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Red Hat

Lennart Poettering: Walkthrough for Portable Services in Go

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Development
Red Hat

A few months ago I posted a blog story with a walkthrough of systemd Portable Services. The example service given was written in C, and the image was built with mkosi. In this blog story I'd like to revisit the exercise, but this time focus on a different aspect: modern programming languages like Go and Rust push users a lot more towards static linking of libraries than the usual dynamic linking preferred by C (at least in the way C is used by traditional Linux distributions).

Static linking means we can greatly simplify image building: if we don't have to link against shared libraries during runtime we don't have to include them in the portable service image. And that means pretty much all need for building an image from a Linux distribution of some kind goes away as we'll have next to no dependencies that would require us to rely on a distribution package manager or distribution packages. In fact, as it turns out, we only need as few as three files in the portable service image to be fully functional.

So, let's have a closer look how such an image can be put together. All of the following is available in this git repository.

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Preparing for Fedora Workstation 30

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Red Hat

I just installed the Fedora Workstation 30 Beta yesterday and so far things are looking great. As many others have reported to, with the GNOME 3.32 update things definitely feels faster and smoother. So I thought it was a good time to talk about what is coming in Fedora Workstation 30 and what we are currently working on.

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • Announcing Red Hat CodeReady Studio, the latest evolution of Red Hat Developer Studio

    Red Hat has been shipping a distribution of Eclipse IDE for years now, including all of the great features of Eclipse along with the add-ons, plugins, and tooling that make working with our products easy and enjoyable. These distributions have gone by different names over the years to indicate how they fit into the Red Hat ecosystem, and to tap into the trust that developers have when they think about Red Hat and what a Red Hat product means for them: it’ll be reliable; it’ll have a published lifecycle; it’s built from source; and if you submit a bug, we’ll fix it (and give the fix to the community). This change is no different.

  • Announcing Red Hat CodeReadyStudio 12.11.0.GA and JBoss Tools 4.11.0.Final for Eclipse 2019-03

    JBoss Tools 4.11.0 and Red Hat CodeReady Studio 12.11 for Eclipse 2019-03 are here and are waiting for you. In this article, I’ll cover the highlights of the new releases and show how to get started.

  • And even more keynotes at Red Hat Summit 2019

    Every year, the mainstage at Red Hat Summit overflows with stories about the powerful role enterprise open source tools can play in a company's digital strategy. Speakers from across industries, sectors—even countries—take the floor to explain how they're using open tools to build better solutions—for themselves and their customers.

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, that won't change. Today we're announcing the next round of keynote speakers to appear in Boston, May 7‒9. Join us to hear how open source is making a difference in industries ranging from telecommunications and finance to healthcare.

  • Red Hat and 2nd Generation Intel Xeon Scalable Processors enable 5G and Edge Services

    Through the evolution to 5G, telecommunications service providers (SPs) will be continuing the transformation of their core networks and data center assets to cloud-native network function virtualization infrastructure (NFVI) and software-defined networking (SDN) capabilities. The modernization of the core network which already started during the 4G/LTE time frame is extending to include the edge of the network.

  • The making of Creating ChRIS:Building a logo identity and designing the web experience

    Joseph Schlosser, art director, and Aaron Williamson, web designer, discuss how the distinct visual style of the video series was extended into the logo and web page. Aaron considers the use of a wider color palette and Joseph talks about working as a cross functional team.

    We've included a snapshot of the conversation, but you can also listen to the full conversation with our embedded player or download the MP3.

  • Test Day: Fedora Silverblue

Fedora 30 Beta is here -- try the next version of the best Linux distro now

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Red Hat

Fedora is the best overall Linux distribution. It's really not up for debate -- even the father of Linux, Linus Torvalds uses it. The focus of the operating system is truly free and open source software, making it one of the most pure experiences. And while there are many flavors to choose with various desktop environments, the default is GNOME -- the overall best DE. While Fedora maybe isn't the best distro for beginners, it should be the eventual choice for those that "level up" to being an experienced Linux user later.

Today, after a bit of a delay, Fedora 30 is finally available for download. Details are a bit sparse regarding new features, but we will add them as we know more. What we do know, however, is the Workstation variant (which is what most users care about) uses GNOME 3.32 -- the latest and greatest version of that desktop environment.

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Also: Ben Williams: F29-20190329 updated Live isos Released [Ed: New builds/ISOs of Fedora 29 are available]

5 Cool New Projects to Try in Fedora Linux

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Red Hat

In this article, we will share five cool new projects to try in Fedora Linux distribution. Note that some of these projects may also be work on other mainstream Linux distributions such as Ubuntu and CentOS.

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Red Hat on Desktop (LVFS) and Server

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Red Hat
  • The Linux Vendor Firmware Service Marks a Major Milestone

    Leveraging the LVFS (and the open-source fwupd tool), Linux distributions like Ubuntu allow users to install firmware updates alongside regular software and OS updates.

    The Software app is able to scan the service’s database to find firmware updates for compatible/attached hardware, then offer to download and install it — no manufacturer-specific flashing tools required.

  • LVFS Served Up 500k Firmware Files To Linux Users This Month

    Back in February the Linux Vendor Firmware Service (LVFS) was celebrating having served more than five million firmware files over the duration of this service for providing BIOS/firmware files to Linux users for different hardware components from different vendors ranging from mice/peripheral firmware to new system/motherboard BIOS from major hardware vendors. That count is quickly shooting up these days and they are now serving 500k files per month.

    Richard Hughes, the lead developer of LVFS/Fwupd at Red Hat, shared they hit a new record of serving 0.5 million firmware files over the past month.

  • The impact of the GDPR - privacy matters

    For anyone working in the privacy space, 2018 can be summed up with four letters: GDPR. The General Data Protection Regulation’s implementation date of May 25, 2018, will forever be etched in the minds of many as the date that the European Union adopted a comprehensive and far-reaching privacy law.

    On reflection, the GDPR was truly a watershed moment for global privacy law. Not only because of the rights and protections it provides to individuals in the European Union, but because — less than a year later — the GDPR has inspired other governments to consider similar legislation. New privacy laws are coming into effect in California, Brazil and possibly other U.S. states and countries, and these laws share many of the same principles of the GDPR.

  • Red Hat Summit 2019 Labs: Cloud-native app dev roadmap

    Red Hat Summit 2019 is rocking Boston, MA, May 7-9 in the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center. This event offers everything you need to know about the current state of open source, enterprise-ready software. You’ll find customers talking about leveraging open source in their solutions, and you’ll meet the creators of open source technologies and get to experience their hands-on labs.

    The following labs can be found in the session catalog online, by searching on the session title or filtering on “instructor-led lab” and “cloud-native app dev” content. You can also learn more about the Cloud-Native App Dev track sessions in this article.

IBM's Red Hat buy 'shows future importance of open source'

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Red Hat
Server

Ahead of the company's annual conference, SUSECON, which will be held in Nashville, Tennessee, from 1 to 5 April, Andy Jiang, SUSE vice-president and general manager Asia Pacific and Japan, told iTWire in response to queries that SUSE, now an independent business, was in a good position to work closely with its partners and customers to ensure that they could benefit from the "freedom and flexibility" of enterprise open source solutions.

Asked whether SUSE had now decided to adopt a more aggressive attitude towards the competition — as exemplified in a blog post made recently by Ryan Hagen, consulting manager, Global SUSE Services, about loud infrastructure and business mobility vendor VMware — Jiang did not give a direct answer, but said...

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Servers: IBM, Red Hat and SUSE

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Don't count out IBM virtualization on the Z platform
  • IBM-Red Hat merger timing, fairness in question

    Red Hat posted 2019 year-end financial results this week that exceeded analyst expectations, but the company said nothing about its pending $34 billion purchase by IBM as industry experts question the value to Linux users and whether the deal will actually close in the second half of this year.

    While major roadblocks to the IBM-Red Hat merger have yet to become public, its sheer size has some industry observers in speculation mode.

    "If this deal doesn't go through, it wouldn't be a problem for anyone except IBM," said Dana Gardner, principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions LLC in Gilford, N.H. "People are quite happy with an independent Red Hat overseeing the development of an important product like Linux along with a cloud software infrastructure stack."

    For the most part, IT pros weren't excited about the deal because of what IBM brings to Red Hat, but what Red Hat brings to IBM, Gardner said. This is reflected in the "staggering" $34 billion IBM paid for Red Hat, he added.

  • Going to SUSECON ’19? Get $5!

    Have you been coveting your very own SUSE chameleon? How about a pair of SUSE socks? Or maybe it’s a notebook that you want to take home? The options to turn your office green are endless. And to jumpstart your journey, the Support team wants to give you $5!

  • Six First Impressions of SUSE Cloud Application Platform

    While I’ve been developing for Kubernetes for a few years now, I am pretty new to both SUSE and Cloud Foundry. I’ve got to say that both have been great experiences! SUSE is a fantastic place to work and our Cloud Foundry distribution (SUSE Cloud Application Platform) makes my development life easier.

  • A Syllabus to SUSE CaaS Platform at SUSECON

    NASHVILLE, BABY!!! That’s right, I’m hitting my old college stomping grounds for SUSECON!!
    Returning to Nashville brings me memories of housing Ben and Jerry’s Stephen Colbert Americone Dream from the Piggly Wiggly after learning that Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce were traded away from the Celtics, finding the single Dunkin’ Donuts in Nashville and moving into the apartment building next to it, blasting Jay Z’s Reasonable Doubt out of my dorm room windows, and paying more attention to the girl who sat next to me in ECON 2 than my professor (Sorry, Dr. C…)

    Ah man. Those were the days…

    Anyway, SUSECON! I’m the PMM for SUSE CaaS Platform! That’s what I’m here to write about!

  • Is Kubernetes The Next Big Enterprise App Platform? That Depends On How Many Apps Can Run On It

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • The making of Creating ChRIS: Developing a distinct visual and narrative style

    Casey Stegman, writer, Eric Kramer, animator, and Kieran Moreira, director, talk about finding inspiration and setting the tone during the creative process. Casey discusses how they developed the style of the film, Kieran walks through the decision to use specific video equipment to support the overall style, and Eric considers how the graphics were integrated.

    We've included a snapshot of the conversation, but you can also listen to the full conversation with our embedded player or download the MP3.

  • OperatorHub.io Operator Round-Up

    In the few short weeks since Operator Hub launched, there have been many additions to the site’s trove of Kubernetes Operators. They offer services for your Kubernetes cluster ranging from etcd and CockroachDB, to Jaeger Tracing and Dynatrace. Like spring flowers, Operators have popped up from the open source community soil. We wanted to gather up all of our existing Operators Blog coverage and deep-dives into one post, today, in preparation for a significant uptick n the number of available Operators as spring turns into summer.

    By the end of the summer, Operatorhub.io should be filled with Operators for all manner of services and enterprise-ready systems. Of course, you’ll be able to read about all those new additions here, where we’ll highlight newcomers along with deeper technical content when available. Before that happens, (and as we all know, software delivery estimation is really hard!) we wanted to round up all of the information we’ve thus far published on Operators to help you get up to speed with what’s already there before the fresh bloom of new software.

  • ShadowReader: Serverless load tests for replaying production traffic

    While load testing has become more accessible, configuring load tests that faithfully re-create production conditions can be difficult. A good load test must use a set of URLs that are representative of production traffic and achieve request rates that mimic real users. Even performing distributed load tests requires the upkeep of a fleet of servers.

    ShadowReader aims to solve these problems. It gathers URLs and request rates straight from production logs and replays them using AWS Lambda. Being serverless, it is more cost-efficient and performant than traditional distributed load tests; in practice, it has scaled beyond 50,000 requests per minute.

    At Edmunds, we have been able to utilize these capabilities to solve problems, such as Node.js memory leaks that were happening only in production, by recreating the same conditions in our QA environment. We're also using it daily to generate load for pre-production canary deployments.

    The memory leak problem we faced in our Node.js application confounded our engineering team; as it was only occurring in our production environment; we could not reproduce it in QA until we introduced ShadowReader to replay production traffic into QA.

  • New AppStream Validation Requirements
  • Broadway adventures in Gtk4

    One of my long running side projects is a Gtk backend called “Broadway”. Instead of rendering to the screen this backend creates a HTTP server that you can connect to, and then exposes the UI remotely in the browser.

    The original version of broadway was essentially streaming image frames, although there were various ways to optimize what got sent. This matches pretty well with how Gtk 3 rendering works, particularly on Wayland. Every frame it calls out to all widgets, letting them draw on top of a buffer and then sends the final frame to the compositor. Broadway just inserts some image delta computation and JavaScript magic in the middle of this.

My Outreachy 2019 experience with Fedora Happiness Packets: Contribution phase

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Red Hat

Outreachy is a program that provides internships to work in Free and Open Source Software (FOSS). Outreachy internships are open to applicants around the world. Interns work remotely, and are not required to move. Interns are paid a stipend of $5,500 USD for the three month internship. Interns have a $500 USD travel stipend to attend conferences or events.

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Also: Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-13

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.