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Red Hat

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat News and Developments

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  • The GNOME Infrastructure is moving to Openshift

    The cluster consists of 3 master nodes (controllers, api, etcd), 4 compute nodes and 2 infrastructure nodes (internal docker registry, cluster console, haproxy-based routers, SSL edge termination). For the persistent storage we’re currently making good use of the Red Hat Gluster Storage (RHGS) product that Red Hat is kindly sponsoring together with the Openshift subscriptions. For any app that might require a database we have an external (as not managed as part of Openshift) fully redundant, synchronous, multi-master MariaDB cluster based on Galera (2 data nodes, 1 arbiter).

    The release we’re currently running is the recently released 3.11, which comes with the so-called “Cluster Console”, a web UI that allows you to manage a wide set of the underlying objects that previously were only available to the oc cli client and with a set of Monitoring and Metrics toolings (Prometheus, Grafana) that can be accessed as part of the Cluster Console (Grafana dashboards that show how the cluster is behaving) or externally via their own route.

  • OpenShift Commons Gathering Seattle Announces Speakers from Intel, GE, Progressive, HealthPartners, TicketMaster, USAA and more!

    The OpenShift Commons Gathering brings together experts from all over the world to discuss the container technologies, best practices for cloud-native application developers and the open source software projects that underpin the OpenShift ecosystem to help take us all to the next level in cloud-native computing. This final Gathering of 2018 will feature 400+ developers, project leads, cloud architects, DevOps professionals, sysadmins, and cloud-native practitioners coming together to explore the next steps in making container technologies successful and secure at scale.

  • Modernize your application deployment with Lift and Shift

    For many software modernization projects, it’s all about learning to love, lift, and shift. No, wait. It’s all about learning to love lift and shift. The basic idea behind lift and shift is to modernize how an existing application is packaged and deployed. Because it’s not about rewriting the application itself, lift and shift is typically quick to implement.

    Modern development environments rely on containers for packaging and deployment. A modern environment also uses a continuous integration / continuous deployment (CI/CD) system that automatically builds, tests, and deploys an application whenever its source code changes.

  • Istio on OpenShift: Technology Preview 2 of Service Mesh Now Available

    It’s been a few weeks since the release of the first tech preview of Istio on OpenShift. Since then a lot has happened, and we are happy to announce the availability of our second tech preview release.

    In this release we are adding a whole new user interface from the upstream Kiali project. The Kiali user interface can help Istio users understand what’s happening in their service mesh, canl show how the various components are connected, and can help to detect issues (HTTP 500, pod not started, misconfigurations) to better fix those.

  • Insider Selling: Red Hat Inc (RHT) EVP Sells 960 Shares of Stock
  • Featured Stock: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Scout Investments Inc. Acquires 3,034 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Get "The Art of Modern Application Development" the Red Hat way - eBook, free [Ed: Apparently a paid-for ad]

Fedora 29 Is Blocked From Release Due To 11 Open Bugs

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Fedora 29 will not be managing to deliver its final release right on time due to lingering blocker bugs.

At the first Fedora 29 Final meeting today it was declared a No-Go for releasing next week on 23 October as had been planned.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Fedora: Flock, Flatpaks, Fedora/RISC-V and More

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  • CommOps takeaways from Flock 2018

    The annual Fedora contributor conference, Flock, took place from August 8-11, 2018. Several members of the Community Operations (CommOps) team were present for the conference. We also held a half-day team sprint for team members and interested people to participate and share feedback with the team.

  • Flatpaks, sandboxes and security

    Last week the Flatpak community woke to the “news” that we are making the world a less secure place and we need to rethink what we’re doing. Personally, I’m not sure this is a fair assessment of the situation. The “tl;dr” summary is: Flatpak confers many benefits besides the sandboxing, and even looking just at the sandboxing, improving app security is a huge problem space and so is a work in progress across multiple upstream projects. Much of what has been achieved so far already delivers incremental improvements in security, and we’re making solid progress on the wider app distribution and portability problem space.

    Sandboxing, like security in general, isn’t a binary thing – you can’t just say because you have a sandbox, you have 100% security. Like having two locks on your front door, two front doors, or locks on your windows too, sensible security is about defense in depth. Each barrier that you implement precludes some invalid or possibly malicious behaviour. You hope that in total, all of these barriers would prevent anything bad, but you can never really guarantee this – it’s about multiplying together probabilities to get a smaller number. A computer which is switched off, in a locked faraday cage, with no connectivity, is perfectly secure – but it’s also perfectly useless because you cannot actually use it. Sandboxing is very much the same – whilst you could easily take systemd-nspawn, Docker or any other container technology of choice and 100% lock down a desktop app, you wouldn’t be able to interact with it at all.

  • Fedora/RISC-V now mirrored as a Fedora “alternative” architecture
  • PSA: System update fails when trying to remove rtkit-0.11-19.fc29

Fedora: A Look at Fedora Workstation 29 and NeuroFedora Update

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  • Fedora Workstation 29 Is Looking Up To Be Another Impressive Release, Looking Great

    In addition to Ubuntu 18.10 releasing soon, Fedora 29 is set to be release by month's end if all goes well.

    I have been running the latest Fedora 29 packages on a number of test boxes and overall it's been running great. Yes, for the past few years I've been back to running Fedora on my main production system (after a few years of a falling out but besides that being a big user going back to the Fedora Core days), but Fedora 29 in particular is feeling really quite polished and great.

  • NeuroFedora update: week 41

    In week 41, we finally announced NeuroFedora to the community on the mailing list and on the Fedora Community Blog. So, it is officially a thing!

    There is a lot of software available in NeuroFedora already. You can see the list here. If you use software that is not on our list, please suggest it to us using the suggestion form.

Red Hat: Open Source Is A Great Business

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For years I've heard enthusiasts talking about the open source potential: “It will take over the proprietary code.” Others argued that open source was a value destroyer for businesses relying on intellectual property.

The years went by, and in my mind, open source remained more of a hobbyist thing than anything else. However, the state-of-affairs seldom remains unchanged for long, and the truth is the open source development model, during the last fifteen years, silently morphed by focusing on enterprise IT services.

In my opinion, that was the way to go. Enterprises were more willing to experiment in new IT solutions. And in some cases, they desperately needed those advances to survive. Some companies, with critical systems, needed the flexibility to patch adapt or correct code in-house. On the other end of the spectrum, the regular user that freaks out when an error message pops-up, was never going to mass-adopt something that is far from being a final polished product. Linux and open source are not for them, as Apple explored through gorgeous plug-and-play solutions.

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More in Tux Machines

Results: Linux Foundation Technical Board Election 2018

The results of the 2018 election for members of the Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory Board have been posted; the members elected this time around are Chris Mason, Laura Abbott, Olof Johansson, Dan Williams, and Kees Cook. Abbott and Cook are new members to the board this time around. (The other TAB members are Ted Ts'o, Greg Kroah-Hartman, Jonathan Corbet, Tim Bird, and Steve Rostedt). Read more

10 Linux Commands For Network Diagnostics

It is difficult to find a Linux computer that is not connected to the network, be it server or workstation. From time to time it becomes necessary to diagnose faults, intermittence or slowness in the network. In this article, we will review some of the Linux commands most used for network diagnostics. Read
more

Variscite unveils its first i.MX8X module

Variscite’s “VAR-SOM-MX8X” COM runs Linux or Android on NXP’s up to quad -A35 core i.MX8X SoC with up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC, plus WiFi/BT, dual GbE controllers, and -40 to 85°C support. Variscite has launched its first i.MX8X-based computer-on-module. The 67.6 x 51.6mm VAR-SOM-MX8X runs Yocto Project based Linux or Android on NXP’s dual- or quad-core Cortex-A35 based, 1.2GHz i.MX8X. The up to -40 to 85°C tolerant module is aimed at industrial automation and control, defense, medical, telematics, building control, failover displays/HMI, and robotics applications. The only other i.MX8X module we’ve seen is Phytec’s Linux-compatible, 55 x 40mm phyCORE-i.MX 8X module. Read more

today's leftovers

  • freenode #live 2018 - Doc Searls and Simon Phipps - In Conversation
  • How to edit themes in Linux Mint Cinnamon - Tutorial
  • KDE Bugsquad – Okular Bug Day on November 17th, 2018
    Thank you to everyone who participated last Bug Day! We had a turnout of about six people, who worked through about half of the existing REPORTED (unconfirmed) Konsole bugs. Lots of good discussion occurred on #kde-bugs as well, thank you for joining the channel and being part of the team! We will be holding a Bug Day on November 17th, 2018, focusing on Okular. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!
  • Omarine 5.3 released! (Nov 14 2018)
    This release updates dbus and glib together with all dependencies and related packages. Some of them are rebuilt, the rest are upgraded. Glib 2.58.1 can be considered a development threshold because many dependent packages must be caught it up. Below is a list of some typically upgraded packages:
  • Achievement unlocked! I spoke at PythonBrasil[14]
    PythonBrasil is the national Python community conference that happens every year, usually in October, in Brazil. I attended PythonBrasil for the first time in 2016, the year we had started PyLadies Porto Alegre. Back then, we were a very small group and I was the only one to go. It was definitely one of the best experiences I ever had, which, of course, set a very high standard for every single tech event I attended afterwards. Because of the great time I had there, I wanted to bring more and more women from PyLadies Porto Alegre to experience PythonBrasil in the next editions. So, during the PyLadies Porto Alegre 1st birthday party, I encouraged the other women to submit activities to try and to go to the conference that would happen in Belo Horizonte.
  • Browser Based Open Source Image Optimization Tool Squoosh Comes To Google Lab’s Latest Release
    Open source, browser-based image optimization tool Squoosh is Google’s new Chrome Lab release. This new web tool is meant to make web developers work a lot simpler to optimize web pages. Images loading in a website is usually the reason for them to take so long to load and Squoosh helps web developers shrink the image so that it consumes lesser data. Squoosh can downsize, compress, and reformat images. Its purpose is to make web developers’ work less tedious and hence quicker. Google chrome labs made this tool available offline and said it would be handy to have this tool work offline. Squoosh also supports editing image codecs that are not normally available in the browser.
  • VS Code Live Share plugin [Ed: When GNU/Linux sites help Microsoft]
  • Microsoft Releases Open-Source HLSL to GLSL Shader Cross-Compiler [Ed: As above, except this is just openwashing of proprietary DX]
  • Upgrading OpenBSD 6.3 to 6.4 on Vultr
  • iGNUit has a new homepage address
  • gxmessage has a new homepage
  • It Looks Like The Raptor Blackbird Open-Source Motherboard Will Sell For Just Under $900
    Many have been curious to learn more about the Blackbird from Raptor Computing Systems as a lower-cost POWER9, open-source hardware alternative to their higher-end Talos II hardware that we've been recently benchmarking. The possible price has been revealed.  Overnight, Raptor Computing Systems tweeted a straw poll looking to gauge the interest level in "Would you pre-order a Raptor Computing Systems Blackbird system or board this year at a mainboard cost of $875?"
  • C++20 Making Progress On Modules, Memory Model Updates
    This past week was an ISO C++ committee meeting in San Diego, which happened to be their largest meeting ever, and they managed to accomplish a lot in drafting more planned changes around the C++20 language update.