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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat Leftovers

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  • Red Hat Advances Container Storage

    Red Hat has moved to make storage a standard element of a container platform with the release of version 3.1 of Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage (OCS), previously known as Red Hat Container Native Storage.

    Irshad Raihan, senior manager for product marketing for Red Hat Storage, says Red Hat decided to rebrand its container storage offering to better reflect its tight integration with the Red Hat OpenShift platform. In addition, the term “container native” continues to lose relevance given all the different flavors of container storage that now exist, adds Raihan.

    The latest version of the container storage software from Red Hat adds arbiter volume support to enable high availability with efficient storage utilization and better performance, enhanced storage monitoring and configuration via the Red Hat implementation of the Prometheus container monitoring framework, and block-backed persistent volumes (PVs) that can be applied to both general application workloads and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP) infrastructure workloads. Support for PVs is especially critical because to in the case of Red Hat OCS organizations can deploy more than 1,000 PVs per cluster, which helps to reduce cluster sprawl within the IT environment, says Raihan.

  • Is Red Hat Inc’s (NYSE:RHT) ROE Of 20.72% Sustainable?
  • FPgM report: 2018-33

Lennart Jern: How Do You Fedora?

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Interviews

Lennart Jern is a Swedish-speaking Finn, who has been living in Umeå, Sweden, for about three years. He was born and raised in southern Finland where he obtained his master’s degree in applied mathematics. His time at university exposed Lennart’s true passion. “While at the university, I realized that computer science was really what I wanted to work with.” In order to follow his dream of working in computer science he moved to Sweden with his wife to pursue a master’s program in computer science. After a short while he had learned enough to land a job with a local startup. “I’m working with cloud/distributed systems, specifically with tools like kubernetes and OpenShift.”

Lennart’s first contact with Linux was in 2006. Some of the computers in his high school were running OpenSuse. He installed Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron in 2008 and has been using Linux ever since.

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Red Hat News/Leftovers

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Red Hat and Flock

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CentOS Linux 7.5 Operating System Is Now Available for IBM POWER9 Architecture

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Released back in May 2018, CentOS Linux 7.5 is based on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 operating system and supported 32-bit (i386), 64-bit (x86_64), ARM64 (AArch64), PowerPC 64-bit Little Endian (PPC64el), PowerPC 64-bit (PPC64), and ARMhf architectures. However, the initial release only supported IBM POWER8 processors, but it's now available for IBM POWER9 processors too.

"I am pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 7 (1804) for POWER9 processors (ppc64le - powerpc 64-bit little endian). This release is derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.5 ALT," said James O'Connor. "Note this release is 99% equivalent to the existing CentOS 7 Linux 7 (1804) for POWER8 processors (ppc64le - powerpc 64-bit little endian)."

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Ubuntu, Debian, RHEL, and CentOS Linux Now Patched Against "Foreshadow" Attacks

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Security
Debian
Ubuntu

Both Canonical and Red Hat emailed us with regards to the L1 Terminal Fault security vulnerability, which are documented as CVE-2018-3620 for operating systems and System Management Mode (SMM), CVE-2018-3646 for impacts to virtualization, as well as CVE-2018-3615 for Intel Software Guard Extensions (Intel SGX). They affect all Linux-based operating system and machines with Intel CPUs.

"It was discovered that memory present in the L1 data cache of an Intel CPU core may be exposed to a malicious process that is executing on the CPU core. This vulnerability is also known as L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF). A local attacker in a guest virtual machine could use this to expose sensitive information (memory from other guests or the host OS)," reads the Ubuntu security advisory.

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Red Hat News

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Fedora News and Red Hat Shares

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Flock 2018 Reports

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More in Tux Machines

EEE, Entryism and Openwashing

  • New Linux distro specifically designed for Windows comes to the Microsoft Store [Ed: WLinux or Whitewater Foundry not the first time people exploit Microsoft to put a price tag on FOSS such as LibreOffice. Microsoft is doing a fine job sabotaging the GNU/Linux 'ecosystem'.]
    WLinux is based on Debian, and the developer, Whitewater Foundry, claims their custom distro will also allow faster patching of security and compatibility issues that appear from time to time between upstream distros and WSL. [...] In return for saving developers time Whitewater Foundry is charging $19.99 (though the app is currently 50% off and the distribution can be downloaded from Github for free).
  • Open source dev gets Win32 apps running on Xbox One [Ed: Running blobs on two DRM platforms does not make you "Open source dev"]
  • Building Blocks of Secure Development: How to Make Open Source Work for You [Ed: Veracode self-promotion in "webinar" form, badmouthing FOSS to push their proprietary things. They work with Microsoft.]
  • SD Times open source project of the week: TonY [Ed: Openwashing of a surveillance operation at Microsoft]
    Unsatisfied with the available solutions for connecting the analytics-generating power of their TensorFlow machine learning implementations with the scalable data computation and storage capabilities of their Apache Hadoop clusters, developers at LinkedIn decided that they’d take matters into their own hands with the development of this week’s highlighted project, TonY.
  • Open Source: Automating Release Notes in Github [Ed: The New York Times is still propping up Microsoft hosting]
  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture [Ed: Calling furniture "open"]
    Opendesk customers can now use augmented reality to see how the furniture brand's pieces look in their homes before ordering them from local makers. The augmented-reality (AR) experience launched with the arrival of Apple's iOS 12 operating system this week. It enables customers to use their smartphones to view some of Opendesk's furniture superimposed on the room in front of them.
  • Open Source Testing Startup Cypress Leaves Beta With Thousands of Users, Launches Paid Plans [Ed: This is not Open Source; they misuse the label and even put dashes ("open-source") because they know they're faking it.]
    Cypress.io‘s CEO Drew Lanham explains that the startup’s tool is software created by developers, for developers. The company was founded in 2014 by technologist Brian Mann, after observing that while computing and application development had changed drastically over the past decade, software testing had not. Large companies now release thousands of software updates a year, often on a daily basis across their organization. Technology teams aim to move rapidly, iterating on an agile basis and working in parallel so they can sync their code together even faster. But, as Lanham explains, the testing software out there was far outdated for these agile processes.
  • Kindred Introduces SenseAct, the First Reinforcement Learning Open-Source Toolkit for Physical Robots [Ed: Kindred or SenseAct not actually FOSS; but they sure try to make it seem that way, by focusing on a toolkit.]

Top Linux Distros for Software Developers

A major factor in the choice of Linux distro is your personal preference. You may try one of the most popular Linux distros but find that you prefer one that’s less often used. Your experience with Linux will also factor into which distro is suited to you. With the benefits Linux can offer — including flexibility, stability, and support — it’s worth evaluating your options. Read more

Source Code From Deutsche Telekom

  • Edge compute platform is open source
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have partnered for the creation of an Open Source, low latency Edge compute platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster.
  • Deutsche Telekom and Aricent Create Open Source Edge Software Framework
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent today announced the creation of an Open Source, Low Latency Edge Compute Platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster. The cost-effective Edge platform is built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and is decentralized, to accelerate the deployment of ultra-low latency applications. The joint solution will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • DT and Aricent announce telco Open Source Edge framework for 5G
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have announced the creation of an Open Source Edge software framework, designed especially for developers, platform-as-a-service and cloud-native multi-access edge computing technologies and on-track to intersect with the deployment of 5G enabled network edge facilities to tackle ultra-low latency network applications. The Edge platform has been built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent brew up edge compute platform for 5G apps and services
    In order to speed up the rollout of 5G applications and services, Duetsche Telekom and Aricent have teamed up to build an edge compute platform. The open source, edge software framework was built for use in software-defined data centers in decentralized locations. It also uses cloud-native multiaccess edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent Bridge Cloud Native, Telco MEC Gap
    German telecom giant Deutsche Telekom and Aricent threw their collective weight behind an open source edge computing platform targeted at software-defined data centers (SDDC). The initiative gamely joins a growing list of open source multi-access edge computing (MEC) initiatives. The DT-Aricent collaboration is at its core a decentralized platform designed to help telecom operators develop and launch low-latency 5G mobile applications and services. It includes a software framework with features delivered through a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) model.

Android Leftovers