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Red Hat

Red Hat: Surveillance and New 1-Year High

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Red Hat

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat

Red Hat: Decision Manager 7, Podcasts, Fedora 27, and RPM

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Red Hat
MDV
  • Red Hat Beefs Up Low-Code Offerings for Enterprises

    Red Hat, a provider of enterprise open source solutions, has introduced a decision management platform and low-code development tool intended to simplify the development and deployment of rules-based applications and services. Red Hat Decision Manager 7 is the next generation of the company’s business rules management offering, Red Hat JBoss BRMS, and is designed to enable organizations to quickly build applications that automate business decisions.

    “The notion of low-code development is less about eliminating code or cutting traditional programmers out of the application development process, and more about helping business and IT users to do what they need to do quickly and efficiently, and in a complementary manner,” said Mike Piech, vice president and general manager of middleware for Red Hat. “Ultimately, what low-code tools should offer - and what we have built with Red Hat Decision Manager - is not a platform geared toward one or the other, but rather a rich and tightly integrated feature set designed to provide a better user experience regardless of whether you are a business analyst or hard-core developer.”

  • Stock to Watch – Red Hat Inc (NYSE: RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) – Hot Stock in the Spotlight
  • Champlain Investment Partners LLC Boosts Position in Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Fedora Podcast 002 — Ambassadors, the face of Fedora

    The Fedora Marketing Team is continuing with the Fedora Podcast and we have a new episode out. This ongoing series will feature interviews and talks with people who make the Fedora community awesome. These folks work on new technologies found in Fedora. Or they produce the distribution itself. Some work on putting Fedora in the hands of users.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #28 – Kubernetes Roles & Personas
  • Emojis in vte

    It’s been one of those weeks when gnome-terminal and vte keep stumbling on some really weird edge cases, so it was a happy moment when I saw this on Fedora 27 Workstation.

  • OpenMandriva Switching Back From RPM5 To RPM4

    It was seven years ago that Mandriva 2011 switched to using RPM5 from RPM4, but now for the next OpenMandriva release they are transitioning back to using RPM4 and with that making use of Fedora's DNF.

  • Switching to RPMv4

    Cooker and 3.0 may be broken for upcoming days, as we need to adapt our docker builders and scripts to RPM4 and dnf.

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • How to Configure NFS Server Clustering with Pacemaker on CentOS 7 / RHEL 7
  • ZTE Teams up with Red Hat to Promote Telcos’ Network Transformation

    As a leading provider of communications solutions, ZTE’s VNFs have achieved certification with Red Hat OpenStack Platform, providing telcos with alternatives besides its self-developed NFV solutions. The certification offers confidence that ZTE’s VNFs have been tested and certified for use with Red Hat OpenStack Platform to provide consistent performance and compatibility.

  • KBC Group NV Boosts Stake in Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT)
  • An overview of Project Atomic

    Terms like "cloud-native" and "web scale" are often used and understood as pointless buzzwords. Under the layers of marketing, though, cloud systems do work best with a new and different way of thinking about system administration. Much of the tool set used for cloud operations is free software, and Linux is the platform of choice for almost all cloud applications. While just about any distribution can be made to work, there are several projects working to create a ground-up system specifically for cloud hosts. One of the best known of these is Project Atomic from Red Hat and the Fedora Project.

    The basic change in thinking from conventional to cloud-computing operations is often summed up as that of "pets versus cattle". Previously, we have looked at our individual computers as "pets", in that we think about them as individual entities that need to be protected. If a server went down, you would carefully fix that server, or in a worst case replace it with a new host by copying over a backup. In a cloud environment, we can create and destroy hosts in seconds, so we take advantage of this by treating those hosts as largely disposable "cattle". If a host encounters a problem, we just destroy it and create a new host to take over its function.

    Closely coupled with this paradigm shift is a move to containerization. Container systems like Moby (formerly known as Docker) or rkt allow you to deploy software by packaging it into an image, similar to a very lightweight virtual machine, complete with all dependencies and system configuration required. Containerized, cloud-based deployments are quickly becoming the most common arrangement for web applications and other types of internet-connected software that are amenable to horizontal scaling.

Red Hat News

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Red Hat: The Open Organization and More

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  • The Open Organization

    I really enjoyed the way the power of purpose is put into the book. The other idea was the idea of Meritocracy being introduce to me, I got know merit means having an amazing idea and idea being the sole reason of doing a certain action. Better ideas win, they are questioned and that is how innovation happen in the organization. People debate over it question it trash it. People just don’t settle for something to avoid conflict and that is what the culture that has creeped in the organization where people don’t give way to debates just to avoid conflicts so that everyone remains happy. It was so amazing to read those stories where someone thought out of the box and wanted to bring a new way of doing things and how he needs to convince everyone that this is the right way of doing things, give it a try.

  • Announcing the 2017 Open Source Yearbook: Download now
  • Next DevNation Live: Secure Spring Boot Microservices with Keycloak, March 1st, 12pm EST
  • Let's talk about PCI-DSS

    For those who aren’t familiar with Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS), it is the standard that is intended to protect our credit card data as it flows between systems and is stored in company databases. PCI-DSS requires that all vulnerabilities rated equal to, or higher than, CVSS 4.0 must be addressed by PCI-DSS compliant organizations (notably, those which process and/or store cardholder data). While this was done with the best of intentions, it has had an impact on many organizations' capability to remediate these vulnerabilities in their environment.

    The qualitative severity ratings of vulnerabilities as categorized by Red Hat Product Security do not directly align with the baseline ratings recommended by CVSS. These CVSS scores and ratings are used by PCI-DSS and most scanning tools. As a result, there may be cases where a vulnerability which would be rated as low severity by Red Hat, may exceed the CVSS’ recommended threshold for PCI-DSS.

  • Red Hat names Fuji Xerox exec as new A/NZ channel director

    Former Fuji Xerox Australia channels (partners and alliances) executive general manager, Garry Gray, has been named as Red Hat’s channel director in Australia and New Zealand.

    The appointment comes just over a month after the open source software solutions vendor’s local channel sales and development director, Colin Garro, stepped away from the role he had held since 2012.

  • Red Hat Adds Zing to High-Density Storage

    Red Hat has announced the addition of high-density storage capabilities to its in-memory data management technology. The company has expanded an alliance with Azul Systems to build on their prior collaboration to provide entitlements for Azul Zing with JBoss Data Grid subscriptions. The arrangement will help customers meet speed and volume needs for their big data environments. The design of Azul's Zing runtime for Java supports high-performance on-heap storage, making it well-suited for JBoss Data Grid deployments that feature large in-memory data sets.

  • Today’s Hot Mover – Red Hat Inc (NYSE: RHT)
  • Tech stands to be only positive S&P 500 sector in February

Red Hat News and Press Releases

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Announces New Innovations in Management Portfolio

    Red Hat, Inc., an open source software solutions company, has introduced new innovations in its management portfolio, which include the latest releases of Red Hat CloudForms and Red Hat Satellite. The company says the new innovations are devised to speed up deployments of cloud environments powered by Red Hat and also simplify and automate current infrastructure management.

  • Red Hat and Azul Collaborate for High Density In-Memory Data Storage
  • Red Hat Honors Instructors Who Champion Open Source Education

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today recognized eight higher education instructors for their continuing efforts to incorporate open source philosophies, methods and tools into their academic work.

  • NETSCOUT Achieves Red Hat OpenStack Platform Certification

    NETSCOUT SYSTEMS, INC., (NASDAQ: NTCT), a leading provider of business assurance, a powerful combination of service assurance, cybersecurity, and business intelligence solutions, today announced it has joined Red Hat Connect for Technology Partner Program and has collaborated with Red Hat to achieve Red Hat OpenStack Certification. The certification demonstrates that NETSCOUT’s virtualized product, vSTREAM®, has been tested and certified for use with Red Hat OpenStack Platform to provide consistent performance and compatibility.

Red Hat News Leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.