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Red Hat

Fedora 29 and Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Bubblewrap Security Feature Will Be Removed From Ubuntu and CentOS

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu and CentOS are disabling a security feature which was added to the GNOME Desktop environment last year. The Security feature named Bubblewrap creates a sandbox environment that secures GNOME’s thumbnail parsers.

Thumbnail parsers are the scripts that read files inside a folder and create a thumbnail image that can be used with the GNOME, KDE and different Linux Desktop Environments. The operation takes place whenever the user navigates to directories within the OS where there is a need to display thumbnail images.

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Red Hat Business News

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Red Hat's Business News

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Fedora/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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  • Maxta Introduces A Hyperconverged Red Hat Virtualization Offering

    On August 22nd, Maxta Inc announced a pre-configured system of Red Hat Virtualization software and Maxta Hyperconvergence software bundled together on Intel Data Center Blocks hardware. Maxta specializes in hyperconverged software like this and will be demoing it next week at VMworld, booth #1518.

  • Red Hat infrastructure migration solution for proprietary and siloed infrastructure

    Red Hat recently introduced its infrastructure migration solution to help provide an open pathway to digital transformation. Red Hat infrastructure migration solution provides an enterprise-ready pathway to cloud-native application development via Linux containers, Kubernetes, automation, and other open source technologies. It helps organizations to accelerate transformation by more safely migrating and managing workload to an open source infrastructure platform, thus reducing cost and speeding innovation.

  • OVS-DPDK: Migrating to vhostuser socket mode in Red Hat OpenStack

    In the Newton release, the default vhostuser mode in Open vSwitch (OvS) is dpdkvhostuser. In Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 GA, and subsequent updates till 29th June, the default vhostuser mode is dpdkvhostuser. With the latest update to OSP10 (post 29th June 2018), the default mode has been changed to dpdkvhostuserclient. This post provides the information on vhostuser migration and verifying the vhostuser modes of the VMs created with dpdkvhostuser mode.

    In order to understand the difference between the two modes and the advantage of moving to dpdkvhostuserclient mode, read the OvS documentation onvhostuser modes. In short, vhostuser allows Qemu to fetch/put network data to OvS-DPDK without overloading Qemu with the translation. And the vhostuser socket is a UNIX domain socket, created to establish the communication between Qemu and OvS-DPDK. This communication follows a specific messaging format detailed in theQemu's vhost user document.

  • 2018 C-Suite Award Winners (AH)
  • Flock 2018 Reflections

    Flock 2018 is going down in my books as another successful and wonderful Fedora conference! This year Flock to Fedora was held in Dresden, Germany, August 8-11th. I am so thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of this community for another year, and to have the chance to see the impact my contributions make. This year, I attended with the determination to interact more with different parts of the community outside of Fedora design. I made it my goal to liaise with people from other teams to hear their experiences, stories, and to learn how Fedora Badges could help improve each initiative and the project as a whole. Overall, I think I was successful in this venture and would like to share some of the experiences I had.

  • FPgM report: 2018-34

Red Hat and Fedora: Aim at VMware, Containers, Maxta, Flock 2018 and IBus 1.5.19

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  • Red Hat Takes Virtualization Aim at VMware
  • Red Hat Takes Aim At VMware

    Red Hat thinks VMware is an anchor dragging enterprise IT departments down, and it's looking provide wings to help them soar. The ruby-lidded guys are launching infrastructure migration tools and professional services to migrate "legacy virtualization solutions" (Red Hat's euphemism for the V-team) to open source.

    In a blog post scheduled to go live Thursday, Red Hat Inc. (NYSE: RHT) takes aim at the financial cost of running these "legacy virtualization solutions," and promises to help enterprises "cut costs and speed innovation through cloud-native and container-based technologies." Red Hat says the cost of running legacy infrastructure starves enterprises of the resources needed for digital transformation. Red Hat is looking to fix that.

  • Red Hat Goals To Assist Firms Migrate To A Modern IT Infrastructure

    Business enterprises nowadays aren’t shy about their desire embrace “digital transformation,” and the companies that provide much of their information technology infrastructure are falling over themselves which is happening again and again.

  • How the Boston Children’s Hospital Is Innovating on Top of an Open Cloud

    Pienaar says that it’s very important that it is all open source and, again, not just because of the cost savings. Having been using Linux from the start of the project, he believes they wouldn’t have access to the different development environments and languages they’d want to use if they were tied to a proprietary cloud.

    “I very much am inspired by the idea that, with these open source approaches, we can build things that really affect data that has real connections to the world behind it,” Pienaar said.

    “Right now if we were trying to collaborate deep down into the Amazon cloud, I would imagine we would have to set up a licensing agreement with Amazon. I wouldn’t be able to download the Amazon Cloud to run up my own environment. And while the full power of ChRIS lies in its connection to the Mass Open Cloud, nothing stops you from downloading and running ChRIS right now on your laptop. The entire ChRIS is available. Your experience is identical — albeit your laptop might not quite muster the grade for heavy computing. Still, you can troubleshoot and develop to your own mini-but-complete ChRIS in totality and then with a click deploy to any number of other ‘ChRISes’ that live out on clouds.”

    [...]

    Both this use case and the medical ones follow an operational pattern of bringing in the data and code, running on the optimum numbers of data, and sharing the input data and the temporary data that are required for the application itself. ChRIS also has mechanisms that can facilitate visualizing the data for clinicians.

    The end goal is not to just make applications run faster on a single machine, but to open source data itself, while still remaining compliant to regulations like the U.S.’s HIPAA and Europe’s GDPR.

  • [PodCTL] PodCTL #46 – KubeVirt and Container Native Virtualization

    Does it feel like sometimes the new Kubernetes updates are only targeted at new, cloud-native applications? What about all those existing applications that aren’t microservices or are running in virtual machines today? Today’s show looks at the intersection of container, virtual machines and Kubernetes. We talk about the KubeVirt project and the work that Red Hat is doing with Container Native Virtualization. It’s a great look at how new Kubernetes capabilities like Customer Resource Definitions (CRDs) are allowing Kubernetes to expand it’s capabilities without making the core project less stable.

  • Eclipse MicroProfile and Red Hat Update: Thorntail and SmallRye

    With the name, we also changed versioning to come back to a more semantic version numbering. Thus the last release version of WildFly Swarm was 2018.5.0 and the first version of Thorntail (same code, different name) was 2.0.0.Final.

    Changing the version numbering makes it easier for us to communicate about new features and have better links to downstream project versions.

    You’ll find more information on the project renaming and versioning changes in this interview that Bob McWhirter gave to InfoQ.

  • Can I catch up with Linux containers?

    Cloud, Linux containers, and container orchestration (in the form of Kubernetes) are the topics I hear being discussed the most today. Most IT organizations are discussing DevOps and microservices. The will to deep dive into that pool of fresh new experiences is leading many organizations to rethink tooling, culture, and processes in-house. Businesses want all the benefits of this digital transformation, but are you really prepared for this new paradigm? Are you really ready for containers?

    In order to standardize environments, isolate processes or increase modularity, to be able to better produce code, services and provide maintenance, the solution that comes in handy is containers. A smaller footprint which is standardized and isolated while consuming the resources of the host was the perfect recipe. Click here to understand what containers are.

  • Transitioning the Red Hat container registry

    Red Hat has seen significant adoption of our container ecosystem since we began shipping Red Hat Enterprise Linux with support for Linux containers more than four years ago. To support our existing users and users to come, we will be transitioning our product portfolio and customers to a new container registry for Red Hat container images available at registry.redhat.io over the next year. We have several reasons to make this change, and we’re also taking a number of steps to make the move away from registry.access.redhat.com as minimally disruptive as possible.

  • Maxta Launches Hyperconverged (Un)Appliance for Red Hat Virtualization Pre-Configured on Intel® Data Center Blocks
  • Introducing Red Hat infrastructure migration solution: An enterprise-grade remedy designed for proprietary virtualization silo ills

    For many organizations, legacy virtualization solutions can stifle innovation and IT advancement, which can limit the path to hybrid cloud infrastructure, where workloads and resources span physical, virtual and cloud-based environments. The cost of maintaining these existing infrastructure investments can tie up a significant portion of IT budgets. Compounding this, Gartner states, “IT organizations with goals for "doing more with less" find it difficult to quantify, estimate and communicate the level of non-discretionary IT spending needed to sustain business transformation.” With the budget remaining, an organization can be forced to put digital transformation, the modernization of IT environments through digital technologies, on hold.

  • FORM 4
  • Flock 2018

    A couple weeks ago I had the pleasure of traveling to Dresden, Germany to attend Flock, the annual gathering of Fedora contributors. This was my third Flock and it was fun and quite productive.

    One of the things I enjoyed about this year's schedule was the built-in coffee breaks. Most conferences pack the schedule completely full with many simultaneous tracks, so that attending the "hallway track" means that you are missing talks. The built-in coffee breaks were such that there were no other scheduled activities, which was great for having sanctioned hallway track time. It was a great idea and I hope it is also incorporated into next year's event.

  • IBus 1.5.19 is released

    IBus 1.5.19 is now released and it’s available in Fedora 29.

  • [ES] Docker Meetup 05 Panamá [Docker+Fedora]
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More in Tux Machines

OSS/Microsoft Openwashing Leftovers

Brave and Firefox Latest

  • Brave Browser Team Up With Tor
     

    TOR [sic] or The Onion Router uses technology that separates your computer from the website you’re viewing by routing the network traffic through 3 seperate servers before it reaches your computer. That being said Brave Core Beta hasn’t been fully tested yet so “users should not rely on it for serious use just yet,” Brave said.

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  • Your RSS is grass: Mozilla euthanizes feed reader, Atom code in Firefox browser, claims it's old and unloved
    When Firefox 64 arrives in December, support for RSS, the once celebrated content syndication scheme, and its sibling, Atom, will be missing. "After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product," said Gijs Kruitbosch, a software engineer who works on Firefox at Mozilla, in a blog post on Thursday. RSS – which stands for Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Really Simple Syndication, as you see fit – is an XML-based format for publishing and subscribing to web content feeds. It dates back to 1999 and for a time was rather popular, but been disappearing from a variety of applications and services since then. Mozilla appears to have gotten the wrecking ball rolling in 2011 when it removed the RSS button from Firefox. The explanation then was the same as it is now: It's just not very popular.
  • Cameron Kaiser: It's baaaaa-aaack: TenFourFox Intel
    It's back! It's undead! It's ugly! It's possibly functional! It's totally unsupported! It's ... TenFourFox for Intel Macs! Years ago as readers of this blog will recall, Claudio Leite built TenFourFox 17.0.2 for Intel, which the update check-in server shows some determined users are still running to this day on 10.5 and even 10.4 despite various problems such as issue 209. However, he didn't have time to maintain it, and a newer version was never built, though a few people since then have made various attempts and submitted some patches. One of these attempts is now far enough along to the point where I'm permitted to announce its existence. Riccardo Mottola has done substantial work on getting TenFourFox to build and run again on old Intel Macs with a focus on 32-bit compatibility, and his patches have been silently lurking in the source code repository for some time. Along with Ken Cunningham's additional work, who now also has a MacPorts portfile so you can build it yourself (PowerPC support in the portfile is coming, though you can still use the official instructions, of course), enough functions in the new Intel build that it can be used for basic tasks.

Security: 'Smart' Locks, Windows in Weapons

Android Leftovers