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Red Hat

Red Hat plans unified security management for Fedora 21

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Red Hat

Profiles would cover things like TLS/SSL and DTLS versioning, ciphersuite selection and ordering, certificate and key exchange parameters including minimum key length, acceptable elliptic curve (ECDH or ECDSA for example), signature hash functions, and TLS options like safe renegotiation.

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Red Hat's Stubbornness Will Keep OpenShift Alive

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Red Hat

Insiders have publicly bet against Red Hat's platform-as-a-service, but I say it will stand by OpenShift without regret.

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Red Hat's Fedora 21 brimming with security, crypto upgrades

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Fedora 21, the next version of Red Hat's Fedora distribution of Linux, just received a slew of new feature approvals courtesy of the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee.

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Red Hat kicks out sponsor, then relents

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Red Hat

Matthew Garrett, a former Red Hat employee who has gained something of a public profile, suggested that Piston had got itself into Red Hat's bad books by competing against it for a contract - and winning.

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Red Hat fast-tracks Docker apps for Enterprise Linux

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Red Hat's application certification program is nominally about ensuring that third-party applications and app platforms run reliably on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

The newest candidate for certification, though, isn't an application per se. Rather, it's an application technology that stormed the Linux world and quickly became a major part of its landscape: containerization, which allows apps to be packaged to run almost anywhere with minimal muss or fuss.

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Ojuba

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

So Ojuba project manage many projects that make changes, Ojuba contribute in Fedora iself and in many big open source projects as KDE,MATE,VLC,Wine and others.

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Makulu, Ubuntu, and Red Hat

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Red Hat
Ubuntu

Today's perusal of the headlines revealed a review of MakuluLinux 5, a Debian derivative with unusual default software. In addition, Matt Hartley asks if animosity towards Ubuntu is misplaced and recounts recent controversies. Finally today, another interview with Red Hat CEO and a review of Red Hat clone ClearOS are covered.

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Red Hat Risk Reflex (The Linux Security Flaw That Isn't)

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Red Hat
Security

News headlines screaming that yet another Microsoft Windows vulnerability has been discovered, is in the wild or has just been patched are two a penny. Such has it ever been. News headlines declaring that a 'major security problem' has been found with Linux are a different kettle of fish. So when reports of an attack that could circumvent verification of X.509 security certificates, and by so doing bypass both secure sockets layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) website protection, people sat up and took notice. Warnings have appeared that recount how the vulnerability can impact upon Debian, Red Hat and Ubuntu distributions. Red Hat itself issued an advisory warning that "GnuTLS did not correctly handle certain errors that could occur during the verification of an X.509 certificate, causing it to incorrectly report a successful verification... An attacker could use this flaw to create a specially crafted certificate that could be accepted by GnuTLS as valid." In all, at least 200 operating systems actually use GnuTLS when it comes to implementing SSL and TLS and the knock-on effect could mean that web applications and email alike are vulnerable to attack. And it's all Linux's fault. Or is it?

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Fedora 21 Being Planned For Mid-October Release

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Red Hat

The next Fedora Linux release is being postponed until October since if shipping in August they are left midway between GNOME 3.12 and 3.14. GNOME 3.14 will be released by late September and thus if shipping in mid-to-late October would allow time for a fresh GNOME 3.14 desktop to be incorporated into the release. October/November release targets have also been what's long been sought after by Fedora (among other distributions) for nailing close to the GNOME release time-frame and other software projects.

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Yes there was a security hole in Linux, but Red Hat already fixed it

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Security

Originally reported by Ars Technica, the fix was available by the time the general public was made aware of it. It’s actually fairly similar to a certain security hole that lived for a year and could have allowed for exploits to be used in the wild.

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Tails 3.11 and Tor Transparency (Financials)

The Year 2018 in Open Hardware and MIT's 3D Printer

  • The Year 2018 in Open Hardware
    2018 saw several open hardware projects reach fruition. Where the open hardware movement goes from here, remains to be seen. 2018 was not “The Year of Open Hardware,” any more than it was the fabled “Year of the Linux Desktop.” All the same, 2018 was a year in which open hardware projects started to move from fundraising and project development to product releases. Many of these open products were traditional hardware, but 2018 also saw the release of innovative tech in the form of new and useful gadgets. In the background, open hardware hangs on to traditional niches. These niches occur at the intersection of altruism, hobbyists, academia, and the market, to say nothing of crowdfunding and the relative affordability of 3D printing. A prime example of this intersection is the development of prosthetics. Much of the modern work in open hardware began almost a decade ago with the Yale OpenHand project. At the same time, sites like Hackaday.io offer kits and specifications for hobbyists, while the e-NABLE site has become a place for exchanging ideas for everyone from tinkerers to working professionals in the field. As a result, open hardware technology in the field of prosthetics has grown to rival traditional manufacturers in a handful of years. This niche is a natural one for open hardware not only because of the freely available resources, but for simple economics. Traditionally manufactured prosthetic hands begin at about $30,000, far beyond the budgets of many potential customers. By contrast, an open hardware-based company like the UK based Open Bionics can design a cosmetically-pleasing hand for $200, which is still a large sum in impoverished areas, but far more obtainable. A non-profit called Social Hardware estimates that a need for prosthetic hands in India alone numbers 26,000 and hopes to help meet the demand by offering a development kit on which enthusiasts can learn and later donate their results to those who need them.
  • This MIT Developed 3D Printer Is 10 Times Faster Than Modern 3D Printers
    3D printers have become more and more useful in the mass production of complex products that are cheaper and stronger. However, the only issue with 3D printing is its slow speed. These desktop 3D printers can print only one product at a time and only one thin layer at a making.
  • Accelerating 3-D printing
    Imagine a world in which objects could be fabricated in minutes and customized to the task at hand. An inventor with an idea for a new product could develop a prototype for testing while on a coffee break. A company could mass-produce parts and products, even complex ones, without being tied down to part-specific tooling and machines that can’t be moved. A surgeon could get a bespoke replacement knee for a patient without leaving the operating theater. And a repair person could identify a faulty part and fabricate a new one on site — no need to go to a warehouse to get something out of inventory.

FreeBSD 12.0, FreeNAS 11.2 and DNSSEC enabled in default unbound(8) configuration

Programming: Linux Direct Rendering Manger Subsystem, Python, QtCreator CMake, Rust and More

  • The Linux Direct Rendering Manger Subsystem Poised To Have A Second Maintainer
    For hopefully helping out with code reviews and getting code staged in a timely manner before being upstreamed to the mainline Linux kernel, Daniel Vetter of the Intel Open-Source Technology Center is set to become a co-maintainer.  Daniel Vetter who has been with Intel OTC for a number of years working on their Linux graphics driver has proposed becoming a DRM co-maintainer, "MAINTAINERS: Daniel for drm co-maintainer...lkml and Linus gained a CoC, and it's serious this time. Which means my [number one] reason for declining to officially step up as drm maintainer is gone, and I didn't find any new good excuse."
  • Discovering the pathlib module
    The Python Standard Library is like a gold mine, and the pathlib module is really a gem.
  • QtCreator CMake for Android plugin
    It’s about QtCreator CMake for Android! I know it’s a strange coincidence between this article and The Qt Company’s decision to ditch QBS and use CMake for Qt 6, but I swear I started to work on this project *before* they announced it ! This plugin enables painless experience when you want to create Android apps using Qt, CMake and QtCreator. It’s almost as easy as Android Qmake QtCreator plugin! The user will build, run & debug Qt on Android Apps as easy as it does with Qmake.
  • Testing Your Code with Python's pytest, Part II
  • Top Tips For Aspiring Web Developers
    As we’re a portal geared towards open-source development, we’re naturally going to bang the drum about the benefits of getting involved in open-source projects. There are so many fantastic open-source projects that are still going strong today – WordPress, Android and even Ubuntu/Linux to name but a few. Open source projects will give you direct hands-on experience, allowing you to build your own portfolio of work and network with other like-minded developers too.
  • Announcing Rust 1.31 and Rust 2018
    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.31.0, and "Rust 2018" as well. Rust is a programming language that empowers everyone to build reliable and efficient software.
  • A call for Rust 2019 Roadmap blog posts
    It's almost 2019! As such, the Rust team needs to create a roadmap for Rust's development next year.
  • Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x
    Our connected world is full of events that are triggered or received by different software services. One of the big issues is that event publishers tend to describe events differently and in ways that are mostly incompatible with each other. To address this, the Serverless Working Group from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently announced version 0.2 of the CloudEvents specification. The specification aims to describe event data in a common, standardized way. To some degree, a CloudEvent is an abstract envelope with some specified attributes that describe a concrete event and its data.