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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat:

Fedora:

  • F25-20170221 Updated ISOs available!!

    It is with great pleasure to announce that the Community run respin team has yet another Updated ISO round. This round carries the 4.9.10-200 kernel along with over 780 MB of updates (avg, some Desktop Environments more, some less) since the Gold release.

  • F25-20170221 Updated Lives Released

    I am happy to announce new F25-20170221 Updated Lives.

  • Our Bootloader Problem

    GRUB, it is time we broke up. It’s not you, it’s me. Okay, it’s you. The last 15+ years have some great (read: painful) memories. But it is time to call it quits.

    Red Hat Linux (not RHEL) deprecated LILO for version 9 (PDF; hat tip: Spot). This means that Fedora has used GRUB as its bootloader since the very first release: Fedora Core 1.

    GRUB was designed for a world where bootloaders had to locate a Linux kernel on a filesystem. This meant it needed support for all the filesystems anyone might conceivably use. It was also built for a world where dual-booting meant having a bootloader implemented menu to choose between operating systems.

Red Hat Financial News

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Red Hat
  • SSM uses Red Hat technology to modernise IT infrastructure

    RED Hat, Inc, a provider of open source solutions, announced that it has been selected by Suruhanjaya Syarikat Malaysia (SSM) to support the development of a new and advanced gateway for the registration of companies and businesses in Malaysia.

    Mesiniaga Bhd, a systems integrator with 35 years of experience, is the primary implementer for this initiative.

  • The Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Stake Lowered by FIL Ltd
  • Analysts Near-Term outlook: Red Hat (RHT), CMS Energy (CMS)
  • Fedora 27 Aiming To Drop Out Alpha Releases

    In a similar effort to Ubuntu itself not issuing alpha/beta releases the past few years as they focused on the quality of their daily ISOs instead, Fedora developers have been discussing a similar maneuver of beginning to drop alpha releases from their schedule.

    Beginning with Fedora 27 we could see no more alpha releases, if the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee approves of this change. The focus would be on ensuring Fedora Rawhide is always in good shape and save on release engineering time and other resources with putting out alpha builds.

  • Fedora macbook pro testers++

    In the final run-up to the Fedora 25 release, we slipped a week because there was a bug in installs on apple osx (now macos again) hardware. This was (and is) a use case the Workstation working group cares about, as they would love for folks with apple hardware to install Fedora and use it on that hardware. Sadly, we don’t have too many testers with this hardware to help our testing cycles, and many community members with this hardware also are using it day to day and cannot afford to reinstall and test at the drop of a hat.

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • DLT secures $133.4m BPA to provide Red Hat solution to US Department of Navy

    US-based DLT Solutions has entered a blanket purchase agreement (BPA) with the US Department of Navy (DON) to deliver its Red Hat software and related services.

  • The State of Tennessee Treasury Department Buys 19,004 Shares of Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Valuation According To Analysts
  • Fedora Modularity Documentation

    Wiki pages are great for collaboration. But they are not that great in getting people’s attention. They can also become pretty messy and hard to navigate trough when using multiple pages that are related to each other – like documentation – which was what we had there. We needed something better. Something that would make it easy to go trough multiple pages of documentation. Something that would have a simple landing page explaining what we do. And having a simple way to review the changes people make before publishing them would be also great.

    I knew we wanted something better, but I didn’t know what exactly. I also didn’t want to invent yet another way to build docs. So I looked around, and found the Fedora Release Engineering documentation. It’s hosted in Pagure Docs, it’s built with Python Sphinx, and it also used to be a wiki. And I got inspired!

Fedora: The Latest

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Red Hat
  • Anaconda Install Banners get a Makeover!

    A redesign/ update for Anaconda install banners has been an ongoing project for me since the summer and has recently, in the passed month or so, had a fair amount of conversation on its Pagure ticket. I have done multiple series of iterations for these banners, and in the couple of weeks have established a design that represents the Fedora vibe. There are three, sort of, sub-categories for the banners: Common Banners, Server-specific Banners, and Desktop-specific Banners. At this point I have completed drafts of the Common banners (available on all editions) and the Desktop-specific banners (available in addition to Common for Desktop editions).

  • This is why I drink: a discussion of Fedora's legal state

    Tom Callaway seems to be a very nice person who has been overclocked to about 140% normal human speed. In only 20 minutes he gave an interesting and highly-amusing talk that could have filled a 45-minute slot on the legal principles that underpin Fedora, how they got that way, and how they work out in practice.

    In the old days, Callaway said, Red Hat made Red Hat Linux, entirely in-house. What the company didn't make was any money; sales of hats generated more profit than sales of Red Hat box sets, which apparently were sold at a loss. It was felt that this plan wouldn't work out in the long term, so Red Hat changed to making Enterprise Linux. It didn't want to stop doing a hobbyist Linux, however, so Fedora Core was launched. Red Hat also wanted the community to have input into what Fedora was, and how it looked, but the company couldn't just drop the reins and let the community take over, because it was still legally the distributor.

  • Modularity & Generational Core: The future of Fedora?
  • Fedora 25: running Geekbench.

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • DLT captures $133.4M Red Hat Navy deal

    DLT Solutions will provide the Navy with Red Hat software and services under a five-year, $133.4 million blanket purchase agreement.

    The BPA includes an enterprise license agreement for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, add-ons, and management and provisioning tools such as Red Hat Satellite.

  • Bluetooth in Fedora

    So… Bluetooth. It’s everywhere now. Well, everywhere except Fedora. Fedora does, of course support bluetooth. But even the most common workflows are somewhat spotty. We should improve this.

  • PHP version 7.0.16 and 7.1.2
  • North America and Fedora: Year in Review

    The past year has proven to be both challenging and demanding for our Ambassadors. During the past year there have been a lot of new ideas proposed and more events that are being sought out attempting to expand our base. Many of the ventures have been with hack-a-thons in several states. This has been a relatively new venture in those areas. Since our involvement in these types of events, we quickly discovered that Fedora and the associated spins were a new tool for most of these individuals attending and participating. That was a surprising fact within the community that the young and impressionable individuals seemed to be using Windows more than any other operating system available. Since those few we (Fedora) attended, there has been an increase in the open source software utilization across the board at these types of events, a total and undeniable success.

  • 2016 – My Year in Review

    Before looking too far ahead to the future, it’s important to spend time to reflect over the past year’s events, identify successes and failures, and devise ways to improve. Describing my 2016 is a challenge for me to find the right words for. This post continues a habit I started last year with my 2015 Year in Review. One thing I discover nearly every day is that I’m always learning new things from various people and circumstances. Even though 2017 is already getting started, I want to reflect back on some of these experiences and opportunities of the past year.

    [...]

    Towards the end of summer, in the beginning of August, I was accepted as a speaker to the annual Fedora Project contributor conference, Flock. As a speaker, my travel and accommodation were sponsored to the event venue in Kraków, Poland.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
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More in Tux Machines

Development News

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”

Wine and Games

  • [Wine] Packaging changes
    Today we want to announce some important changes regarding the Wine Staging packages provided at repos.wine-staging.com and dl.winehq.org. We completely reworked our build system to make the packages available sooner after a release and also added some new features, like downloading old packages for Debian / Ubuntu. The complete list of changes can be found in the announcement email on the Wine mailing list.
  • Planescape: Torment Enhanced Edition Announced for PC, Mac, Linux, and Mobile
  • Podcast #6 with Ethan Lee, Porter on Fez, Transistor
    Have you ever played Fez on Linux ? Transistor ? Speed Runners ? Shenzen I/O ? Bastion ? or more recently, Owlboy ? Well if you have, you have benefited from the work of Flibitijibibo who is directly responsible for the port of such titles to your platform.