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Red Hat

Red Hat's Growth and New Fedora Packages

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat continues steady march toward $5 billion revenue goal

    The last time I spoke to Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst, in June 2016, he had set a pretty audacious goal for his company to achieve $5 billion in revenue. At the time, that seemed a bit far-fetched. After all, his company had just become the first open-source company to surpass $2 billion in revenue. Getting to five represented a significant challenge because, as he pointed out, the bigger you get, the harder it becomes to keep the growth trajectory going.

    But the company has continued to thrive and is on track to pass $3 billion in revenue some time in the next couple of quarters. Red Hat is best known for creating a version of Linux designed specifically for the enterprise, but it has begun adapting to the changing world out there with cloud and containers — and as its RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) customers start to change the way they work (ever so slowly), they are continuing to use Red Hat for these new technologies. As Whitehurst told me, that’s not a coincidence.

  • New packages in Fedora: rtags, renderdoc

Red Hat and Fedora: Alibaba and Fedora 27 Plans

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Red Hat
  • Alibaba Cloud, Red Hat look to boost flexibility with open source

    Alibaba Cloud customers will soon be able to harness the power and flexibility of Red Hat’s open source solutions following a tie-up between the two companies.

    The tie-up will see Alibaba Cloud join the Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider program, joining a host of other big name tech companies who offer Red Hat-tested and validated solutions.

  • Alibaba Cloud to offer, host Red Hat software

    Chinese internet giant has joined Red Hat's cloud partner ecosystem and will offer the latter's open source products to Alibaba Cloud customers as well as host Red Hat customers on its cloud platform.

  • Can These Stocks Continue To Spark? – Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Adobe Systems Incorporated (ADBE)
  • AAC support will be available in Fedora Workstation 27!

    So I am really happy to announce another major codec addition to Fedora Workstation 27 namely the addition of the codec called AAC. As you might have seen from Tom Callaways announcement this has just been cleared for inclusion in Fedora.

    For those not well versed in the arcane lore of audio codecs AAC is the codec used for things like iTunes and is found in a lot of general media files online. AAC stands for Advanced Audio Coding and was created by the MPEG working group as the successor to mp3. Especially due to Apple embracing the format there is a lot of files out there using it and thus we wanted to support it in Fedora too.

  • Fedora Linux Can Finally Offer AAC Audio Codec Support

    Fedora is now able to bundle and offer a specific AAC audio codec implementation as a package for its Linux distribution.

    With Fedora always striving for free software and ensuring its legal state is in order due to Red Hat's control, it was only earlier this year Fedora was legally allowed to begin offering full MP3 support for both decode/encode along with AC3 support while last year it received H.264 support. The latest multimedia expansion for Fedora is now being able to distribute an AAC codec.

  • Fedora 27 bekommt Support für AAC [Ed: in German]
  • Taking Stock, Making Plans.

    When I got started contributing to open source communities it was with the Fedora Project and specifically the Docs team. I have not been anywhere near as active with Fedora lately and I miss it. I still consider myself an active Ambassador with each class I teach but I have not really contributed through content or formal activities lately. I am actually looking for a new challenge though, rather than returning to an old stomping ground, and probably with a smaller project. I dabbled in an Apache Hadoop ecosystem project for a bit and I still follow that mailing list but I never really got into that community. Melding open source and security is ideal, though I have really enjoyed the past year where I jumped into automation with Ansible and containers with OpenShift. The search continues.

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Updates Container Storage Platform as Market Strives for Maturity

    Red Hat’s container push continues with an announced update to its storage component. This follows the recent update to the Red Hat OpenShift Container platform.

  • 2017 Red Hat Government Symposium to Highlight the Role of Open Source in Meeting the Challenges of Government IT
  • A few fall conferences

    I was on the planning committee for Linux Plumbers so I ended up doing a bunch of behinds the scenes work in addition to the hallway track and going to the occasional session. Jon Corbet gave a talk about the kernel's limits to growth. He gave a version of this talk at Linaro Connect and I gave some thoughts about this previously. Most of my opinions there still stand. Grant Likely held a BoF about the upcoming ARM EBBR. If you've been following the arm64 server space, you may have heard of SBBR which is a boot specification for arm64 servers. The EBBR is something similar for embedded devices. As a Fedora maintainer, I'm happy to see this moving forward to make booting arm64 SBCs easier. There was a discussion about contiguous memory allocation for DMA. Some hardware vendors have discovered they get better performance if they use a contiguous block of memory despite possibly having an IOMMU. The proposal was to use the MAP_CONTIG with mmap to get appropriate memory. There wasn't a conclusion and discussion is ongoing on the mailing list.

  • New Adventures: Ansible Edition

    I am honored, excited, nervous, humbled, and over all elated to announce that starting December 1, 2017 I will be a member of the Ansible Core Development Team at Red Hat where I will work primarily on Upstream Ansible (what most people would likely know as just 'Ansible', 'Ansible Core', or 'The Ansible Project' depending on who you talk to).

  • DevConf.CZ 2018 CfP is OPEN

Red Hat News

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat

Latest Open Access LWN: Fedora, Linux Kernel, and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Red Hat
  • Fedora's foundations meet proprietary drivers

    The Fedora project's four "foundations" are named "Freedom", "Friends", "Features", and "First". Among other things, they commit the project to being firmly within the free-software camp ("we believe that advancing software and content freedom is a central goal for the Fedora Project, and that we should accomplish that goal through the use of the software and content we promote") and to providing leading-edge software, including current kernels. Given that the kernel project, too, is focused on free software, it is interesting to see a call within the Fedora community to hold back on kernel updates in order to be able to support a proprietary driver.

    On September 5, Fedora kernel maintainer Laura Abbott announced that the just-released 4.13 kernel would be built for the (in-development) Fedora 27 release, and that it would eventually find its way into the Fedora 25 and 26 releases as well. That is all in line with how Fedora generally operates; new kernels are pushed out to all supported releases in relatively short order. Running current kernels by default is clearly a feature that many Fedora users find useful.

    More recently, though, James Hogarth noted that the NVIDIA proprietary driver did not work with the 4.13 kernel. This kind of breakage is not all that unusual. While the user-space ABI must be preserved, the kernel project defends its right to change internal interfaces at any time. Any problems that out-of-tree code experiences as a result of such changes is deemed to be part of the cost of staying out of the mainline. There is little sympathy for those who have to deal with such issues, and none at all if the out-of-tree code in question is proprietary. Community-oriented projects like Fedora usually take a similar attitude, refusing to slow down for the sake of proprietary code.

  • Notes from the LPC tracing microconference

    The "tracing and BPF" microconference was held on the final day of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference; it covered a number of topics relevant to heavy users of kernel and user-space tracing. Read on for a summary of a number of those discussions on topics like BPF introspection, stack traces, kprobes, uprobes, and the Common Trace Format.

    Unfortunately, your editor had to leave the session before it reached its end, so this article does not reflect all of the topics discussed there. For those who are interested, this Etherpad instance contains notes taken by participants at the session.

  • An update on live kernel patching

    In the refereed track at the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), Jiri Kosina gave an update on the status and plans for the live kernel patching feature. It is a feature that has a long history—pre-dating Linux itself—and has had a multi-year path into the kernel. Kosina reviewed that history, while also looking at some of the limitations and missing features for live patching.

    The first question that gets asked about patching a running kernel is "why?", he said. That question gets asked in the comments on LWN articles and elsewhere. The main driver of the feature is the high cost of downtime in data centers. That leads data center operators to plan outages many months in advance to reduce the cost; but in the case of a zero-day vulnerability, that time is not available. Live kernel patching is targeted at making small security fixes as a stopgap measure until the kernel can be updated during a less-hurried, planned outage. It is not meant for replacing the kernel bit by bit over time, but as an emergency measure when the kernel is vulnerable.

  • Safety-critical realtime with Linux

    Doing realtime processing with a general-purpose operating-system like Linux can be a challenge by itself, but safety-critical realtime processing ups the ante considerably. During a session at Open Source Summit North America, Wolfgang Mauerer discussed the difficulties involved in this kind of work and what Linux has to offer.

    Realtime processing, as many have said, is not synonymous with "real fast". It is, instead, focused on deterministic response time and repeatable results. Getting there involves quantifying the worst-case scenario and being prepared to handle it — a 99% success rate is not good enough. The emphasis on worst-case performance is at the core of the difference with performance-oriented processing, which uses caches, lookahead algorithms, pipelines, and more to optimize the average case.

  • A memory allocation API for graphics devices

    At last year's X.Org Developers Conference (XDC), James Jones began the process of coming up with an API for allocating memory so that it is accessible to multiple different graphics devices in a system (e.g. GPUs, hardware compositors, video decoders, display hardware, cameras, etc.). At XDC 2017 in Mountain View, CA, he was back to update attendees on the progress that has been made. He has a prototype in progress, but there is plenty more to do, including working out some of the problems he has encountered along the way.

    Jones has been at NVIDIA for 13 years and has been working on this problem in various forms for most of that time, he said. Allocating buffers and passing them around between multiple drivers is a complicated problem. The allocator will sit in the same place as the Generic Buffer Management (GBM) component is today; it will be used both by applications and by various user-space driver components. The allocator will support both vendor-agnostic (e.g. Android ION) and vendor-specific back-ends, as well as combinations of the two.

Red Hat and Fedora: Container-Native Storage, Omnetric, systemd 235 and More

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Dynamic Users with systemd

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Software

Today we released systemd 235. Among other improvements this greatly extends the dynamic user logic of systemd. Dynamic users are a powerful but little known concept, supported in its basic form since systemd 232. With this blog story I hope to make it a bit better known.

The UNIX user concept is the most basic and well-understood security concept in POSIX operating systems. It is UNIX/POSIX' primary security concept, the one everybody can agree on, and most security concepts that came after it (such as process capabilities, SELinux and other MACs, user name-spaces, …) in some form or another build on it, extend it or at least interface with it. If you build a Linux kernel with all security features turned off, the user concept is pretty much the one you'll still retain.

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Servers and Red Hat: Cloud Management Suite, Paravirtualization, Gluster

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Red Hat
Server
  • Cloud Management Suite Announces Support for Linux

    "Although Windows is predominantly used at the desktop, many organizations run Linux on their servers," said Diane Roger, Chief Product Officer for Cloud Management Suite.

  • Which OSes include paravirtualization support?

    Certain versions of the Linux kernel offer more complete and uniform support for paravirtualization than others due to the open source nature of Linux.

  • Red Hat Stretches Gluster Clustered Storage Under Containers

    Red Hat has been aggressive in building out its capabilities around containers. The company last month unveiled its OpenShift Container Platform 3.6, its enterprise-grade Kubernetes container platform for cloud native applications that added enhanced security features and greater consistency across hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

    A couple of weeks later, Red Hat and Microsoft expanded their alliance to make it easier for organizations to adopt containers. Red Hat last year debuted OpenShift 3.0, which was based on the open source Kubernetes orchestration system and Docker containers, and the company has since continued to roll out enhancements to the platform.

  • Why Investors remained confident on Bank of America Corporation (BAC), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?
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Unity 7 Hoping To Become An Official Flavor For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

While Canonical abandoned their work on the Unity desktop environment in favor of the Unity-inspired customized GNOME Shell that debuted in Ubuntu 17.10, some within the community have remained interested in maintaining Unity 7 and even getting it into an official spin/flavor of Ubuntu. Posted today to the community.ubuntu.com was a Unity maintenance roadmap, reiterating the hope by some in the Ubuntu community for Ubuntu Unity to become an official LTS distribution of Ubuntu. They are hoping to make it an official flavor alongside Kubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Xubuntu, and others. Read more Original/direct: Unity Maintenance Roadmap

Programming/Development: Django and Google India

  • An introduction to the Django ORM
    One of the most powerful features of Django is its Object-Relational Mapper (ORM), which enables you to interact with your database, like you would with SQL. In fact, Django's ORM is just a pythonical way to create SQL to query and manipulate your database and get results in a pythonic fashion. Well, I say just a way, but it's actually really clever engineering that takes advantage of some of the more complex parts of Python to make developers' lives easier.
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  • Google to prepare 1.3 lakh Indians for emerging technologies

    "The new scholarship programme is in tandem with Google's aim to train two million developers in India. The country is the second largest developer ecosystem in the world and is bound to overtake the US by 2021," William Florance, Developer Products Group and Skilling Lead for India, Google, told reporters here.

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