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Red Hat

Fedora: DNF, Fedora Program Management, PHP and Fedora Magazine

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Red Hat
  • PostgreSQL and upgrades

    As mentioned previously, I run a personal Fediverse instance with Pleroma, which uses Postgres. On Fedora, of course. So, a week ago, I went to do the usual "dnf distro-sync --releasever=30". And then, Postgres fails to start, because the database uses the previous format, 10, and the packages in F30 require format 11. Apparently, I was supposed to dump the database with pg_dumpall, upgrade, then restore. But now that I have binaries that refuse to read the old format, dumping is impossible. Wow.

    A little web searching found an upgrader that works across formats (dnf install postgresql-upgrade; postgresql-setup --upgrade). But that one also copies the database, like a dump-restore procedure would. What if the database is too large for this? Am I the only one who finds these practices unacceptable?

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-23

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. Elections voting is underway!

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • PHPUnit 8.2

    RPM of PHPUnit version 8.2 are available in remi repository for Fedora ≥ 27 and for Enterprise Linux (CentOS, RHEL...).

  • Fedora Magazine: Contribute to Fedora Magazine

Council policy proposal: modify election eligibility

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Red Hat

Inspired by the request that we provide written guidance on time commitment expectations and some conversations from our meeting in December, I have submitted a pull request to implement a policy that anyone running for an elected Fedora Council seat not run for other elected boards at the same time:

The reasoning is that we have an unspoken (for now) expectation that being on the Council, particularly as an elected representative, will not be a trivial commitment. This is an easier check than trying to determine post-election which body a candidate would rather serve on (and thus having to deal with alternates, etc).

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Today: IBM is laying off more than 1,000 employees

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7 Beta now available

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Red Hat

We are pleased to announce that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.7 Beta is now available, the latest update to the stable and more secure Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 platform. RHEL 7.7 marks the final release in the Full Support Phase (formerly known as "Production Phase 1") of the RHEL 7 lifecycle as described in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Lifecycle.

This 10-year lifecycle is a key feature of the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform. As minor releases progress within a major release lifecycle, focus is placed on maintaining infrastructure stability for production environments and enhancing the reliability of the operating system. With RHEL 7 entering the next phase of its lifecycle, future releases will emphasize production stability, rather than introducing net-new features.

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Make Fedora 30 fun and productive after installation

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Red Hat

The end of article is upon us, and hopefully, you now have a more productive, more fun Fedora baseline. The operating system and its Gnome desktop environment require changes if you're after the proven classic desktop formula. Specifically, you need tweaks, extensions, a dock, maybe some fonts changes as the first step. Then, you can add third-party repos and enjoy additional, often proprietary software.

Well, this ought to get you started. There's a lot more you can do, but the idea is to keep things simple and sensible, and avoid massive changes, so you can always go back to defaults if you need to, because if something goes wrong, you know where the issue might be and you can revert to the sane state. All in all, Fedora can be all right, but it needs some work. Well, there you have it. Take care.

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Tweaking the look of Fedora Workstation with themes

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Red Hat

Changing the theme of a desktop environment is a common way to customize your daily experience with Fedora Workstation. This article discusses the 4 different types of visual themes you can change and how to change to a new theme. Additionally, this article will cover how to install new themes from both the Fedora repositories and 3rd party theme sources.

When changing the theme of Fedora Workstation, there are 4 different themes that can be changed independently of each other. This allows a user to mix and match the theme types to customize their desktop in a multitude of combinations. The 4 theme types are the Application (GTK) theme, the shell theme, the icon theme, and the cursor theme.

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Red Hat OpenShift 4 is Now Available

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Red Hat
Server

As of today, Red Hat OpenShift 4 is generally available to Red Hat customers. This rearchitecting in how we install, upgrade and manage the platform also brings with it the power of Kubernetes Operators, Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS, and the Istio-based OpenShift Service Mesh. As transformational as our open hybrid cloud platform can be for managing software at scale, the more impressive transformation may lay ahead for your development and IT teams, as they can now offer more on-demand services in a more secure fashion.

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Also: Kubernetes is a dump truck: Here's why

OSS: Federation, SUSE, Red Hat/Fedora and OSI Sessions

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Red Hat
OSS
SUSE
  • Federated conference videos

    So, foss-north 2019 happened. 260 visitors. 33 speakers. Four days of madness.

    During my opening of the second day I mentioned some social media statistics. Only 7 of our speakers had mastodon accounts, but 30 had twitter accounts.

  • Chameleon and the dragons

    Arriving to the conference venue on a bike was quite pleasant (thanks to bicycle paths almost everywhere in city and amount of parks). One thing which I forgot is the bike lock, but I met Richard Brown and he offered to lock our bikes together.

    First thing which brought my attention was some QR-code on the registration desk which says something like “This is not the first one, search better,” so I had to walk around and try to find correct one. There were 10 of them in different places of Biergarten, each is asking you some question about openSUSE (logos, abbreviations, versions and so on). Once you find all of them and answer correctly, you can pick up prize on registration desk. I really enjoyed this so I proposed this idea for our events.

    I have missed first half of the talks with fixing problem with dynamic BuildRequires and second half by talking with Michael Schröder about libsolv-related things. We’ve discussed what modularity would mean for libsolv, some known corner-cases and I promised to write document which describes how it is supposed to be handled (some kind of test cases).

    Then there was some kind of meetup of OBS (Open Build Service) community (both developers and users) where OBS-related things were discussed. I wish we could have something like “RPM buildsystems meetup” where people could discuss problems in different buildsystems (Koji, OBS) and share solutions.

  • Announcing Thorntail 2.4 general availability

    At this year’s Red Hat Summit, Red Hat announced Thorntail 2.4 general availability for Red Hat customers through a subscription to Red Hat Application Runtimes. Red Hat Application Runtimes provides application developers with a variety of application runtimes running on the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.

  • Container-related content you might have missed at Red Hat Summit

    If you weren’t lucky enough to attend the recent Red Hat Summit or you went but couldn’t make it to all the container-related sessions, worry not. We teamed up with Scott McCarty, Principal Technology Product Manager–Containers at Red Hat, to bring you an overview of what you missed.

  • Aging in the open: How this community changed us

    A passionate and dedicated community offers few of these comforts. Participating in something like the open organization community at Opensource.com—which turns four years old this week—means acquiescing to dynamism, to constant change. Every day brings novelty. Every correspondence is packed with possibility. Every interaction reveals undisclosed pathways.

    To a certain type of person (me again), it can be downright terrifying.

    But that unrelenting and genuine surprise is the very source of a community's richness, its sheer abundance. If a community is the nucleus of all those reactions that catalyze innovations and breakthroughs, then unpredictability and serendipity are its fuel. I've learned to appreciate it—more accurately, perhaps, to stand in awe of it. Four years ago, when the Opensource.com team heeded Jim Whitehurst's call to build a space for others to "share your thoughts and opinions… on how you think we can all lead and work better in the future" (see the final page of The Open Organization), we had little more than a mandate, a platform, and a vision. We'd be an open organization committed to studying, learning from, and propagating open organizations. The rest was a surprise—or rather, a series of surprises:

  • May 2019 License-Discuss Summary

    The corresponding License-Review summary is online at https://opensource.org/LicenseReview052019 and covers extensive debate on the Cryptographic Autonomy License, as well as discussion on a BSD license variant.

  • May 2019 License-Review Summary

    In May, the License-Review mailing list saw extensive debate on the Cryptographic Autonomy License. The list also discussed a BSD variant used by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Master-Console license.

    The corresponding License-Discuss summary is online at https://opensource.org/LicenseDiscuss052019 and covers an announcement regarding the role of the License-Review list, discussion on the comprehensiveness of the approved license list, and other topics.

Create a CentOS homelab in an hour

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OS
Red Hat
HowTos

When working on new Linux skills (or, as I was, studying for a Linux certification), it is helpful to have a few virtual machines (VMs) available on your laptop so you can do some learning on the go.

But what happens if you are working somewhere without a good internet connection and you want to work on a web server? What about using other software that you don't already have installed? If you were depending on downloading it from the distribution's repositories, you may be out of luck. With a bit of preparation, you can set up a homelab that will allow you to install anything you need wherever you are, with or without a network connection.

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Fedora Wants Art/Photography

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Red Hat
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More in Tux Machines

Operating Systems: Debian, Clear Linux, OpenSUSE and Vista 10

  • John Goerzen: Tips for Upgrading to, And Securing, Debian Buster

    Wow.  Once again, a Debian release impresses me — a guy that’s been using Debian for more than 20 years.  For the first time I can ever recall, buster not only supported suspend-to-disk out of the box on my laptop, but it did so on an encrypted volume atop LVM.  Very impressive! For those upgrading from previous releases, I have a few tips to enhance the experience with buster.

  • Clear Linux Could Soon Be Faster Within Containers On AVX2 Systems

    While Clear Linux as part of its standard bare metal installations has long defaulted to having an AVX2-optimized GNU C Library installed by default, it turns out that it wasn't part of the default os-core bundle as used by containers. That though is changing and should yield even better out-of-the-box performance when running Clear Linux within containers. Intel's William Douglas sent out the proposal for adding the AVX2 version of the Glibc libraries into the os-core bundle in order to get picked up by containers and other bare/lightweight Clear configurations.

  • OpenSUSE Enables LTO By Default For Tumbleweed - Smaller & Faster Binaries

    The past few months openSUSE developers have been working on enabling LTO by default for its packages while now finally with the newest release of the rolling-release openSUSE Tumbleweed this goal has been accomplished.  As of today, the latest openSUSE Tumbleweed release is using Link-Time Optimizations (LTO) by default. For end-users this should mean faster -- and smaller -- binaries thanks to the additional optimizations performed at link-time. Link-time optimizations allow for different optimizations to be performed at link-time for the different bits comprising a single module/binary for the entire program. Sadly not many Linux distributions are yet LTO'ing their entire package set besides the aggressive ones like Clear Linux. 

  • Investigating why my 7-year old Windows 10 laptop became unbearably slow

    The laptop had also begun to run into blue screens of death (BSoD) whenever I used the built-in camera and when I opened Spotify or Netflix in a web browser. The slowdown and crashes were actually related, but I didn’t realize this at first. The camera-induced BSoD error message blamed the camera vendor’s driver without any further details. This sounds believable enough for a 7-year old laptop so I didn’t think any more of it.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, FLOSS Weekly, Test and Code

  • LHS Episode #292: Digital Operation Deep Dive

    Welcome to Episode 292 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts are joined by Rob, KA2PBT, in a deep disucussion of digital mode operation on the amateur radio bands including what modes are available, the technology behind the creation and operation of those modes and even dive into current controversy behind FCC rules regarding encryption, PACTOR-4 and much more. Thank you for tuning in and we hope you have a wonderful week.

  • FLOSS Weekly 538: Leo Laporte

    Randal Schwartz and Jonathan Bennett talk to Leo Laporte about FLOSS's history and the TWiT Network.

  • Test and Code: 81: TDD with flit

    In the last episode, we talked about going from script to supported package. I worked on a project called subark and did the packaging with flit. Today's episode is a continuation where we add new features to a supported package and how to develop and test a flit based package.

Windows vs Ubuntu

Kubuntu is my favorite derivative of all the Ubuntu-based operating systems. I can not point out any features as favorite because I like all of them. Everything mentioned above is part of my daily workflow. Now when you know all of this it is worth trying them out. I was skeptical at first but later when I built my flow and learned how to utilize these features I can do everything faster, with fewer keystrokes and the most important thing is that I have a nicely organized desktop that helps me to minimize brain fatigue while doing my job. Kubuntu is a great distro to switch to if you’re coming from Windows. They have a quite similar UI, and Kubuntu has all the features Windows has, plus more. Read more

KDE: KDevelop 5.3.3 Released, Latte Dock Update and Release of Kaidan 0.4.1

  • KDevelop 5.3.3 released

    We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.3.3. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using a previous version of KDevelop 5.3. You can find a Linux AppImage as well as the source code archives on our download page. Windows installers are no longer offered, we are looking for someone interested to take care of that.

  • Latte, Documentation and Reports...

    First Latte beta release for v0.9.0 is getting ready and I am really happy about it :) . But today instead of talking for the beta release I am going to focus at two last minute "arrivals" for v0.9; that is Layouts Reports and Documentation. If you want to read first the previous article you can do so at Latte and "Flexible" settings...

  • Kaidan 0.4.1 released!

    After some problems were encountered in Kaidan 0.4.1, we tried to fix the most urgent bugs.