

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  • It Will Still Take Fedora A Few More Releases To Switch Off Python 2

    Finalizing Fedora's switch from Python 2 to Python 3 by default is still going to take several more Fedora release cycles and should be done by the 2020 date when Python 2 will be killed off by upstream.

    While much of Fedora's Python code is now compatible with Py3, the /usr/bin/python still points to Python 2, various python-* packages still mean Python 2, and the end game is to eventually get rid of Python 2 from Fedora but that is even further out.

  • Hello again!

    In any case, the main point of this blog post is that I’m at GUADEC in Manchester right now, and I’d like to blog about Flathub, but I thought it would be weird to just show up and say that after 7 years of silence without saying hello again.

  • Welcome, Flathub!

    At the Gtk+ hackfest in London earlier this year, we stole an afternoon from the toolkit folks (sorry!) to talk about Flatpak, and how we could establish a “critical mass” behind the Flatpak format. Bringing Linux container and sandboxing technology together with ostree, we’ve got a technology which solves real world distribution, technical and security problems which have arguably held back the Linux desktop space and frustrated ISVs and app developers for nearly 20 years. The problem we need to solve, like any ecosystem, is one of users and developers – without stuff you can easily get in Flatpak format, there won’t be many users, and without many users, we won’t have a strong or compelling incentive for developers to take their precious time to understand a new format and a new technology.

    [...]

    Enter Flathub. The idea is that by creating an obvious “center of gravity” for the Flatpak community to contribute and build their apps, users will have one place to go and find the best that the Linux app ecosystem has to offer. We can take care of the boring stuff like running a build service and empower Linux application developers to choose how and when their app gets out to their users. After the London hackfest we sketched out a minimum viable system – Github, Buildbot and a few workers – and got it going over the past few months, culminating in a mini-fundraiser to pay for the hosting of a production-ready setup. Thanks to the 20 individuals who supported our fundraiser, to Mythic Beasts who provided a server along with management, monitoring and heaps of bandwidth, and to Codethink and Scaleway who provide our ARM and Intel workers respectively.

Fedora Leftovers and Projects

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Red Hat
  • Packettracer 7 in Fedora 26

    Cisco Packet Tracer 7.0 is created by Cisco SystemsTM and is now provided for free distribution. Self learners are now able to download Cisco Packet Tracer after registering on Cisco Netacad website. A free Packet Tracer 101 (English), a 1-hour self-paced online course is also offered to every registered (free) student to help them get started with PacketTracer 7.0, So you can register and download from here.

  • GSoC2017 (Fedora) — Week 5-8
  • Reaching Beyond My Screen

    I’ve been involved with Women’s Leadership Community (WLC) at Red Hat since starting my first internship last summer and about a week and a half ago (maybe two weeks ago) I heard about an opportunity that I just could not turn down. This opportunity came in the form of an outreach and mentoring-type program hosted at Boston University (BU) called the Artemis Project. The Artemis Project is coordinated by a group of four female undergraduate students studying computer science or engineering at BU to expose Boston-area 9th grade girls to the traditionally made-dominated fields referred to as STEM (science, technology, engineering, math).

    The folks at Artemis reached out to Red Hat in search for a couple of women willing to speak to the girls and I, having spoken about STEM initiatives for women and served as a coordinator for the I Hate Math: Women in STEM Conference at Southern New Hampshire University, immediately responded that I wanted to be involved! My friend, colleague, and fellow designer Laura Wright also volunteered to speak, so we decided to use this platform to draw connections between graphic design and computer science.

SystemD Wins Award for Insecurity

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Red Hat
  • Linux SystemD Wins Pwnie Award at Black Hat, and No It's Not a Good Thing

    Some awards are better than others. When it comes to security awards, the Pwnie Awards can sometimes be a good thing to win and other times - not so much.

  • Systemd wins top gong for 'lamest vendor' in Pwnie security awards

    The annual Pwnie Awards for serious security screw-ups saw hardly anyone collecting their prize at this year's ceremony in Las Vegas.

    That's not surprising: government officials, US spy agencies, and software makers aren’t usually in the mood to acknowledge their failures.

    The Pwnies give spray-painted pony statues to those who have either pulled off a great hack or failed epically. This year it was nation states that got a significant proportion of the prizes. The gongs are divided into categories, and nominations in each section are voted on by the hacker community. The ponies are then dished out every year at the Black Hat USA security conference in Sin City.

Fedora: Fedora Classroom, Fedora Media Writer

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Classroom Sessions are here!

    The Fedora Join SIG is proud to announce Classroom sessions. The Fedora Classroom is a project to teach interested users how to better use, understand and manage their Fedora system, and to show how the community works. The idea is to reach interested people and, if they desire, bring them closer to the Fedora community.

    Almost all classes will be held on IRC in the #fedora-classroom channel on Freenode (irc.freenode.net). If you’re not familiar with IRC, check out the Beginner’s guide to IRC. Also we’ll use BlueJeans, a video conferencing platform that works from browsers, mobile devices and a desktop application. If you have trouble connecting to Blue Jeans, please refer to the support page.

  • Fedora Media Writer – A Necessary Tool for the Fedora User

    Suppose that you have decided that you want to give the new Fedora release a try. You download the ISO and then you have to pick a method of putting that ISO on a thumb drive.

    You could choose to use the dd command or you could pick from a series of applications. However, with Fedora, you have only one option: Fedora Media Writer.

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The Red Hat Way

  • Red Hat wants to make cold-shouldered OpenStack red hot
    At OpenStack Summit in Boston last May, some speculated that the event might be the last gasp for OpenStack — an open-source platform for cloud computing and infrastructure-as-service. Granted, OpenStack was one of the less hyped open-source projects of the past year. But renewed community and end-user interest is breathing fresh life into the platform, according to Rob Young (pictured), senior manager of virtualization product and strategy at Red Hat Inc. Telcos and others are adopting OpenStack “because of the simplification of what was once complex, but also in the cost savings that can be realized by managing your own cloud within a hybrid cloud environment,” Young said.
  • Improved multimedia support with Pipewire in Fedora 27
    Pipewire — a new project of underlying Linux infrastructure to handle multimedia better — has just been officially launched. The project’s main goal is to improve the handling of both audio and video. Additionally, Pipewire introduces a security model to allow easy interaction with multimedia devices from containerized and sandboxed applications, i.e. Flatpak apps.
  • Architecting the future with abstractions and metadata
    The modern data center is built on abstractions, with Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift leading the way.

Games: Racing Games, Steam, SteamWorld Dig 2, XCOM 2: War of the Chosen

Software: DNS Checkers, Alternatives to Adobe Software, Fake Hollywood Hacker Terminal and More