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Red Hat

Red Hat's OpenShift 4.0 and CloudForms 4.7

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Red Hat
  • The Modern Software Platform

    This is the first post in an ongoing series which will explore the changes, improvements, and additions we’re planning for the next big release of Red Hat OpenShift, version 4.0. Check in each week for more information that will prepare you for the shift to 4.0.

    From the time the fledgling Kubernetes community met at the Google office in Seattle for our first face-to-face meeting in the fall of 2014, I’ve believed that Kubernetes was a project that would transform how we build and run software. Over the last few years, we’ve seen countless others come around to that point of view (most enthusiastically, some grudgingly). At the same time, the public cloud providers have continued the massive investments in infrastructure and services that make IT and software easier, simpler, and available at a scale that few people anticipated when the decade began.

  • Red Hat CloudForms 4.7 released

    There's an old, wise IT statement: "Never fix what's broken." Of course, there's an equally true tech management thought, which goes: "You snooze, you lose." So, trying to satisfy both the tortoises and hares of IT, Red Hat's newest version of its old-school CloudForms management tool comes ready to integrate with Red Hat's DevOps program of choice: Ansible Tower.

Fedora, Red Hat and IBM

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Red Hat
  • Fedora 30 Will Get Bash 5.0 But Yum's Death Sentence Postponed To F31

    Fedora's Engineering and Steering Committee approved new work around the in-development Fedora 30. 

    Originally Fedora 29 was going to drop the old Yum package manager bits now that the DNF package manager has been in good shape for years and is largely a drop-in replacement to Yum. That didn't happen for Fedora 29 and just recently was proposed to drop Yum 3 for Fedora 30, but with that change coming in late and some tooling bits not ready in time, that has been diverted to Fedora 31. FESCo approves of dropping Yum 3 for Fedora 31 and is hoping it will be removed right after Rawhide branches for F30, giving plenty of time to fix any issues that may come up or other unexpected problems. 

  • Measuring user experience success with building blocks

    PatternFly is an open source design system used by Red Hat to maintain visual consistency and usability across the product portfolio. When the PatternFly team started work on PatternFly 4, the next major version of the system, they focused a large part of their effort on evolving the visual language. But how would users respond to the new look and feel?

    To get the raw and unfiltered feedback the team needed, Sara Chizari, a UXD user researcher, planned a reaction study with a fun twist and then headed to Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

  • Backup partners target Red Hat Ceph Storage

    Red Hat Ceph Storage provides object, block and file data services for organizations modernizing their hybrid-cloud and data analytics infrastructures. With the release of Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2, improved performance and functionality is driving new storage use cases in the modernized datacenter.

    In addition to data security and integrity, organizations must consider their strategy around data protection, backup and archiving. Whether you are backing up your enterprise application data as part of a disaster recovery strategy, or you are performing deep archives of sensitive records, rich media, or regulated data, Red Hat works with industry-leading backup, recovery and archiving partners to certify Ceph as a backup target for your most important data.

  • Effortless API creation with full API lifecycle using Red Hat Integration (Part 1)

    Nowadays, API development with proper lifecycle management often takes days if not weeks to get a simple API service up and running. One of the main reasons behind this is there are always way too many parties involved in the process. Plus there are hours of development and configuration.

  • Announcing Kubernetes-native self-service messaging with Red Hat AMQ Online

    Microservices architecture is taking over software development discussions everywhere. More and more companies are adapting to develop microservices as the core of their new systems. However, when going beyond the “microservices 101” googled tutorial, required services communications become more and more complex. Scalable, distributed systems, container-native microservices, and serverless functions benefit from decoupled communications to access other dependent services. Asynchronous (non-blocking) direct or brokered interaction is usually referred to as messaging.

    Managing and setting up messaging infrastructure components for development use was usually a long prerequisite task requiring several days on the project calendar. Need a queue or topic? Wait at least a couple weeks. Raise a ticket with your infrastructure operations team, grab a large cup of coffee, and pray for them to have some time to provision it. When your development team is adopting an agile approach, waiting days for infrastructure is not acceptable.

  • Settling In With IBM i For The Long Haul

    If nothing else, the IBM i platform has exhibited extraordinary longevity. One might even say legendary longevity, if you want to take its history all the way back to the System/3 minicomputer from 1969. This is the real starting point in the AS/400 family tree and this is when Big Blue, for very sound legal and technical and marketing reasons, decided to fork its products to address the unique needs of large enterprises (with the System/360 mainframe and its follow-ons) and small and medium businesses (starting with the System/3 and moving on through the System/34, System/32, System/38, and System/36 in the 1970s and early 1980s and passing through the AS/400, AS/400e, iSeries, System i, and then IBM i on Power Systems platforms.

    It has been a long run indeed, and many customers who have invested in the platform started way back then and there with the early versions of RPG and moved their applications forward and changed them as their businesses evolved and the depth and breadth of corporate computing changed, moving on up through RPG II, RPG III, RPG IV, ILE RPG, and now RPG free form. Being on this platform for even three decades makes you a relative newcomer.

Fedora: The Post-IBM Fedora Logo Redesign and Changes, openQA

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Logo Redesign Update (Spoiler: It’s Looking Great)

    Last month we mentioned that the folks involved with Fedora were scoping out feedback on a potential redesign of the Fedora logo and typeface.

    A number of possible designs were put forward, and based on the reaction the post got it’s clear a lot of you had very strong opinions on the revamp ideas!

    Well, things have moved on a bit since then.

  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-06

    I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • New openQA tests: update live image build/install

    Hot on the heels of adding installer image build/install tests to openQA, I’ve now added tests which do just the same, but for the Workstation live image.

    That means that, when running the desktop tests for an update, openQA will also run a test that builds a Workstation live image and a test that boots and installs it. The packages from the update will be used – if relevant – in the live image creation environment, and included in the live image itself. This will allow us to catch problems in updates that relate to the build and basic functionality of live images.

Fedora logo redesign

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Red Hat

The current Fedora Logo has been used by Fedora and the Fedora Community since 2005. However, over the past few months, Máirín Duffy and the Fedora Design team, along with the wider Fedora community have been working on redesigning the Fedora logo.

Far from being just an arbitrary logo change, this process is being undertaken to solve a number of issues encountered with the current logo. Some of the issues with the current logo include the lack of a single colour variant, and, consequently the logo not working well on dark backgrounds. Other challenges with the current logo is confusion with other well-known brands, and the use of a proprietary font.

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Servers: Red Hat, SUSE, and Debian

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Red Hat
Server
Debian
SUSE

Red Hat

  • BlueStore: Improved performance with Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2

    Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2 is now available! The big news with this release is full support for the BlueStore Ceph backend, offering significantly increased performance for both object and block applications.

  • Which open source backup solution do you use?

    Even though lots of our data exists in the cloud today, you still need to protect your local files with a reliable backup solution. When I needed a new offsite backup solution for my Linux desktop files, I asked my editors and fellow Community Moderators at Opensource.com to share their recommendations. They provided some familiar and some new-to-me options.

  • From The Enterprisers Project: 9 Kubernetes Jobs Facts and Figures
  • 12 ways to get smarter about Kubernetes

    Kubernetes adoption is growing at a rapid clip, yet this is still new technology for most folks. That means that many people in IT, from the C-suite through the most junior positions, are still getting up to speed on the basics and what comes next: What is Kubernetes, what do IT teams use it for, what are the overlapping trends, what are the day-to-day realities, and so forth.

    Fortunately, many accessible resources can help you smooth out the learning curve. Below, we curate some of our favorites. The goal here isn’t to achieve deep technical expertise, but rather to help you beef up your general Kubernetes IQ.

    Doing so can help IT leaders and their teams better understand why Kubernetes has become one of the hottest open source projects around. You’ll also want to delve into its relationship with other significant trends such as containers, cloud-native development, multi-cloud, and hybrid cloud – and yes, dig into the nuts and bolts of the technology itself.

  • CYBG Supports 25x More Customer Logins on iB Digital Services Platform with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

SUSE:

  • Anyone Can Benchmark + openSUSE Challenge | Choose Linux 2

    Episode 2 is all about opposites, such as the major differences between benchmarking graphics cards like Radeon VII on Linux and Windows. Then we dive into the Phoronix Test Suite, a robust tool that isn’t just for tech reviewers. Find out why you should be using it too.

    Plus, the distro challenges roll on as Jason decides to do a complete 180, jumping from elementary OS to openSUSE Tumbleweed.

  • Deliver Applications Faster – Here’s How

    Join us for an executive level overview of the path your business can take to reduce application delivery cycle times and increase business agility. We’ll discuss emerging container technologies, cloud native application architectures, DevOps processes, and ways you can use them together to effect the change you need. Discover how SUSE can help you deliver your applications faster!

  • Explore options for SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 Service Pack 4, End-of-Life Mar 31, 2019

    General support for SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 product family, including SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications 11 will be ending on March 31, 2019.

Debian:

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in January 2019

    This month I accepted 363 packages, which is again more than last month. On the other side I rejected 68 uploads, which is almost twice as last month. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 494.

  • Review of Debian System Administrator’s Handbook

    Debian System Administrator’s Handbook is a free-to-download book that covers all the essential part of Debian that a sysadmin might need.

    This has been on my to-do review list for quite some time. The book was started by two French Debian Developers Raphael Hertzog and Roland Mas to increase awareness about the Debian project in France. The book was a huge hit among francophone Linux users. The English translation followed soon after that.

'Community' Distros: Fedora, Antergos 19.2, and OpenSUSE 15.1 Alpha

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Strategy FAQ Part 2: What does this mean for me?

    Packagers remain free to provide software at the versions and cadence they wish. However, that doesn’t mean they can block others providing the same software in different versions and cadence. For example, if you only want to work on the very latest version of a particular piece of software as it comes from upstream, that’s cool — but you have to leave room for someone else who wants to maintaining older releases of that same software.

    This isn’t necessarily new — we’ve seen this with, for example, co-maintainers where one person works on the main Fedora OS package and someone else maintains an EPEL branch. But this goes further with features and even bugs. Perhaps a Fedora solution like CoreOS or the Fedora KDE Plasma desktop needs a slightly different version than the “main” one to enable (or strip down) some particular feature. That’s okay! We have multiple stream branches to allow this.

    The same is true for changes and other ideas, including greater automation in packaging. Perhaps someone wants to provide a stream where updates are automatically triggered when upstream makes a release. Or maybe someone wants to try out a whole new way of generating specfiles from templates. We don’t block people out, instead we provide options. There is no obligation for packagers or others to provide all possible options, but we also don’t want to restrict those options from being provided by someone who is interested.

  • Máirín Duffy: Fedora logo redesign update
  • Antergos 19.2 run through
  • openSUSE 15.1 alpha run through

    In this video, we look at openSUSE 15.1 alpha.

4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February 2019

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Red Hat
Software

COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

Read more

Fedora's FESCo Approves Of A "Sane" Approach For Counting Fedora Users Via DNF

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Red Hat

Monday's weekly Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee approved of a means for the DNF package manager to integrate some user counting capabilities as long as it's a "sane" approach and not the UUID-driven proposal originally laid out.

Originally the plan was to come up with a new UUID identifier system just for counting Fedora users so those in the Fedora project and at Red Hat can have a better idea for the number of Fedora users and other insights. But the concept of having a unique identifier for Fedora users wasn't well received, even if it was trying to not track users or reveal other personal information.

Read more

Upcoming openSUSE and Fedora Voting (Board Elections and Wallpapers)

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Voting Gets Underway for the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections

    The ballots are out and the 2-week voting process to choose three Board Members in the 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections now gets underway, with a total of seven top quality Candidates running.

    If you are an openSUSE Member, you should have received an email with the elections url and your credential to log in and cast your vote. If you did not receive this e-mail, and if you are a qualified Member, you must contact the Elections Committee immediately.  You may cast your vote starting now and until February 15, 2019. You may also update your vote within this time-frame should you wish to do so. The election ballots will close February 15, 2019 at 23h00 UTC.

  • Fedora 30 – Supplemental Wallpaper

    The voting process happens inside Nuancier so you can go now and vote, dont forget to claim the badge, its not given by hand.

  • Fedora 29 : The Piskel application.

Red Hat: Jim Whitehurst, SpringPeople and Fedora Badges

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Red Hat
  • How do you plan when planning is dead?

    In May 2017, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst drew a stark conclusion in his keynote presentation at the annual Red Hat Summit event in San Francisco: "Planning as we know it is dead." He said those same words again during a Red Hat planning session in October of 2018, when a cross-functional group of Red Hat leaders assembled to assess the current state of the business and discuss the roadmap for the coming year.

  • SpringPeople partners with Red Hat on IT training

    In a bid to realise its goal of upskilling 20,000 IT workforce in India by 2020, Bengaluru-based enterprise IT training provider SpringPeople on Monday announced a partnership with leading open source solutions provider Red Hat.

    The partnership is aimed at bringing to the Indian IT industry a comprehensive portfolio of globally renowned certification courses on Cloud computing, DevOps and middleware technologies.

  • Design new Fedora Badges with the style guide
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More in Tux Machines

Server Leftovers

  • Google Open Sources Sandboxed API
    Google on Monday announced that it has made available its Sandboxed API as open source in an effort to make it easier for software developers to create secure products. It’s not uncommon for applications to be affected by memory corruption or other types of vulnerabilities that can be exploited for remote code execution and other purposes. Using a sandbox ensures that the code responsible for processing user input can only access the resources it needs to, which mitigates the impact of a flaw by containing the exploit to a restricted environment and preventing it from interacting with other software components. While sandboxing can be highly useful, Google says it’s often not easy to implement. That is why the internet giant has decided to open source its Sandboxed API, which should make it easier to sandbox C and C++ libraries. The company has also open sourced its core sandboxing project, Sandbox2, which can be used on its own to secure Linux processes.
  • BMC Touches Clouds with Job Scheduler
    Clouds are growing quickly as IT executives look to find more flexibility and cut costs by adopting cloud and software as a service (SaaS) applications. But most enterprises aren’t getting rid of all their on-premise systems, which means somebody needs to connect those cloud and on-premise systems. One of those “somebodies” is BMC Software.
  • Midnight Commander Comes To IBM i
    IBM i professionals who work extensively with files in the IFS will be happy to hear a new software utility has been ported to the IBM i PASE environment that could save them a bunch of time. The open source software, called Midnight Commander, gives developers and administrators a handy command line experience that can help speed up tasks, especially when giving commands to large number of files stored on remote machines. Midnight Commander was originally developed in 1994 as a file utility for UNIX, which was beginning to emerge from software labs to challenge minicomputer platforms of the day, such as the AS/400, as well as early Windows operating systems. Miguel de Icaza, who’s known for founding the Mono project (among others), is credited with creating Midnight Commander, but over the years development of the product has become a group effort. The utility, which is distributed via a GNU license from www.midnightcommander.org, was largely modeled off Norton Commander, an MS-DOS utility developed in the 1980s by Norton. But Midnight Commander has evolved into its own thing over the years, and the resemblance to that old Norton product today largely is only in the name.

Top 10 New Linux SBCs to Watch in 2019

A recent Global Market Insights report projects the single board computer market will grow from $600 million in 2018 to $1 billion by 2025. Yet, you don’t need to read a market research report to realize the SBC market is booming. Driven by the trends toward IoT and AI-enabled edge computing, new boards keep rolling off the assembly lines, many of them tailored for highly specific applications. Much of the action has been in Linux-compatible boards, including the insanely popular Raspberry Pi. The number of different vendors and models has exploded thanks in part to the rise of community-backed, open-spec SBCs. Here we examine 10 of the most intriguing, Linux-driven SBCs among the many products announced in the last four weeks that bookended the recent Embedded World show in Nuremberg. (There was also some interesting Linux software news at the show.) Two of the SBCs—the Intel Whiskey Lake based UP Xtreme and Nvidia Jetson Nano driven Jetson Nano Dev Kit—were announced only this week. Read more

Fedora: Systemd, AskFedora, Varnish

Mozilla, Firefox and ChromeOS/Chrome

  • Sharing our Common Voices
    From the onset, our vision for Common Voice has been to build the world’s most diverse voice dataset, optimized for building voice technologies. We also made a promise of openness: we would make the high quality, transcribed voice data that was collected publicly available to startups, researchers, and anyone interested in voice-enabled technologies. Today, we’re excited to share our first multi-language dataset with 18 languages represented, including English, French, German and Mandarin Chinese (Traditional), but also for example Welsh and Kabyle. Altogether, the new dataset includes approximately 1,400 hours of voice clips from more than 42,000 people. With this release, the continuously growing Common Voice dataset is now the largest ever of its kind, with tens of thousands of people contributing their voices and original written sentences to the public domain (CC0). Moving forward, the full dataset will be available for download on the Common Voice site.
  • Mozilla GFX: WebRender newsletter #42
    WebRender is a GPU based 2D rendering engine for web written in Rust, currently powering Mozilla’s research web browser servo and on its way to becoming Firefox‘s rendering engine.
  • Firefox UX: Look over here! Results from a Firefox user research study about interruptions.
    The Attention War. There have been many headlines related to it in the past decade. This is the idea that apps and companies are stealing attention. It’s the idea that technologists throw up ads on websites in a feeble attempt to get the attention of the people who visit the website. In tech, or any industry really, people often say something to the effect of, “well if the person using this product or service only read the instructions, or clicked on the message, or read our email, they’d understand and wouldn’t have any problems”. We need people’s attention to provide a product experience or service. We’re all in the “attention war”, product designers and users alike. And what’s a sure-fire way to grab someone’s attention? Interruptions. Regardless if they’re good, bad, or neutral. Interruptions are not necessarily a “bad” thing, they can also lead to good behavior, actions, or knowledge.
  • Google Releases Chrome 73 Update for Linux, Windows, and macOS
    Google has just released an update for Chrome 73, the major update of the browser that was shipped to all supported platforms earlier this month. Now at version 73.0.3683.86, Google Chrome comes with under-the-hood improvements on Windows, Linux, and macOS, and you can download it using the links here.
  • Google will implement a Microsoft-style browser picker for EU Android devices
     

    We don't have many details on exactly how Google's new search and browser picker will work; there's just a single paragraph in the company's blog post. Google says it will "do more to ensure that Android phone owners know about the wide choice of browsers and search engines available to download to their phones. This will involve asking users of existing and new Android devices in Europe which browser and search apps they would like to use."

  • EU hits Google with fine for abuse of AdSense service
     

    The European Commission has hit search giant Google with a third fine, related to abuse of its AdSense advertising service, and told the company to fork out €1.49 billion (A$2.38 billion) for breaching EU anti-trust rules.  

  • The EU fines Google $1.69 billion for bundling search and advertising
     

    Google and the EU's European Commission are making all sorts of announcements lately. Fresh off the revelation that Google would implement a browser and search-engine picker in EU-sold Android devices, Google's advertising division is getting slapped with a fine next, to the tune of €1.5 billion ($1.69 billion). The European Commission's latest antitrust ruling says that Google's bundling of its advertising platform with its custom search engine program is anti-competitive toward other ad providers.