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Red Hat

Fedora and Red Hat: Fedora 29 Next Week, PHP Builds, and Red Hat's Ramblings

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  • Fedora 29 Is Cleared For Release Next Tuesday

    After it was delayed last week, the beautiful Fedora 29 will greet the world next week. 

    Fedora 29 has ended up being another great release that's running well and looking great from the Fedora Workstation perspective. It's also exciting on the Fedora Silverblue front for replacing what was Atomic Workstation. There's also new features on the server front too. All around, there's plenty of new features in Fedora 29.

  • PHP version 7.1.24RC1 and 7.2.12RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in remi-test repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages.

  • Knative: Configuration, Routes and Revisions

    In Part-1 of this series, you were introduced on how deploy your first serverless service using Knative Serving and in Part-2 you were able to understand how to build the serverless services using Knative Build.

  • This is not the root cause you're looking for

    The IT industry is going through a paradigm shift from monolithic to microservices systems. Microservices provide a huge benefit allowing rapid software development and decreasing time to market (TTM), but it also requires a shift in processes and mindsets as we have seen. Adapting to microservices’ needs is crucial and delaying your adaptation will just increase your technical debt, and if there is one thing we have learned throughout past years is, technical debt finds a way to be repaid, but with interest.

  • Welcome Apache Kafka to the Kubernetes Era!

    We have pretty exciting news this week as Red Hat is announcing the General Availability of their Apache Kafka Kubernetes operator. Red Hat AMQ Streams delivers the mechanisms for managing Apache Kafka on top of OpenShift, our enterprise distribution for Kubernetes.

    Everything started last May 2018 when David Ingham (@dingha) unveiled the Developer Preview as new addition to the Red Hat AMQ offering. Red Hat AMQ Streams focuses on running Apache Kafka on OpenShift. In the microservices world, where several components need to rely on a high throughput communication mechanism, Apache Kafka has made a name for itself for being a leading real-time, distributed messaging platform for building data pipelines and streaming applications.

    A leader in the traditional infrastructure deployments, Apache Kafka was missing pieces to be a easily usable container-native citizen in the new Kubernetes era. As a result, a team grouped in 2017 to create the upstream Strimzi project. This team worked to apply the new operator pattern to solve the gaps. With the development of new components deployed along the traditional Apache Kafka broker, these new Kubernetes operators are now able to manage cluster wide resources as well as entities as topics and authentication users.

  • Must be in your Portfolio: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Gentex Corporation (GNTX)

Red Hat and Fedora: GCC, Asia Pacific Banks, NVIDIA 'AI' Boxes, COPR and Thunderbolt

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Red Hat
  • GCC 8 and tools now in beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7

    We are pleased to announce the immediate availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 8 beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7.  

  • How Red Hat is addressing the digital woes of APAC’s financial services sector

    Several financial institutions across the Asia Pacific have adopted Red Hat hybrid cloud architectures and practices, in a concerted effort to become more agile while reducing costs and more effectively managing risks.
    The regional banks that have adopted the open source vendor’s technology include Malaysia’s AmBank Group, Indonesia’s PT Bank Tabungan Pensiunan Nasional Tbk, Indonesia’s Bank BRI, China’s China Merchants Bank, Taiwan’s Cathay United Bank, and Japan’s Fukuoka Financial Group.

  • Red Hat, NVIDIA regulate on open source offerings to accelerate emerging workloads like artificial intelligence

    Red Hat announced on Tuesday that it is collaborating with NVIDIA to bring a new wave of open innovation around emerging workloads like artificial intelligence (AI), deep learning and data science to enterprise data centers around the world.

    Driving this effort is the certification of enterprise Linux platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, on NVIDIA DGX-1 systems. This certification provides a foundation for the rest of the Red Hat portfolio, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, to be deployed and jointly supported on NVIDIA’s AI supercomputers.

    As NVIDIA DGX-1 systems enter the datacenter to provide powerful AI platforms, IT teams will often want to manage and maintain these systems within their existing operations, which frequently are Red Hat Enterprise Linux-based.

  • Red Hat Certifies Linux for NVIDIA AI Boxes

    Red Hat cozied up even further with NVIDIA yesterday, certifying its Enterprise Linux platform on the GPU vendor’s DGX-1 machine learning boxes.

    The announcement makes it easier for enterprises to manage their machine learning training on their own premises, the Linux vendor said.

    Under the deal, existing Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscriptions are eligible for use on DGX-1 systems. It also opens up certified applications developed for Red Hat’s Linux system to DGX-1 users. Red Hat is going beyond certification by optimizing its Linux for DGX-1 using tuned profiles for the NVIDIA platform. This draws on the tuned package that it released in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. The company has said in the past that tuned profiles can boost performance in the double-digit percent range.

  • Viavi Solutions Inc. (VIAV) is at $11.84 per share and Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) is listed at $122.33
  • Fedora Magazine: 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for October 2018

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in the standard Fedora repositories. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the standard set of Fedora Fedora packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

  • Thunderbolt ports & bolt update

    Not every USB-C port is a Thunderbolt 3 port. Watch out for the logos!

    [...]

    In related news: bolt 0.5 is out (since about a month now) and will be shipped with Fedora 29. Have a look at the release notes for a complete list of changes, but the most important one I want to highlight here is the new force power D-Bus API. What is it and why do we need it? The Thunderbolt controller can be in two different modes: one in which it is constantly powered (native enumeration mode) and one in which it is controlled by the BIOS. In the latter mode, if nothing is plugged into the Thunderbolt port the controller is completely powered down and it looks as if there is no Thunderbolt hardware present at all. This is great because it saves battery, but there are two problems: 1) boltd wants to know what security level the Thunderbolt controller is in, and more importantly 2) the firmware update daemon (fwupd) wants to know the firmware version of the Thunderbolt controller, so that it can check if there are updates available (and if so, show them in GNOME Software). Luckily, newer kernel versions have (on supported platforms) a sysfs interface that can be used to "force-power" the Thunderbolt controller. Both boltd and fwupd have support for that, which is great, but also the root of a race: the force-power interface is not reference counted and also write only (you cannot ask for the current status). Now if boltd force-powers the controller, uevents will be generated which, in turn, will be processed by fwupd and it will try to read the firmware version. If, in the meantime, boltd is done with its thing and powers the controller down again but fwupd is not yet done reading the firmware, then that read will fail. Or the other way around: fwupd powers the controller, boltd gets started due to the uevents, but meanwhile fwupd is powering the controller down again, boltd might e.g. hang reading the boot-acl.

Red Hat Leftovers

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Fedora, Red Hat and Oracle Leftovers

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Fedora Toolbox ready for testing!

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Red Hat

As many of you know we kicked of a ambitious goal to revamp the Linux desktop when we launched Fedora Workstation 4 years. We wanted to remove many of the barriers to adoption of Linux as a desktop and make it a better operating system for all, especially for developers.

To that effect we have been pushing a long range of initiatives over the last 4 years ago, ranging from providing a better input stack through libinput, a better display system through Wayland, a better audio and video subsystem through PipeWire, a better way of doing application packaging and dependency handling through Flatpak, a better application installation history through GNOME Software, actual firmware handling for Linux through Linux Vendor Firmware Service, better manageability through Fleet Commander, and Project Silverblue for reliable OS updates. We also had a lot of efforts done to improve general hardware handling, be that work on glvnd and friends for dealing with NVidia driver, the Bolt project for handling Thunderbolt devices better, HiDPI support in the desktop, better touch support in the desktop, improved laptop battery life, and ongoing work to improve state of fingerprint readers under Linux and to provide a flicker free boot experience.

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat: Creativity is risky (and other truths open leaders need to hear)

    Leaders are all too aware of the importance of invention and innovation. Today, the health and wealth of their businesses have become increasingly dependent on the creation of new products and processes. In the digital age especially, competition is more fierce than ever as global markets open and expand. Just keeping pace with change requires a focus on constant improvement and consistent learning. And that says nothing about building for tomorrow.

  • APAC Financial Services Institutions Bank on Red Hat to Enhance Agility
  • APAC banks aim to use open source to enhance agility
  • Huawei CloudFabric Supports Container Network Deployment Automation, Improving Enterprise Service Agility

    At HUAWEI CONNECT 2018, Huawei announced that its CloudFabric Cloud Data Center Solution supports container network deployment automation and will be available for the industry-leading enterprise Kubernetes platform via a new plug-in.

  • Redis Labs Integrates With Red Hat OpenShift, Hits 1B Milestone

    Redis Labs is integrating its enterprise platform as a hosted and managed database service on Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform. That integration includes built-in support for Red Hat’s recently launched Kubernetes Operator.

    The Redis Enterprise integration will allow customers to deploy and manage Redis databases as a stateful Kubernetes service. It will also allow users to run Redis Enterprise on premises or across any cloud environment.

  • Needham & Company Starts Red Hat (RHT) at Buy
  • Fedora Toolbox — Hacking on Fedora Silverblue

    Fedora Silverblue is a modern and graphical operating system targetted at laptops, tablets and desktop computers. It is the next-generation Fedora Workstation that promises painless upgrades, clear separation between the OS and applications, and secure and cross-platform applications. The basic operating system is an immutable OSTree image, and all the applications are Flatpaks.

    It’s great!

    However, if you are a hacker and decide to set up a development environment, you immediately run into the immutable OS image and the absence of dnf. You can’t install your favourite tools, editors and SDKs the way you’d normally do on Fedora Workstation. You can either unlock your immutable OS image to install RPMs through rpm-ostree and give up the benefit of painless upgrades; or create a Docker container to get an RPM-based toolbox but be prepared to mess around with root permissions and having to figure out why your SSH agent or display server isn’t working.

  • Fedora 28 : Alien, Steam and Fedora distro.

Red Hat: OpenShift and Awards

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Red Hat
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift 3.11 Release Update with Scott McCarty (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Scott McCarty and numerous other members of the OpenShift Product Management team gave an in-depth look at Red Hat’s OpenShift’s latest release 3.11 and some insights in to the road ahead.

  • Awards roll call: Red Hat awards, June to October 2018

    Depending on the weather in your region, it’s safe to say that the seasons are changing so it’s a good time to look back at what was a busy few months for Red Hat, especially when it came to industry awards for our technical and product leadership. In recent months, Red Hat products and technologies took home twenty awards, highlighting the breadth and depth of our product portfolio as well as the expertise that we provide to our customers. In addition, Red Hat as a company won five awards recognizing its growth and culture as a leader in the industry.

  • More advice from a judge - what it takes to win a Red Hat Innovation Award

    Last year I penned the below post to provide insight into what the judges of the Red Hat Innovation Awards are looking for when reviewing submissions. Looking back, I would give almost the identical advice again this year...maybe with a few tweaks.

    With all the stellar nominations that we receive, the question I often get is, “how can we make our entry standout?” There’s no magic formula for winning the Red Hat Innovation Awards, but there are things that the other judges and I look for in the entries.

    Overall, we’re looking for the project that tells a compelling story. It’s not just about sharing what Red Hat products and services you used, we want to hear the full narrative. What challenges did you face; how you implemented the project; and ultimately, what was the true business impact and transformation that took place? Submissions that are able to showcase how open source culture and values were key to success, or how the project is making a difference in the lives of others, are the entries that most often rise to the top.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat underpins the growing importance of Linux and open source

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Linux
Red Hat
OSS

While you may not spend a lot of time thinking about this, the role Linux plays in the technology that we all use everyday is growing quite significantly. In an effort to more fully appreciate this, I had an opportunity to speak with the new vice resident and general manager of Red Hat's RHEL Business Unit — Dr. Stefanie Chiras — and ask about her vision for RHEL and Linux in general. She was very enthusiastic — not just for Red Hat, but for the open source movement overall and the rising importance of Linux.

Chiras started with Red Hat in July — not quite four months ago — and already describes herself as a “true Red Hatter.” She explained that she has had a serious focus on Linux for the last six years or more. As she points out, we all do development differently these days because of the open source movement. The changes in just the last five years have moved us to very different ways of doing things whether we're working on public or private clouds, containers, or bare metal.

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Red Hat Leftovers

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  • Red Hat Awards Crossvale Commercial Application Platform Partner of the Year.

    Crossvale was presented with the 2018 North America Commercial Application Platform Partner of the Year award by Red Hat. The announcement was made at the Red Hat North America Partner Conference held in Maryland on October 10th.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #52 – OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift Container Engine

    Last week Red Hat announced the general availability of OpenShift Container Platform 3.11. This is an important release because it incorporates the first wave of technology from the CoreOS acquisition. This includes new visibility for Operations teams through the Cluster Console and integrated Prometheus monitoring and Grafana dashboards. It also added support for a number of Operators, both from Red Hat and ISV partners (supporting the Operator Framework). This is important, as Operators will continue to play a more critical role in both the OpenShift platform, as well as for applications running on OpenShift. Finally, we discussed the recently released OpenShift Container Engine, and how it offers flexibility for customers that want Enterprise Kubernetes from OpenShift, but may want flexibility in certain areas of their deployments.

  • Knative: Building your Serverless Service

    In the Part-1 of Knative Serving blog series, you were introduced on how to build and deploy your first serverless service using Knative Serving. In this blog you will be introduced to another Knative component called Knative Build.

  • Agile Integration: Enterprise integration from a necessary evil to building competitive advantage

    Business success can be increasingly based on an organization’s ability to react to change. As new disruptive players enter markets and technology upends what consumers expect, organizations often need to change plans in shorter cycles. Modern software architectures and processes can help make organizations more effective at dealing with this change and emerge as leaders in their markets.

    "Planning as we know it is dead," was the keynote message delivered by Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat president and CEO, at the 2017 Red Hat Summit. "Planning harder in a less-known environment just isn’t the answer." In today’s world, the pace of innovation and disruption is accelerating in business. With that comes change, which can jar or break plans quickly and, in some instances, be extremely costly. Hence, the ability to react to change quickly can be a necessity. Enterprise integration can be at the heart of an organization's IT architecture. It may be necessary. But it is often a bottleneck.

  • Red Hat CEO Whitehurst sells $709000 in Hatter shares
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Variscite unveils its first i.MX8X module

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today's leftovers

  • freenode #live 2018 - Doc Searls and Simon Phipps - In Conversation
  • How to edit themes in Linux Mint Cinnamon - Tutorial
  • KDE Bugsquad – Okular Bug Day on November 17th, 2018
    Thank you to everyone who participated last Bug Day! We had a turnout of about six people, who worked through about half of the existing REPORTED (unconfirmed) Konsole bugs. Lots of good discussion occurred on #kde-bugs as well, thank you for joining the channel and being part of the team! We will be holding a Bug Day on November 17th, 2018, focusing on Okular. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!
  • Omarine 5.3 released! (Nov 14 2018)
    This release updates dbus and glib together with all dependencies and related packages. Some of them are rebuilt, the rest are upgraded. Glib 2.58.1 can be considered a development threshold because many dependent packages must be caught it up. Below is a list of some typically upgraded packages:
  • Achievement unlocked! I spoke at PythonBrasil[14]
    PythonBrasil is the national Python community conference that happens every year, usually in October, in Brazil. I attended PythonBrasil for the first time in 2016, the year we had started PyLadies Porto Alegre. Back then, we were a very small group and I was the only one to go. It was definitely one of the best experiences I ever had, which, of course, set a very high standard for every single tech event I attended afterwards. Because of the great time I had there, I wanted to bring more and more women from PyLadies Porto Alegre to experience PythonBrasil in the next editions. So, during the PyLadies Porto Alegre 1st birthday party, I encouraged the other women to submit activities to try and to go to the conference that would happen in Belo Horizonte.
  • Browser Based Open Source Image Optimization Tool Squoosh Comes To Google Lab’s Latest Release
    Open source, browser-based image optimization tool Squoosh is Google’s new Chrome Lab release. This new web tool is meant to make web developers work a lot simpler to optimize web pages. Images loading in a website is usually the reason for them to take so long to load and Squoosh helps web developers shrink the image so that it consumes lesser data. Squoosh can downsize, compress, and reformat images. Its purpose is to make web developers’ work less tedious and hence quicker. Google chrome labs made this tool available offline and said it would be handy to have this tool work offline. Squoosh also supports editing image codecs that are not normally available in the browser.
  • VS Code Live Share plugin [Ed: When GNU/Linux sites help Microsoft]
  • Microsoft Releases Open-Source HLSL to GLSL Shader Cross-Compiler [Ed: As above, except this is just openwashing of proprietary DX]
  • Upgrading OpenBSD 6.3 to 6.4 on Vultr
  • iGNUit has a new homepage address
  • gxmessage has a new homepage
  • It Looks Like The Raptor Blackbird Open-Source Motherboard Will Sell For Just Under $900
    Many have been curious to learn more about the Blackbird from Raptor Computing Systems as a lower-cost POWER9, open-source hardware alternative to their higher-end Talos II hardware that we've been recently benchmarking. The possible price has been revealed.  Overnight, Raptor Computing Systems tweeted a straw poll looking to gauge the interest level in "Would you pre-order a Raptor Computing Systems Blackbird system or board this year at a mainboard cost of $875?"
  • C++20 Making Progress On Modules, Memory Model Updates
    This past week was an ISO C++ committee meeting in San Diego, which happened to be their largest meeting ever, and they managed to accomplish a lot in drafting more planned changes around the C++20 language update.