Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat

Red Hat: Education, Automation, RHEL 6.10 and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat, Lord Wandsworth College and University of Surrey collaborate

    Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, has announced its collaboration with Lord Wandsworth College (LWC), an independent school for girls and boys aged 11 to 18, and the University of Surrey, a public research university specialising in science, engineering, medicine and business, on the Open Schools Coding Competition, designed to inspire the next generation of coders and software developers. In so doing, the competition hopes to contribute to building the UK’s digital talent pool.

    The competition is now in its second year, with 10 schools and approximately 100 students in the UK taking part. The competition aims to engage children ahead of making their subject choices for GCSE, so is open to Key Stage 3 students. It challenges teams of students to use any free visual programming environment to create a gaming app that will help a charity of their choice. The competition enables participants to apply the basic principles of open source software development and open collaboration to solve a real world problem in a fun and competitive environment, with the opportunity to win a prize for their team and recognition for their school. In choosing a charitable cause, each student can gain a sense of how they can use digital skills to make their own contribution to addressing societal challenges and how open source technology and methodology can drive positive change in the world.

  • Red Hat Unveils Next-Generation Process Automation Offering
  • Red Hat Drives Mission-Critical Stability with Latest Update to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6
  • Red Hat Data Grid on Three Clouds (the details behind the demo)

    If you saw or heard about the multi-cloud demo at Red Hat Summit 2018, this article details how we ran Red Hat Data Grid in active-active-active mode across three cloud providers. This set up enabled us to show a fail over between cloud providers in real time with no loss of data. In addition to Red Hat Data Grid, we used Vert.x (reactive programming), OpenWhisk (serverless), and Red Hat Gluster Storage (software-defined storage.)

  • RedHat stock falls after Raymond James downgrade

Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora: Anaconda Improvements, Greenboot, Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes and Abhishek

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Anaconda improvements in Fedora 28

    Fedora 28 was released last month, and the major update brought with it a raft of new features for the Fedora Installer (Anaconda). Like Fedora, Anaconda is a dynamic software project with new features and updates every release. Some changes are user visible, while others happen under the hood — making Anaconda more robust and prepared for future improvements.

  • Lorbus: Introducing: greenboot

    Not too long ago, I applied to Google Summer of Code for the student scholarship position together with a Fedora project ideated by Peter Robinson, who is the principal IoT architect at Red Hat, named Fedora IoT: Atomic Host Upgrade Daemon. As you may be guessing by now, I was very fortunate and the proposal was accepted! The coding phase started on the 14th of May and in this blog post I’ll try to give a little insight into my first month working on the project.

  • Pre-release Fedora Scientific Vagrant Boxes

    I am very excited to share that sometime back the Fedora project gave the go ahead on my idea of making Fedora Scientific available as Vagrant boxes starting with Fedora 29. This basically means (I think) that using Fedora Scientific in a virtual machine is even easier.

  • [Week 5] GSoC Status Report for Fedora App: Abhishek

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • An Open Source Load Balancer for OpenShift

    A highly-available deployment of OpenShift needs at least two load balancers: One to load balance the control plane (the master API endpoints) and one for the data plane (the application routers). In most on-premise deployments, we use appliance-based load balancers (such as F5 or Netscaler).

  • Red Hat Beefs Up Platform as a Service Suite

    Red Hat has begun shipping Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service (iPaaS) offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, the vendor says expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, an enterprise Kubernetes platform. Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.

  • Red Hat ‘Fuses’ Low Code Development and Data Integration

    Red Hat, a provider of open source solutions, has announced Red Hat Fuse 7, the next major release of its distributed, cloud-native integration solution, and introduced a new fully hosted low-code integration platform as a service offering, Fuse Online. With Fuse 7, Red Hat is expanding its integration capabilities natively to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform.

    Fuse gives customers a unified solution for creating, extending and deploying containerized integration services across hybrid cloud environments.

  • The GPL cooperation commitment and Red Hat projects

    As of today, all new Red Hat-initiated open source projects that opt to use GPLv2 or LGPLv2.1 will be expected to supplement the license with the cure commitment language of GPLv3. The cure language will live in a file in the project source tree and will function as an additional permission extended to users from the start.

    This is the latest development in an ongoing initiative within the open source community to promote predictability and stability in enforcement of GPL-family licenses. The “automatic termination” provision in GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x is often interpreted as terminating the license upon noncompliance without a grace period or other opportunity to correct the error in compliance. When the Free Software Foundation released GPLv2 in 1991, it held nearly all GPL-licensed copyrights, in part a consequence of the copyright assignment policy then in place for GNU project contributions. Long after the Linux kernel and many other non-GNU projects began to adopt the GPL and LGPL, the FSF was still the only copyright holder regularly engaged in license enforcement. Under those conditions, the automatic termination feature of GPLv2 section 4 may have seemed an appropriate means of encouraging license compliance.

  • Monness Believes Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) Still Has Room to Grow
  • Comparing Red Hat (RHT) & Autoweb (AUTO)
  • As Red Hat (RHT) Share Value Rose, Calamos Advisors Upped Its Position by $300,831; Chilton Capital Management Increases Stake in Equinix (EQIX)
  • Blair William & Co. IL Buys 23,279 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

From outside programming circles, software licensing may not seem important. In open-source, though, licensing is all important.

So, when leading Linux company Red Hat announces that -- from here on out -- all new Red Hat-initiated open-source projects that use the GNU General Public License(GPLv2) or GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL)v2.1 licenses will be expected to supplement the license with GPL version 3 (GPLv3)'s cure commitment language, it's a big deal.

Read more

Fedora 29 To Fully Embrace The FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification

Filed under
Red Hat

Adding to the growing list of features for Fedora 29 is a plan to fully support the FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification and making use of their defined fragment files to populate boot-loader boot menu entries, including the kernel entries.

The FreeDesktop.org Boot Loader Specification is an existing spec for trying to allow a standardized boot configuration format between operating systems / Linux distributions that are based upon drop-in files. The goal has been to be "robust, simple, works without rewriting configuration files and is free of namespace clashes." The specification can be found on FreeDesktop.org and in its current form for the past two years.

Read more

Fedora: Fedora 29, Linux 4.17 (Soon), Fedora vs Ubuntu

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Binutils 2.31 Slated For Fedora 29

    To little surprise given that Fedora Linux always strives to ship with a bleeding-edge GNU toolchain, for the Fedora 29 release this fall they are planning to make use of the yet-to-be-released Binutils 2.31.

  • Linux 4.17 Stable Has Been Settling Well, Coming Soon To Fedora

    Since the release of Linux 4.17 almost two weeks ago, I haven't heard of any horror stories, Linux 4.17 continues running excellent on all of my test systems, the 4.17.1 point release was quite small, and more distributions are gearing up to ship this latest kernel release.

  • [Older] Fedora vs Ubuntu

Server: Containers and 'Enterprise' GNU/Linux

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Container and Kubernetes Security: It's Complicated

    Container technology is being increasingly used by organizations as a way to deploy applications and micro-services. The promise of containers is improved agility and portability, while potentially also reducing the attack surface. Though container technology can be helpful for security, it can also have its own set of risks.

    In a panel session at the recent Kubecon + CloudNativeCon EU event titled "Modern App Security Requires Containers" -- moderated by eSecurity Planet -- security experts from Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) project and Google debated what's wrong and what's right with container security.

  • Docker Defines Itself as the Open Choice for Containers at DockerCon 18

    Docker CEO Steve Singh kicked off his company's DockerCon 18 conference here today, offering the assembled crowd of container enthusiasts a clear vision of where Docker is going.

    For Docker Inc, the company behind the eponymous container system, a lot is at stake. This is the first DockerCon where the founder of the company, Solomon Hykes is not present. Hykes left Docker in March, as the company direction has increasingly focused on enterprise adoption and commercial market growth.

  • How to select the right enterprise Linux

    The decision to use any modern edition of that operating system, generally spoken as RHEL with a silent H, is usually based on a need for component stability, paid technical support, and long-term version support, said Red Hat's Ron Pacheco, director of global product management.

  • CentOS 7.4 & kernel 4.x - Worth the risk?

    The reasons why we have gathered here are many. A few weeks ago, my CentOS distro went dead. With the new kernel containing Spectre patches, it refused to load the Realtek Wireless drivers into memory. Moreover, patches also prevent manual compilation. This makes the distro useless, as it has no network connection. Then, in my CentOS 7.4 upgrade article - which was flawless, including the network piece, go figure - I wondered about the use of new, modern 4.x kernels in CentOS. Sounds like we have a real incentive here.

    In this tutorial, I will attempt to install and use the latest mainline kernel (4.16 when I typed this). The benefits should be many. I've seen improved performance, responsiveness and battery life in newer kernels compared to the 3.x branch. The Realtek Wireless woes of the disconnect kind (like a Spielberg movie) were also fixed in kernel 4.8.7 onwards, so that's another thing. Lastly, this would make CentOS a lean, mean and modern beast. Bravely onwards!

    [...]

    Now, I can breathe with relief, as I've delivered on my promise, and I gave you a full solution to the CentOS 7.4 Realtek issues post upgrade. I do not like to end articles on a cliffhanger, and definitely not carry the solution over to a follow-up article, but in this rare case, it was necessary. The mainline kernel upgrade is a topic of its own.

    The kernel installation worked fine, and thereafter, we seem to have gained on many fronts. The network issues are fully resolved, we can compile again, the performance seems improved despite worse figures in the system monitor, battery life and stability are not impaired in any way, and the CentOS box has fresh new life, wrapped in modern features and latest software. And none of this was meant to be in the first place, because CentOS is a server distro. Well, I hope you are happy. The one outstanding mission - Plasma 5. Once we have that, we can proudly claim to have created the ultimate Linux distro hybrid monster. Take care.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu 18.04 Reviewed, Akademy, Cutelyst and GUADEC

  • Kubuntu 18.04 Reviewed in Linux ( Pro ) Magazine
    Kubuntu Linux has been my preferred Linux distribution for more than 10 years. My attraction to the KDE desktop and associated application set, has drawn from Kubuntu user, to a tester, teacher, developer, community manager and councilor. I feel really privileged to be part of, what can only be described as, a remarkable example of the free software, and community development of an exceptional product. This latest release 18.04, effectively the April 2018 release, is a major milestone. It is the first LTS Long Term Support release of Kubuntu running the “Plasma 5” desktop. The improvements are so considerable, in both performance and modern user interface ( UI ) design, that I was really excited about wanting to tell the world about it.
  • Going to Akademy
    Happy to participate in a tradition I’ve admired from afar but never been able to do myself… until this year. My tickets are bought, my passport is issued, and I’m going to Akademy! Hope to see you all there!
  • System76's New Manufacturing Facility, Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Google Cloud Platform Marketplace, Stranded Deep Now Available for Linux and Cutelyst New Release
    Cutelyst, a C++ web framework based on Qt, has a new release. The update includes several bug fixes and some build issues with buildroot. See Dantti's Blog for all the details. Cutelyst is available on GitHub.
  • GUADEC 2018 Videos: Help Wanted
    At this year’s GUADEC in Almería we had a team of volunteers recording the talks in the second room. This was organized very last minute as initially the University were going to do this, but thanks to various efforts (thanks in particular to Adrien Plazas and Bin Li) we managed to record nearly all the talks. There were some issues with sound on both the Friday and Saturday, which Britt Yazel has done his best to overcome using science, and we are now ready to edit and upload the 19 talks that took place in the 2nd room. To bring you the videos from last year we had a team of 5 volunteers from the local team who spent our whole weekend in the Codethink offices. (Although none of us had much prior video editing experience so the morning of the first day was largely spent trying out different video editors to see which had the features we needed and could run without crashing too often… and the afternoon was mostly figuring out how transitions worked in Kdenlive).
  • GUADEC 2018
    This year I attended my second GUADEC in beautiful Almería, Spain. As with the last one I had the opportunity to meet many new people from the extended GNOME community which is always great and I can’t recommend it enough for anybody involved in the project. [...] Flatpak continues to have a lot of healthy discussions at these events. @matthiasclasen made a post summarizing the BoF so check that out for the discussions of the soon landing 1.0 release. So lets start with the Freedesktop 18.07 (date based versioning now!) runtime which is in a much better place than 1.6 and will be solving lots of problems such as multi-arch support and just long term maintainability. I was really pleased to see all of the investment in BuildStream and the runtime from CodeThink which is really needed in the long term.

Red Hat and Fedora

Android: Video Editors, Antitrust/Forks, and Fuchsia OS

OSS Leftovers

  • Mitre to Use Open Source Tool for Cyber Evaluations on 8 Companies
    Mitre will deploy an open source tool to assess the cybersecurity capabilities of eight companies and subsequently release findings in October as part of an initiative by the nonprofit research organization, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday. The Washington Business Journal reported Tuesday that Mitre will utilize its Adversarial Tactics, Techniques and Common Knowledge platform to help conduct evaluations on the cyber offerings of Carbon Black (Nasdaq: CBLK), CounterTack, CrowdStrike, Cylance, Endgame, Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT), RSA and SentinelOne.
  • News:-Apache’s Project Kafka has released stable latest version 1.1.1
    Apache Kafka is a distributed streaming platform to publish, store, subscribe, and process the records. Kafka is broadly used for real-time streaming of the data between systems or applications. There are various applications in which Kafka is used like samza and confluent for Real-time Financial Alerts. Big brand names like The NewYork Times, Pinterest, Zalando, Rabobank, LINE, trivago are few of them who are using Kafka.
  • Creating Open-Source Projects Companies Want to Sponsor
  • IBM reflects on open source some 20 years into it
    Open source might be a relatively new trend in telecom, but it’s been around at least 20 years, and that’s something OSCON 2018 organizers want to make sure attendees here are aware. The open source convention known as OSCON hosts developers, IT managers, system administrators and just plain geeks who want to learn the latest in blockchain, Kubernetes or other technical arenas and hear inspiring stories about open source. The convention is back in Portland this week after having been held in Austin, Texas, the past two years. In telecom, operators want their vendors to deliver based on open source platforms. Various initiatives are under way, but not every vendor is rushing to the party. Through the Open Networking Foundation (ONF), for example, operators are developing reference designs so that everyone in the supply chain knows what solutions operators plan to procure and deploy.
  • Perspecta Participates in Open Source Summit as Conference Sponsor; Mac Curtis Comments
    Perspecta (NYSE: PRSP) served as a sponsor of the 7th Annual Open Source Summit organized by the Open Source Electronic Health Record Alliance to discuss the use of open source software in industry and government, ExecutiveBiz reported July 13.
  • Get rich with Firefox or *(int *)NULL = 0 trying: Automated bug-bounty hunter build touted
    Do you love Firefox, Linux, and the internet? Are you interested in earning money from the comfort of your own home? Are you OK with a special flavor of Firefox quietly gobbling up memory in a hunt for exploitable security bugs? If so, Mozilla has a deal for you. The open internet organization (and search licensing revenue addict) would like you to go about your usual browsing business with a special Firefox build designed to automatically report potential security flaws in the software back to the mothership. If you do so, and the reported error turns out to be a legit exploitable vulnerability that Firefox engineers can fix, you'll be rewarded as if you'd submitted the errant code to Mozilla's bug bounty program. That's right, kids. Your aimless online procrastination could be your ticket to riches through the ASan Nightly Project.
  • Why an ops career
    It’s been a great “family reunion” of FOSS colleagues and peers in the OSCON hallway track this week. I had a conversation recently in which I was asked “Why did you choose ops as a career path?”, and this caused me to notice that I’ve never blogged about this rationale before. I work in roles revolving around software and engineering because they fall into a cultural sweet spot offering smart and interesting colleagues, opportunities for great work-life balance, and exemplary compensation. I also happen to have taken the opportunity to spend over a decade building my skills and reputation in this industry, which helps me keep the desirable roles and avoid the undesirable ones. Yet, many people in my field prefer software development over operations work.
  • Free and open source software for public health information systems in India
  • David's Progress on The Free Software Directory, internship weeks 2-3
    I'm working on creating a list of free software extensions for Mozilla-based browsers on the Free Software Directory based on data from addons.mozilla.org. This is needed because the official extensions repository includes many proprietary extensions. I found out that it's not possible to use the addons.mozilla.org API to list add-on collections, so I submitted a bug report for this. To my surprise they declined my suggestion, so I had to add a function to my program to parse it manually. Then I went on and wrote a detailed README file to describe the philosophy for the project to make it easy for anyone to contribute. I merged my source code to the Savannah GNU package called Free Software Directory, which also has scripts for importing data from Debian. I started a collection of IceCat add-ons and recommended IceCat (and Abrowser) to use it in Tools -> Add-ons (about:addons) -> Get Add-ons.
  • PHP version 5.6.37, 7.0.31, 7.1.20 and 7.2.8
  • An Introduction to Using Git
    If you’re a developer, then you know your way around development tools. You’ve spent years studying one or more programming languages and have perfected your skills. You can develop with GUI tools or from the command line. On your own, nothing can stop you. You code as if your mind and your fingers are one to create elegant, perfectly commented, source for an app you know will take the world by storm.
  • Open Source and Standard-Essential Patents: More Alike Than Not
    The unspoken question that this paper raises in my mind is whether it may be incorrect to speak of Open Source and standardization as separate activities at all.  Instead, Open Source might correctly be viewed as a species of standardization activity, with particular license conditions and membership conditions. The success of Open Source activities—and other standards that implement royalty-free commitments, such as Bluetooth—shows that there’s a place in the continuum of standards policy for royalty-free licensing when participants wish that to be the case.