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Red Hat

Red Hat's Business News

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Fedora/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat and Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • Maxta Introduces A Hyperconverged Red Hat Virtualization Offering

    On August 22nd, Maxta Inc announced a pre-configured system of Red Hat Virtualization software and Maxta Hyperconvergence software bundled together on Intel Data Center Blocks hardware. Maxta specializes in hyperconverged software like this and will be demoing it next week at VMworld, booth #1518.

  • Red Hat infrastructure migration solution for proprietary and siloed infrastructure

    Red Hat recently introduced its infrastructure migration solution to help provide an open pathway to digital transformation. Red Hat infrastructure migration solution provides an enterprise-ready pathway to cloud-native application development via Linux containers, Kubernetes, automation, and other open source technologies. It helps organizations to accelerate transformation by more safely migrating and managing workload to an open source infrastructure platform, thus reducing cost and speeding innovation.

  • OVS-DPDK: Migrating to vhostuser socket mode in Red Hat OpenStack

    In the Newton release, the default vhostuser mode in Open vSwitch (OvS) is dpdkvhostuser. In Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 GA, and subsequent updates till 29th June, the default vhostuser mode is dpdkvhostuser. With the latest update to OSP10 (post 29th June 2018), the default mode has been changed to dpdkvhostuserclient. This post provides the information on vhostuser migration and verifying the vhostuser modes of the VMs created with dpdkvhostuser mode.

    In order to understand the difference between the two modes and the advantage of moving to dpdkvhostuserclient mode, read the OvS documentation onvhostuser modes. In short, vhostuser allows Qemu to fetch/put network data to OvS-DPDK without overloading Qemu with the translation. And the vhostuser socket is a UNIX domain socket, created to establish the communication between Qemu and OvS-DPDK. This communication follows a specific messaging format detailed in theQemu's vhost user document.

  • 2018 C-Suite Award Winners (AH)
  • Flock 2018 Reflections

    Flock 2018 is going down in my books as another successful and wonderful Fedora conference! This year Flock to Fedora was held in Dresden, Germany, August 8-11th. I am so thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of this community for another year, and to have the chance to see the impact my contributions make. This year, I attended with the determination to interact more with different parts of the community outside of Fedora design. I made it my goal to liaise with people from other teams to hear their experiences, stories, and to learn how Fedora Badges could help improve each initiative and the project as a whole. Overall, I think I was successful in this venture and would like to share some of the experiences I had.

  • FPgM report: 2018-34

Red Hat and Fedora: Aim at VMware, Containers, Maxta, Flock 2018 and IBus 1.5.19

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Takes Virtualization Aim at VMware
  • Red Hat Takes Aim At VMware

    Red Hat thinks VMware is an anchor dragging enterprise IT departments down, and it's looking provide wings to help them soar. The ruby-lidded guys are launching infrastructure migration tools and professional services to migrate "legacy virtualization solutions" (Red Hat's euphemism for the V-team) to open source.

    In a blog post scheduled to go live Thursday, Red Hat Inc. (NYSE: RHT) takes aim at the financial cost of running these "legacy virtualization solutions," and promises to help enterprises "cut costs and speed innovation through cloud-native and container-based technologies." Red Hat says the cost of running legacy infrastructure starves enterprises of the resources needed for digital transformation. Red Hat is looking to fix that.

  • Red Hat Goals To Assist Firms Migrate To A Modern IT Infrastructure

    Business enterprises nowadays aren’t shy about their desire embrace “digital transformation,” and the companies that provide much of their information technology infrastructure are falling over themselves which is happening again and again.

  • How the Boston Children’s Hospital Is Innovating on Top of an Open Cloud

    Pienaar says that it’s very important that it is all open source and, again, not just because of the cost savings. Having been using Linux from the start of the project, he believes they wouldn’t have access to the different development environments and languages they’d want to use if they were tied to a proprietary cloud.

    “I very much am inspired by the idea that, with these open source approaches, we can build things that really affect data that has real connections to the world behind it,” Pienaar said.

    “Right now if we were trying to collaborate deep down into the Amazon cloud, I would imagine we would have to set up a licensing agreement with Amazon. I wouldn’t be able to download the Amazon Cloud to run up my own environment. And while the full power of ChRIS lies in its connection to the Mass Open Cloud, nothing stops you from downloading and running ChRIS right now on your laptop. The entire ChRIS is available. Your experience is identical — albeit your laptop might not quite muster the grade for heavy computing. Still, you can troubleshoot and develop to your own mini-but-complete ChRIS in totality and then with a click deploy to any number of other ‘ChRISes’ that live out on clouds.”

    [...]

    Both this use case and the medical ones follow an operational pattern of bringing in the data and code, running on the optimum numbers of data, and sharing the input data and the temporary data that are required for the application itself. ChRIS also has mechanisms that can facilitate visualizing the data for clinicians.

    The end goal is not to just make applications run faster on a single machine, but to open source data itself, while still remaining compliant to regulations like the U.S.’s HIPAA and Europe’s GDPR.

  • [PodCTL] PodCTL #46 – KubeVirt and Container Native Virtualization

    Does it feel like sometimes the new Kubernetes updates are only targeted at new, cloud-native applications? What about all those existing applications that aren’t microservices or are running in virtual machines today? Today’s show looks at the intersection of container, virtual machines and Kubernetes. We talk about the KubeVirt project and the work that Red Hat is doing with Container Native Virtualization. It’s a great look at how new Kubernetes capabilities like Customer Resource Definitions (CRDs) are allowing Kubernetes to expand it’s capabilities without making the core project less stable.

  • Eclipse MicroProfile and Red Hat Update: Thorntail and SmallRye

    With the name, we also changed versioning to come back to a more semantic version numbering. Thus the last release version of WildFly Swarm was 2018.5.0 and the first version of Thorntail (same code, different name) was 2.0.0.Final.

    Changing the version numbering makes it easier for us to communicate about new features and have better links to downstream project versions.

    You’ll find more information on the project renaming and versioning changes in this interview that Bob McWhirter gave to InfoQ.

  • Can I catch up with Linux containers?

    Cloud, Linux containers, and container orchestration (in the form of Kubernetes) are the topics I hear being discussed the most today. Most IT organizations are discussing DevOps and microservices. The will to deep dive into that pool of fresh new experiences is leading many organizations to rethink tooling, culture, and processes in-house. Businesses want all the benefits of this digital transformation, but are you really prepared for this new paradigm? Are you really ready for containers?

    In order to standardize environments, isolate processes or increase modularity, to be able to better produce code, services and provide maintenance, the solution that comes in handy is containers. A smaller footprint which is standardized and isolated while consuming the resources of the host was the perfect recipe. Click here to understand what containers are.

  • Transitioning the Red Hat container registry

    Red Hat has seen significant adoption of our container ecosystem since we began shipping Red Hat Enterprise Linux with support for Linux containers more than four years ago. To support our existing users and users to come, we will be transitioning our product portfolio and customers to a new container registry for Red Hat container images available at registry.redhat.io over the next year. We have several reasons to make this change, and we’re also taking a number of steps to make the move away from registry.access.redhat.com as minimally disruptive as possible.

  • Maxta Launches Hyperconverged (Un)Appliance for Red Hat Virtualization Pre-Configured on Intel® Data Center Blocks
  • Introducing Red Hat infrastructure migration solution: An enterprise-grade remedy designed for proprietary virtualization silo ills

    For many organizations, legacy virtualization solutions can stifle innovation and IT advancement, which can limit the path to hybrid cloud infrastructure, where workloads and resources span physical, virtual and cloud-based environments. The cost of maintaining these existing infrastructure investments can tie up a significant portion of IT budgets. Compounding this, Gartner states, “IT organizations with goals for "doing more with less" find it difficult to quantify, estimate and communicate the level of non-discretionary IT spending needed to sustain business transformation.” With the budget remaining, an organization can be forced to put digital transformation, the modernization of IT environments through digital technologies, on hold.

  • FORM 4
  • Flock 2018

    A couple weeks ago I had the pleasure of traveling to Dresden, Germany to attend Flock, the annual gathering of Fedora contributors. This was my third Flock and it was fun and quite productive.

    One of the things I enjoyed about this year's schedule was the built-in coffee breaks. Most conferences pack the schedule completely full with many simultaneous tracks, so that attending the "hallway track" means that you are missing talks. The built-in coffee breaks were such that there were no other scheduled activities, which was great for having sanctioned hallway track time. It was a great idea and I hope it is also incorporated into next year's event.

  • IBus 1.5.19 is released

    IBus 1.5.19 is now released and it’s available in Fedora 29.

  • [ES] Docker Meetup 05 Panamá [Docker+Fedora]

Richard Hughes and His Work on Firmware Blobs (LVFS)

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Red Hat
GNOME
  • Fun with SuperIO

    While I’m waiting back for NVMe vendors (already one tentatively onboard!) I’ve started looking at “embedded controller” devices. The EC on your laptop historically used to just control the PS/2 keyboard and mouse, but now does fan control, power management, UARTs, GPIOs, LEDs, SMBUS, and various tasks the main CPU is too important to care about. Vendors issue firmware updates for this kind of device, but normally wrap up the EC update as part of the “BIOS” update as the system firmware and EC work together using various ACPI methods. Some vendors do the EC update out-of-band and so we need to teach fwupd about how to query the EC to get the model and version on that specific hardware. The Linux laptop vendor Tuxedo wants to update the EC and system firmware separately using the LVFS, and helpfully loaned me an InfinityBook Pro 13 that was immediately disassembled and connected to all kinds of exotic external programmers. On first impressions the N131WU seems quick, stable and really well designed internally — I’m sure would get a 10/10 for repairability.

  • Please welcome AKiTiO to the LVFS

    Over the last few weeks AKiTiO added support for the Node and Node Lite devices, and I’m sure they’ll be more in the future. It’s been a pleasure working with the engineers and getting them up to speed with uploading to the LVFS.

    In other news, Lenovo also added support for the ThinkPad T460 on the LVFS, so get any updates while they’re hot. If you want to try this you’ll have to enable the lvfs-testing remote either using fwupdmgr enable-remote lvfs-testing or using the sources dialog in recent versions of GNOME Software. More Lenovo updates coming soon, and hopefully even more vendor announcements too.

New Videos & New Opportunities

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GNOME

Flatpak 1.0 has released which is a great milestone for the Linux Desktop. I was asked at GUADEC whether a release video could be in place. In response, I spontaneously arranged to produce a voice-over with Sam during the GUADEC Video Editing BoF. Since then, I have been storyboarding, animating and editing the project in Blender. The music and soundscape has been produced by Simon-Claudius who has done an amazing job. Britt edited the voice-over and has lended me a great load of rendering power (thanks Britt!).

Read more

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 Beta now available

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Red Hat

The hybrid cloud requires a consistent foundation and today, we are pleased to refine and innovate that foundation with the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 beta. The latest update to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is designed to deliver control, confidence, and freedom to demanding business environments, keeping pace with cloud-native innovation while supporting new and existing production operations across the many footprints of enterprise IT.

As Red Hat’s Paul Cormier states, the hybrid cloud is becoming a default technology choice. Enterprises want the best answers to meet their specific needs, regardless of whether that’s through the public cloud or on bare metal in their own datacenter. Red Hat Enterprise Linux provides an answer to a wide variety of IT challenges, providing a stable, enterprise-grade backbone across all of IT’s footprints - physical, virtual, private cloud, and public cloud. As the future of IT turns towards workloads running across heterogeneous environments, Red Hat Enterprise Linux has focused on evolving to meet these changing needs.

Read more

Also: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 beta is out now

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.6 Beta Updates Cockpit, Adds Podman

Fedora News and Red Hat's Finances

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Kubernetes on Metal with OpenShift

    My first concert was in the mid-80s, when AC/DC came to the Providence Civic Center in Rhode Island, and it was glorious. Music fans who grew up in the 80s will fondly remember the birth of MTV, the emergence of the King of Pop and the heyday of rock-n-roll’s heavy metal gone mainstream era, when long hair and guitar riffs both flowed freely. So recently when Def Leppard joined Journey at Fenway Park in Boston for their 2018 joint tour, I knew I had to be there.

    Metal also dominated the datacenter in the 80s and 90s, as mainframes and minicomputers made way for bare-metal servers running enterprise applications on UNIX and, soon after, open source Linux operating systems powered by Red Hat. Just like heavy metal eventually made way for the angst-filled grunge rock era of the 90s, so too did application provisioning on bare metal make way for the era of virtualization driven by VMWare – with subsequent VM sprawl and costly ELAs creating much angst to this day for many IT organizations.

  • Security Technologies: Stack Smashing Protection (StackGuard)

    In our previous blog, we saw how arbitrary code execution resulting from stack-buffer overflows can be partly mitigated by marking segments of memory as non-executable, a technology known as Execshield. However stack-buffer overflow exploits can still effectively overwrite the function return address, which leads to several interesting exploitation techniques like ret2libc, ret2gets, and ret2plt. With all of these methods, the function return address is overwritten and attacker controlled code is executed when the program control transfers to overwritten address on the stack.

  • Keeping both of your OpenShift Container Platforms Highly Available with Keepalived and HAproxy

    Until Kubernetes Federation hits the prime time, a number of solutions have sprung up as stop gaps to address geographically dispersing multiple cluster endpoints: stretch clusters and multiple clusters across multiple datacenters. The following article discusses how to configure Keepalived for maximum uptime of HAproxy with multiple cluster endpoints. In the following documentation an HAproxy and Keepalived configuration will be discussed in detail to load balance to the cluster(s) endpoints.

    In a production environment a Global server load balancing (GSLB) or Global Traffic Manager (GTM) would be used to give a differing IP address based on the originating location of the request. This would help to ensure traffic from Virginia or New York would get the closest location to the originating request.

  • How to integrate A-MQ 6.3 on Red Hat JBoss EAP 7
  • The Open Brand Project | The helpful guy in the red hat.

    A big part of the Red Hat Open Brand Project has been looking back at our past and examining our roots. It is important that we imbue the new symbol with as much shared meaning from our history and culture as possible. To represent ourselves, we have to understand our origins.

    Before there was Shadowman, before there was a red fedora, before we were an enterprise technology company, and before we helped make open source a driving force of technology innovation, we had our name.

  • October 19th Options Now Available For Red Hat (RHT)
  • Decentralize common Fedora apps with Cjdns

    Are you worried about a few huge corporations controlling the web? Don’t like censorship on centralized social media sites like facebook and twitter? You need to decentralize! The internet was designed to be decentralized. Many common activities, from social media to email to voice calls, don’t actually require a centralized service.

    The basic requirement for any peer to peer application is that the peers be able to reach each other. This is impossible today for most people using IP4 behind NAT (as with most household routers). The IP4 address space was exhausted over a decade ago. Most people are in “IP4 NAT Jail.”

    Your device is assigned a private IP, and translated to the public IP by the router. Without port forwarding to a specific private IP, incoming TCP connections or UDP sessions can’t tell where to forward to, and are dropped. As a result, nothing can connect to your device. You must connect to various public servers to do anything. IP4 NAT Jail forces centralization.

Release 1.0.0 of Flatpak

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Red Hat
Software
  • Release 1.0.0

    Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This
    new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first
    introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version,
    and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible.

    The following release notes describe the major changes since
    0.10.0. For a complete overview of Flatpak, please see
    docs.flatpak.org.

  • Linux Application Sandboxing And Distribution Framework Flatpak Reaches Version 1.0 Stable

    Flatpak, the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, has reached version 1.0 stable. Compared to the previous stable series (0.10.x), the new version should have faster installation and updates, it allows marking applications as end-of-life, and it asks the user to confirm app permissions at install time, among other improvements.

    Flatpak is a software utility for software deployment, package management, and application virtualization for Linux. Applications built with Flatpak can run on almost any Linux distribution. Flatpak applications run in a sandbox environment in which the applications are isolated from the rest of the system, and require permission from the user to access the user's files or access hardware devices.

  • Flatpak Linux App Sandboxing Hits 1.0 Milestone After Three Years in Development

    The Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, formerly XDG-App, used for building and distributing conternized apps on Linux desktops, has hit today the 1.0 milestone.

    After being in development for more than three years, the widely-used Flatpak Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework has finally reached the 1.0 version, which means that it's mature enough to be deployed and used in production environments for distributing and running Linux apps.

    "Flatpak 1.0 is the first version in a new stable release series. This new 1.x series is the successor to the 0.10.x series, which was first introduced in October 2017. 1.0 is the new standard Flatpak version, and distributions are recommended to update to it as soon as possible," said developer Alexander Larsson.

  • Flatpak 1.0 Released For Delivering The Best Linux App Sandboxing
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More in Tux Machines

EEE, Entryism and Openwashing

  • New Linux distro specifically designed for Windows comes to the Microsoft Store [Ed: WLinux or Whitewater Foundry not the first time people exploit Microsoft to put a price tag on FOSS such as LibreOffice. Microsoft is doing a fine job sabotaging the GNU/Linux 'ecosystem'.]
    WLinux is based on Debian, and the developer, Whitewater Foundry, claims their custom distro will also allow faster patching of security and compatibility issues that appear from time to time between upstream distros and WSL. [...] In return for saving developers time Whitewater Foundry is charging $19.99 (though the app is currently 50% off and the distribution can be downloaded from Github for free).
  • Open source dev gets Win32 apps running on Xbox One [Ed: Running blobs on two DRM platforms does not make you "Open source dev"]
  • Building Blocks of Secure Development: How to Make Open Source Work for You [Ed: Veracode self-promotion in "webinar" form, badmouthing FOSS to push their proprietary things. They work with Microsoft.]
  • SD Times open source project of the week: TonY [Ed: Openwashing of a surveillance operation at Microsoft]
    Unsatisfied with the available solutions for connecting the analytics-generating power of their TensorFlow machine learning implementations with the scalable data computation and storage capabilities of their Apache Hadoop clusters, developers at LinkedIn decided that they’d take matters into their own hands with the development of this week’s highlighted project, TonY.
  • Open Source: Automating Release Notes in Github [Ed: The New York Times is still propping up Microsoft hosting]
  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture [Ed: Calling furniture "open"]
    Opendesk customers can now use augmented reality to see how the furniture brand's pieces look in their homes before ordering them from local makers. The augmented-reality (AR) experience launched with the arrival of Apple's iOS 12 operating system this week. It enables customers to use their smartphones to view some of Opendesk's furniture superimposed on the room in front of them.
  • Open Source Testing Startup Cypress Leaves Beta With Thousands of Users, Launches Paid Plans [Ed: This is not Open Source; they misuse the label and even put dashes ("open-source") because they know they're faking it.]
    Cypress.io‘s CEO Drew Lanham explains that the startup’s tool is software created by developers, for developers. The company was founded in 2014 by technologist Brian Mann, after observing that while computing and application development had changed drastically over the past decade, software testing had not. Large companies now release thousands of software updates a year, often on a daily basis across their organization. Technology teams aim to move rapidly, iterating on an agile basis and working in parallel so they can sync their code together even faster. But, as Lanham explains, the testing software out there was far outdated for these agile processes.
  • Kindred Introduces SenseAct, the First Reinforcement Learning Open-Source Toolkit for Physical Robots [Ed: Kindred or SenseAct not actually FOSS; but they sure try to make it seem that way, by focusing on a toolkit.]

Top Linux Distros for Software Developers

A major factor in the choice of Linux distro is your personal preference. You may try one of the most popular Linux distros but find that you prefer one that’s less often used. Your experience with Linux will also factor into which distro is suited to you. With the benefits Linux can offer — including flexibility, stability, and support — it’s worth evaluating your options. Read more

Source Code From Deutsche Telekom

  • Edge compute platform is open source
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have partnered for the creation of an Open Source, low latency Edge compute platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster.
  • Deutsche Telekom and Aricent Create Open Source Edge Software Framework
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent today announced the creation of an Open Source, Low Latency Edge Compute Platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster. The cost-effective Edge platform is built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and is decentralized, to accelerate the deployment of ultra-low latency applications. The joint solution will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • DT and Aricent announce telco Open Source Edge framework for 5G
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have announced the creation of an Open Source Edge software framework, designed especially for developers, platform-as-a-service and cloud-native multi-access edge computing technologies and on-track to intersect with the deployment of 5G enabled network edge facilities to tackle ultra-low latency network applications. The Edge platform has been built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent brew up edge compute platform for 5G apps and services
    In order to speed up the rollout of 5G applications and services, Duetsche Telekom and Aricent have teamed up to build an edge compute platform. The open source, edge software framework was built for use in software-defined data centers in decentralized locations. It also uses cloud-native multiaccess edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent Bridge Cloud Native, Telco MEC Gap
    German telecom giant Deutsche Telekom and Aricent threw their collective weight behind an open source edge computing platform targeted at software-defined data centers (SDDC). The initiative gamely joins a growing list of open source multi-access edge computing (MEC) initiatives. The DT-Aricent collaboration is at its core a decentralized platform designed to help telecom operators develop and launch low-latency 5G mobile applications and services. It includes a software framework with features delivered through a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) model.

Android Leftovers