Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat

How Red Hat can catch the developer train

Filed under
Red Hat

Outside the operating system, according to AngelList data compiled by Leo Polovets, these developers go with MySQL, MongoDB, or PostgreSQL for their database; Chef or Puppet for configuration; and ElasticSearch or Solr for search. None of this technology is developed by Red Hat.

Yet all of this technology is what the next generation of developers is using to build modern applications.

Given that developers are the new kingmakers, Red Hat needs to get out in front of the developer freight train if it wants to remain relevant for the next 20 years, much less the next two.

Read more

Red Hat launches Asia Pacific Forum to answer open source questions

Filed under
Red Hat

Open source solutions provider, Red Hat, will be hosting its annual Asia Pacific forums to address pain-points and share strategies with public sector agencies and businesses interested in open source.

Read more

More: Red Hat Enhances its Linux OpenStack Platform

Red Hat bids to become a hybrid cloud power

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

Make no mistake about it, Red Hat is a Linux power that wants to be a force in the clouds as well. The announcement that Red Hat CloudForms 3.1, its open hybrid cloud management solution, will be available in September 2014 on the opening day of VMworld underlines its cloud intentions.

Read more

Linux Supplier Red Hat Is Set for Strong Gains

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

The organization's performance shows that it is getting a great deal of footing in its center Linux business. Truth be told, its first-quarter results have given a fitting answer to critics who were of the notion that Red Hat's Linux business was slowing down because of business saturation. To sustain its force, Red Hat has now entered into a consent to get enovance.

Furthermore, Red Hat is seeing strong interest for its Linux, middleware, and cloud offerings. Actually, it arrived some record breaking deals amid the quarter, inking four deals that were over $5 million and one arrangement that was more than $10 million. It also observed strong a reestablishment rates. Red Hat could replenish each of the 25 deals that were up for restoration at the end of the last quarter.

Read more

Red Hat: ARM servers will come when people crank out chips like AMD's 64-bit Seattle

Filed under
Red Hat

It's practically a given that the ARM processor architecture – so beloved by makers of small devices everywhere – will graduate to servers soon. But before ARM servers can ship in any significant volume, a standardized hardware platform that specifically targets the data center is a must.

So sayeth Jon Masters, chief ARM architect for enterprise Linux giant Red Hat, who addressed the topic during a session at the LinuxCon 2014 conference in Chicago on Thursday.

Read more

Synonym of Fedora QA – Adam Williamson

Filed under
Red Hat
Interviews

A very famous name in Fedora QA “Adam Williamson“, we all know him
more as “Community Monkey”.
I was already quite impressed the amount of work he has been putting in Fedora QA since quite a long time and I am sure it is not just me. I got a golden opportunity to meet him in person at flock and it was really nice to know about him more as a person.

My first meeting with him was a big surprise for me. I was about to start my talk on Fedora QA and with in five minutes after I started giving talk, just a another boy with shorts came running with a big smile on his face in to my talk room and I actually stopped my talk to mention that people are so happy to get registered in the flock. But,he was smiling all the time as I was giving my talk (may be because, there were lot many things I included in my slides created/managed/initiated by Adam). I was quite confused what making this guy so happy. At the end of my talk he was helping me out in giving answers quite confidently. I was wondering who is this guy, then I read his name on his flock badge – I was almost dead with shock because it was none other than “Adam Williamson”

Read more

Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20

Filed under
Development
Red Hat
Software

If you are a Fedora Eclipse user, then you're probably saddened since the release of Eclipse Luna (4.4) because you are still using Eclipse Kepler (4.3) on Fedora 20.

Well, be saddened no longer because Eclipse Luna is now available for Fedora 20 as a software collection!

A software collection is simply a set of RPMs whose contents are isolated from the rest of your system such that they do not modify, overwrite or otherwise conflict with anything in the main Fedora repositories. This allows you install multiple versions of a software stack side-by-side, without them interfering with one another. More can be read about this mechanism on the software collections website.

The Eclipse Luna software collection lives in a separate yum repository, which must be configured by clicking on this link to install the release package.

Read more

Another great experience in Fedora bug reporting: Wine font fix solves my web-browsing problem

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora‘s motto is “Freedom. Friends. Features. First.” I’m here to tell you Fedora lives up to that billing. Why do I say this now? I’ve just had another positive experience with Fedora, this time in finding a bug in my system, adding my information to an existing bug report and now seeing updated packages pushed to the Fedora 20 stable repositories and onto my system, where the problem has been fixed.

Read more

LinuxCon: What's Going On With Fedora.Next

Filed under
Red Hat

For those curious about what's going on with "Fedora.Next" in revolutionizing the Fedora Linux distribution, Matthew Miller -- Fedora's new Project Leader -- is presenting at LinuxCon Chicago today covering the ongoing working for the Red Hat sponsored distribution.

Matthew Miller's presentation is entitled "How Linux Distros Became Boring (and Fedora's Plan to Put Boring Where It Belongs)." It doesn't look like I'll make it over to LinuxCon Chicago due to the weather over here in Indiana today, but fortunately for all those outside of Chicago, you can already find Matthew's slides online.

Read more

The Many Things You Can Build With A Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Hardware

Ruth Suehle and Tom Callaway are presenting at LinuxCon 2014 Chicago tomorrow about many different Raspberry Pi hacks and other Linux capabilities of these low-cost, low-performance single board computers.

The two Fedora contributors cover the back-story of the Raspberry Pi for anyone that's been sleeping under a rock, how to go about getting parts for the RPi, and the process to get Linux running on the ~$35 ARMv6 system. With Linux running on the Raspberry Pi, the possibilities are nearly endless for this low-cost development-friendly board.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Intel, XWayland and Vulkan

  • Intel Linux Graphics Driver Adding Support For The Mule Creek Canyon PCH
    Mule Creek Canyon is the PCH to be paired with Intel Elkhart Lake processors. Elkhart Lake as a reminder is the Gemini Lake SoC successor that will feature Gen11 class graphics and now thanks to the open-source Intel Linux graphics driver we know that new PCH is the Mule Creek Canyon. Mule Creek Canyon doesn't appear to be widely publicized up to this point but appeared in today's latest open-source development activity. Mule Creek Canyon is the new PCH for Elkhart Lake and required some minor changes around Port-C remapping that differ from other Icelake graphics hardware.
  • XWayland Receive An EGL-Based GLX Provider, Helping Various Games On Linux
    A notable improvement was merged into the "xserver" Git tree for the eventual X.Org Server 1.21 release that will improve the support for various Linux games relying on XWayland for running under a Wayland compositor.
  • Vulkan 1.1.109 Released With Two New Intel Extensions
    Vulkan 1.1.109 was released today as the latest update to this graphics/compute specification ahead of the US holiday weekend. With two weeks having passed since Vulkan 1.1.108 there are a few different documentation corrections/clarifications. There are also two new vendor extensions contributed by Intel.

Rob Szumski’s Keynote and Abby Kearns Interview at CloudNativeCon & KubeCon

GNOME: Theming, Mutter and Sprint 1

  • App Devs Ask Linux Distros to “Stop Theming Our Apps”
    A group of independent Linux app developers have written an open letter to ask wider GNOME community to ask: “stop theming our apps”. The letter is addressed to the maintainers of Linux distributions who elect to ship custom GTK and icons themes by default in lieu of upstream defaults. By publicising the issues they feel stem from the practice of “theming” it’s hoped that distros and developers might work together to create a “healthier GNOME third party app ecosystem”.
  • A Group of Independent Linux App Developers Has Asked Wider GNOME Community To 'Stop Theming' Its Apps
  • GNOME's Mutter Makes Another Step Towards X11-Less, Starting XWayland On-Demand
    GNOME 3.34 feature development continues at full-speed with a lot of interesting activity this cycle particularly on the Mutter front. On top of the performance/lag/stuttering improvements, today Mutter saw the merging of the "X11 excision" preparation patches. The Mutter patches by longtime GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho around preparing for X11 excision were merged minutes ago.
  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: New Background panel, Calendar search engine, GTK4 shortcut engine (Sprint 1)
    GNOME To Do is full GTK4 these days. Which means it’s both a testbed for new GTK4 features, and also a way to give feedback as an app developer for the GTK team. Unfortunately, it also means To Do is blocked on various areas where GTK4 is lacking. One of these areas is keyboard shortcut. Last year, Benjamin wrote a major revamp for keyboard shortcuts. As part of this cycle, I decided to rebase and finish it; and also make To Do use the new API. Unfortunately, I failed to achieve what I set myself to. Turns out, adding a shortcuts engine to GTK4 is more involving and requires way more context than I had when trying to get it up to speed. I failed to predict that one week would have not been enough to finish it all. However, that does not mean all the efforts were wasted! The rebasing of the shortcuts engine was a non-trivial task successfully completed (see gtk!842), and I also fixed a few bugs while working on it. I also got a working prototype of GNOME To Do with the new APIs, and confirmed that it’s well suited — at least for a simpler application such as To Do. In retrospect, I believe I should have been more realistic (and perhaps slightly pessimistic) about the length and requirements of this task.

Programming: SVE2, Graphical Interface, Guile, Python and More

  • Arm SVE2 Support Aligning For GCC 10, LLVM Clang 9.0
    Given the significant performance benefits to Arm's Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2), they are working on ensuring the open-source Linux compiler toolchains support these new CPU instructions ahead of SoCs shipping that support this big addition. Arm announced Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2) recently as their latest advancement around SIMD programming and increasing data-level parallelism in programs. SVE2 is designed to ultimately deliver better SIMD performance than their long-available Neon extensions and to scale the performance with vector length increases as well as enabling auto-vectorization techniques. More details in this post on SVE2.
  • Intake: Discovering and Exploring Data in a Graphical Interface
    Do you have data that you’d like people to be able to explore on their own? Are you always passing around snippets of code to load specific data files? These are problems that people encounter all the time when working in groups and using the same datasources or when trying to distribute data to the public. Some users are comfortable interacting with data entirely programatically, but often it is helpful to use a GUI (Graphical User Interface) instead. With that in mind we have reimplemented the Intake GUI so that in addition to working in a jupyter notebook, it can be served as a web application next to your data, or at any endpoint.
  • lightening run-time code generation
    The upcoming Guile 3 release will have just-in-time native code generation. Finally, amirite? There's lots that I'd like to share about that and I need to start somewhere, so this article is about one piece of it: Lightening, a library to generate machine code.
  • Python Language Creator: “Male Attitude” Is Hurting The Programming Space
    Guido van Rossum is a famous name in the programming world. He is the creator of the Python programming language which was developed back in 1989. It is only since the last few years when this general-purpose programming language started gaining popularity. The number of Python users has increased significantly and it was not only named as the best programming language by IEEE but also the most asked-about language on Stack Overflow, overthrowing JavaScript — the all-time winner for decades.
  • Avant-IDLE: an experiment