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Red Hat

Fedora: Fedora Workstation Improvements and New PHP Versions

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  • Fedora 29 Succeeds At Flicker-Free Boot Experience On Intel Hardware

    After optimizing the Linux laptop battery life last cycle, Hans de Goede of Red Hat has been working on Fedora 29 to provide a "flicker-free" boot experience. A Linux desktop flicker-free boot has been talked about for a decade or longer but with Fedora 29 and using Intel graphics that is finally becoming a reality.

    The premise of the long desired flicker-free boot is to maintain the same resolution/mode-set from the system boot through the desktop loading without any unnecessary mode-set operations or sudden graphics changes in order to provide a smooth boot experience.

  • Announcing flickerfree boot for Fedora 29

    A big project I've been working on recently for Fedora Workstation is what we call flickerfree boot. The idea here is that the firmware lights up the display in its native mode and no further modesets are done after that. Likewise there are also no unnecessary jarring graphical transitions.

    Basically the machine boots up in UEFI mode, shows its vendor logo and then the screen keeps showing the vendor logo all the way to a smooth fade into the gdm screen. Here is a video of my main workstation booting this way.

  • PHP version 7.1.23RC1 and 7.2.11RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in remi-test repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages.

Red Hat News and Fedora 29 Atomic Test Day Next Week

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Indeni to Participate in Red Hat Ansible Automation Community

    Indeni, provider of the crowd-sourced network automation platform, today announced its sponsorship of AnsibleFest 2018 to showcase the collaboration between Indeni and Red Hat Ansible Automation around initiatives designed to benefit IT operations and help advance network automation solutions.

  • Red Hat debuts infrastructure migration

    Red Hat is introducing an offering to help provide an open pathway to digital transformation.

    Designed to help enterprises cut costs and speed innovation through cloud-native and container-based technologies, Red Hat infrastructure migration solution enables enterprises to break down closed technology silos centered on proprietary virtualisation.

  • Orange Launches 'X By Orange' Venture with Red Hat's 'Cloud-Native' Tech

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that X By Orange, a subsidiary of Orange Spain focused on business-to-business (B2B) digital services, selected Red Hat as a core technology partner to help create its software-defined strategy with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform in collaboration with Red Hat Consulting. With the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform, X by Orange is building a greenfield, cloud-native platform, enabling the service provider to embrace DevOps and agile development and more rapidly create and deliver digital services to business customers.

  • Red Hat OpenShift Helps Make X by Orange’s Hardware-Free Vision of Business Communications Services a Reality
  • Source versus binary S2I workflows with Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes

    Red Hat OpenShift supports two workflows for building container images for applications: the source and the binary workflows. The binary workflow is the primary focus of the Red Hat OpenShift Application Runtimes and Red Hat Fuse product documentation and training, while the source workflow is the focus of most of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform product documentation and training. All of the standard OpenShift Quick Application Templates are based on the source workflow.

    A developer might ask, “Can I use both workflows on the same project?” or, “Is there a reason to prefer one workflow over the other?” As a member of the team that developed Red Hat certification training for OpenShift and Red Hat Fuse, I had these questions myself and I hope that this article helps you find your own answers to these questions.

  • Aging like milk, not wine: The realities of container security

    In many ways, age brings refinement. Wine, cheese, and, in some cases, people, all improve as they grow older. But in the world of enterprise IT, age has a different connotation. Aged systems and software, can bring irrelevance and technical debt and, at worst, increased security risks. With the rise of Linux containers as a functional underpinning to the digitally-transforming enterprise, the ill effects of technological age are front and center.

    To think of it more simply: Containers age like milk, not like wine. Think of it in terms of food: Milk is a key component in cooking, from baking to sauces. If the milk sours or goes bad, so to does the recipe. The same things happens to containers, especially as they are being looked to as key components for production systems. A stale or “soured” container could ruin an otherwise promising deployment.

  • Sticking with HEAD on OpenShift with Image Streams

    Many modern developers have learned that ‘sticking with HEAD’ (the most recent stable release) can be the best way to keep their application more secure. In this new ‘devops’ world there’s a fine line between using the latest and greatest, and breaking changes introduced by an upgrade. In this post we’ll explore some configuration options in Red Hat OpenShift which can make keeping up with the latest release easier, while reducing the impact of breaking changes. For more information on image streams I encourage you to read the source-to-image FAQ by Maciej Szulik.

    [...]

    Using scheduled source-to-image base image streams, along with a build configuration which disables ImageChange triggers, we can strike a nice balance between “sticking with head”, and avoiding breaking changes. Consider updating the pre-installed image streams in the ‘openshift’ project to allow your developers get the latest security updates in language runtimes and build tools.

    While I used CentOS images for demonstration purposes in this post, I’d recommend using RHEL images for your production applications. The Red Hat Container Catalogue contains regularly updated and certified container images, fully supported by Red Hat.

  • Security Technologies: FORTIFY_SOURCE

    FORTIFY_SOURCE provides lightweight compile and runtime protection to some memory and string functions (original patch to gcc was submitted by Red Hat). It is supposed to have no or a very small runtime overhead and can be enabled for all applications and libraries in an operating system. The concept is basically universal meaning it can be applied to any operating system, but there are glibc specific patches available in gcc-4 onwards. In gcc, FORTIFY_SOURCE normally works by replacing some string and memory functions with their *_chk counterparts (builtins). These functions do the necessary calculations to determine an overflow. If an overflow is found, the program is aborted; otherwise control is passed to the corresponding string or memory operation functions. Again all this is normally done in assembly so the overhead is really minimal.

  • Empowered, inspired and energized at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing

    Six years ago, when Red Hat sponsored the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing (GHC) event for the first time, we had a small presence. There were just five Red Hatters in attendance! Being new to the event, few people knew who we were, and they were even less were familiar with open source. It was an exciting time to join this event, because across the industry, the topic of women in tech was beginning to gain momentum.

    Today the idea of diversity and inclusion isn’t a new topic, but it’s still a crucial one. The role that women play in tech and the importance of creating a strong pipeline of talent will be something the industry will need to continue to address.

  • Red Hat (RHT) and Weibo (WB) Financial Survey
  • Notable Stock’s Buzzers: E*TRADE Financial Corporation, (NASDAQ: ETFC), Red Hat, Inc., (NYSE: RHT)
  • Let’s Make some Money with Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat Inc to Post Q3 2019 Earnings of $0.63 Per Share, Oppenheimer Forecasts (RHT)
  • Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) Risk Points versus Technology (XLK)
  • Fedora reawakens the hibernation debate

    Behavioral changes can make desktop users grumpy; that is doubly true for changes that arrive without notice and possibly risk data loss. Such a situation recently arose in the Fedora 29 development branch in the form of a new "suspend-then-hibernate" feature. This feature will almost certainly be turned off before Fedora 29 reaches an official release, but the discussion and finger-pointing it inspired reveal some significant differences of opinion about how this kind of change should be managed.

  • Fedora 29 Beta

    As is my habit, I upgraded my laptop at Beta time. dnf system-upgrade didn’t work for me because of some dependency issues. In the process of working through a dnf upgrade, I discovered that it was due to some odd homegrown Python RPMs I’d made and forgotten about, and gource, which was still FBTBS. After working those out, it was uneventful.

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Announcing the release of Fedora 29 Beta

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Red Hat

The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Fedora 29 Beta, the next big step on our journey to the exciting Fedora 29 release.

Download the prerelease from our Get Fedora site:

Get Fedora 29 Beta Workstation
Get Fedora 29 Beta Server
Get Fedora 29 Beta Atomic
Get Fedora 29 Beta Silverblue

Or, check out one of our popular variants, including KDE Plasma, Xfce, and other desktop environments, as well as images for ARM devices like the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3...

Read more

Also: Fedora Linux 29 beta rolls out

Fedora and Red Hat News: Test Day, Fedora 29 Beta, Istio, Java and Microsoft Blobs

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  • Test Day: Java 8,10,11

    Test Day will focus on OpenJDK 11 and OpenJDK 10. Currently, we have java-1.8.0-openjdk as main JDK in Fedora. It accompanied java-1.7.0-openjdk as JRE for a year, and replaced it in buildroot in F21. Similarly, as did java-1.7.0-openjdk to java-1.6.0-openjdk in F16 as parallel JRE and replaced it in F17 in build root and main JDK. However, today the situation is more complicated. Oracle changed release process, see OpenJDK 11 summary and OpenJDK 10 summary, so currently, in F27 and up, you have java-1.8.0-openjdk as main JDK, java-openjdk as rolling release of STS JDK 10, and java-11-openjdk as techpreview of future LTS JDK. Javaws is provided in another package – icedtea-web

  • Fedora 29 Is On Track With A Lot Of Changes

    With Fedora 29 Beta set to ship today, here's a reminder about some of the great changes on the way with this next installment of the Fedora Linux distribution that is on track to officially release around the end of October.

    - GNOME 3.30 makes up the default desktop environment and the many improvements to the GNOME Shell / Mutter and all the contained components.

  • Red Hat weaves Istio’s Service Mesh into OpenShift

    If you were thinking that what Red Hat’s Openshift platform really needs is a service mesh, your prayers have been answered, courtesy of Istio. As long you don’t actually plan to use it in production anytime soon.

    Red Hatter Erik Jacobs said in a blog post yesterday that the firm had unleashed the first technology preview of the Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh, and that it was based on the Google, IBM and Lyft-backed Istio.

    Istio is designed to take the complexity of managing microservices architectures away from the application developer or DevOps team. Istio’s backers pitch it as taking care of load balancing and monitoring, as well handling authentication and communications between services, access and traffic control.

  • 6 personality traits driving your organization
  • Scaling Java Containers

    As enterprises increasingly adopt the advantages of deploying containerized applications, it is important to address the potential misconception that the JVM does not play nicely in the cloud. While it is true that most JVMs may not come out of the box perfectly configured to run in an elastic cloud environment, the wide variety of system properties available allows the JVM to be tuned to get the most out of a host environment. If a containerized application is deployed using Red Hat OpenShift, the application could take advantage of the Kubernetes Vertical Pod Autoscaler (VPA), which is an alpha feature. The VPA is a perfect example of where the JVM’s default memory management settings could diminish the increased resource utilization offered by such a feature. This blog post will walk through the steps of configuring and testing a containerized Java application for use with the VPA, which demonstrates the inherent adaptability of the JVM to cloud platforms.

  • A certified sequel: SQL Server on Red Hat’s cloud-native technologies [Ed: "Mike Ferris is vice president of business architecture at Red Hat." Now he's selling nonfree software (likely with back doors) from Microsoft]
  • FY2019 EPS Estimates for Red Hat Inc Raised by William Blair (RHT)
  • Enthralling Stocks: Ensco plc, (NYSE: ESV), Red Hat, Inc., (NYSE: RHT)

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Getting the team together to revolutionize Linux audio

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GNOME

So anyone reading my blog posts would probably have picked up on my excitement for the PipeWire project, the effort to unify the world of Linux audio, add an equivalent video bit and provide multimedia handling capabilities to containerized applications. The video part as I have mentioned before was the critical first step and that is starting to look really good with the screen sharing functionality in GNOME shell already using PipeWire and equivalent PipeWire support being added to KDE by Jan Grulich. We have internal patches for both Firefox and Chrome(ium) which we are polishing up to propose them upstream, but we will in the meantime offer them as downstream patches in Fedora as soon as they are ready for primetime. Once those patches are deployed you should have any browser based desktop sharing software, like Google Hangouts, working fully under Wayland (and X).

Read more

Red Hat News

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  • The future of Java and OpenJDK updates without Oracle support

    Oracle recently announced that it would no longer supply free (as in beer) binary downloads for JDK releases after a six-month period, and neither would Oracle engineers write patches for OpenJDK bugs after that period. This has caused a great deal of concern among some Java users.

    From my point of view, this is little more than business as usual. Several years ago, the OpenJDK 6 updates (jdk6u) project was relinquished by Oracle and I assumed leadership, and then the same happened with OpenJDK 7. Subsequently, Andrew Brygin of Azul took over the leadership of OpenJDK 6. The OpenJDK Vulnerability Group, with members from many organizations, collaborates on critical security issues. With the help of the wider OpenJDK community and my team at Red Hat, we have continued to provide updates for critical bugs and security vulnerabilities at regular intervals. I can see no reason why this process should not work in the same way for OpenJDK 8 and the next long-term support release, OpenJDK 11.

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: Deep Dive AIOps, Autoscaling and Scheduling on OpenShift with Jeremy Wei (Prophetstor)

    In this briefing, Prophetstor’s Jeremy Wei demonstrate using AIOps technologies to empower OpenShift scaler/scheduler to help ensure the operation of containers, and eliminate noisy neighbors by accurately predicting resource demand/ supply, performance and HW failure.

  • Istio on OpenShift: Technology Preview of Service Mesh Now Available

    We’re happy to announce the availability of our first technology preview of the Red Hat OpenShift Service Mesh, based on the Istio Project.

    The advancement of application/software development practices combined with technology/practice improvements in software delivery have resulted in a proliferation of application instances within many organizations. Whether these are macro/monoliths, “mini” services, or microservices, as the quantity of services increases, both the number and complexity of interactions increases.

    Until now much of the burden of managing these complex services interactions has been placed on the application developer. The evolution of sets of libraries like the Netflix Common Runtime Services & Libraries have brought many features and benefits for application resiliency, traffic control, etc. However, the use of these libraries is runtime-dependent (eg: Netflix’ libraries are Java-based) and they must be integrated into the application by the developer.

  • How open source game development hones valuable skills

    Two weeks ago I sat down with Michael Clayton and Jared Sprague to talk about Command Line Heroes: The Game. If you missed that post—have no fear—it is (of course) still available.

    But wait, why are we talking about games? In large part it’s because we’ve spent the last 12 months on the road asking people about their origin stories. And, after hundreds of interviews, we’ve come to understand that for many (but not all) their introduction to technology and/or computing started with video games. This inspired us to start Command Line Heroes season 2 with “Press Start,” an episode about how open source and video games share an origin story—one that takes place long before the terms “open source” and “internet” were even coined.

  • The Importance of a Nanosecond: Remembering Grace Hopper

    In the mid 1980s I was a young software engineer at Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). Admiral Grace Hopper in those days worked for Digital as a consultant, mostly a goodwill ambassador.

    Similar to Red Hat's annual Summit conference, Digital ran an event called DECUS. And it was paired with an internal event called, imaginatively enough, Internal DECUS. Having spent two weeks installing and configuring every software product that Digital made onto a very overloaded VAX 11/730, I was hovering on the Internal DECUS show floor making sure the demos didn't crash.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Stock Could Break Resistance and Hit $135.81
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Shares Bought by Stephens Investment Management Group LLC
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today's leftovers

  • freenode #live 2018 - Doc Searls and Simon Phipps - In Conversation
  • How to edit themes in Linux Mint Cinnamon - Tutorial
  • KDE Bugsquad – Okular Bug Day on November 17th, 2018
    Thank you to everyone who participated last Bug Day! We had a turnout of about six people, who worked through about half of the existing REPORTED (unconfirmed) Konsole bugs. Lots of good discussion occurred on #kde-bugs as well, thank you for joining the channel and being part of the team! We will be holding a Bug Day on November 17th, 2018, focusing on Okular. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!
  • Omarine 5.3 released! (Nov 14 2018)
    This release updates dbus and glib together with all dependencies and related packages. Some of them are rebuilt, the rest are upgraded. Glib 2.58.1 can be considered a development threshold because many dependent packages must be caught it up. Below is a list of some typically upgraded packages:
  • Achievement unlocked! I spoke at PythonBrasil[14]
    PythonBrasil is the national Python community conference that happens every year, usually in October, in Brazil. I attended PythonBrasil for the first time in 2016, the year we had started PyLadies Porto Alegre. Back then, we were a very small group and I was the only one to go. It was definitely one of the best experiences I ever had, which, of course, set a very high standard for every single tech event I attended afterwards. Because of the great time I had there, I wanted to bring more and more women from PyLadies Porto Alegre to experience PythonBrasil in the next editions. So, during the PyLadies Porto Alegre 1st birthday party, I encouraged the other women to submit activities to try and to go to the conference that would happen in Belo Horizonte.
  • Browser Based Open Source Image Optimization Tool Squoosh Comes To Google Lab’s Latest Release
    Open source, browser-based image optimization tool Squoosh is Google’s new Chrome Lab release. This new web tool is meant to make web developers work a lot simpler to optimize web pages. Images loading in a website is usually the reason for them to take so long to load and Squoosh helps web developers shrink the image so that it consumes lesser data. Squoosh can downsize, compress, and reformat images. Its purpose is to make web developers’ work less tedious and hence quicker. Google chrome labs made this tool available offline and said it would be handy to have this tool work offline. Squoosh also supports editing image codecs that are not normally available in the browser.
  • VS Code Live Share plugin [Ed: When GNU/Linux sites help Microsoft]
  • Microsoft Releases Open-Source HLSL to GLSL Shader Cross-Compiler [Ed: As above, except this is just openwashing of proprietary DX]
  • Upgrading OpenBSD 6.3 to 6.4 on Vultr
  • iGNUit has a new homepage address
  • gxmessage has a new homepage
  • It Looks Like The Raptor Blackbird Open-Source Motherboard Will Sell For Just Under $900
    Many have been curious to learn more about the Blackbird from Raptor Computing Systems as a lower-cost POWER9, open-source hardware alternative to their higher-end Talos II hardware that we've been recently benchmarking. The possible price has been revealed.  Overnight, Raptor Computing Systems tweeted a straw poll looking to gauge the interest level in "Would you pre-order a Raptor Computing Systems Blackbird system or board this year at a mainboard cost of $875?"
  • C++20 Making Progress On Modules, Memory Model Updates
    This past week was an ISO C++ committee meeting in San Diego, which happened to be their largest meeting ever, and they managed to accomplish a lot in drafting more planned changes around the C++20 language update.