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Red Hat

Breaking down the Red Hat QA process

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Red Hat

Quality assurance (QA) is a critical aspect of software development, and Red Hat shares its best practices for testing Linux, KVM and OpenShift.

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Fedora 21 Released, Work on 22 Already Begun

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Red Hat

The top story today is the release of Fedora 21. Jamie Watson said it was worth the year-long development wait and it was so anticipated that Fedora infrastructure suffered a major service disruption. Servers were reported down today at 4:41 PM but all systems were a GO by 7:21 this evening. Adam Williamson also posted about the beginnings of work on version 22, so no rest for the weary.

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Happy Fedora Day

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Red Hat

Video: Security Features in systemd

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Linux
Red Hat
Security

Lennart Poettering gave a presentation for NLUUG on Nov. 20th, 2014 entitled, "Security Features in systemd".

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Fedora 21 Release Review: An Impressive Developer Workstation

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Red Hat
Reviews

Fedora is among the most respected Linux-based distributions. Known as a bleeding edge operating system it offers the latest technologies at the earliest stages. It’s also known for working with upstream projects instead of patching things downstream.

Fedora displays both qualities due to the fact that Fedora/Red Hat developers are among the leading contributors to many major open source projects, including the Linux kernel; they work for everyone and not just for their own distribution.

Fedora 21 has just been released and I have been playing with the beta for a while. There are now three editions of Fedora: server, workstation and cloud. Since I am using it for my desktop I downloaded and installed the Workstation.

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Red Hat product president Paul Cormier disses the Docker myth

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Red Hat

So just what is the relationship between red-hot container company Docker and open source stalwart Red Hat? Are the two companies on the same side, or not? Do Docker containers complement or compete with Red Hat's Linux offerings?

To get some answers, I talked with Paul Cormier, Red Hat's president of products and technologies, and he had some pretty strong opinions on the subject. But it all boils down to Red Hat's position that container technology (and Docker) simply isn't the be-all and end-all that many people seem to want it to be—at least not in the enterprise.

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Also: Red Hat (RHT) Stock Declines Today After Analyst Downgrade

Wells Fargo Cuts Red Hat To Hold, Says Stock Lacks Catalysts, Has Little Upside

LiveUSB-Creator Is Ready For Fedora 21

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Red Hat

Fedora's Live USB Creator, aptly named liveusb-creator, hasn't seen much attention recently but with Fedora 21 due out tomorrow it was updated just in time. The latest version, liveusb-creator 3.13, is now available in the Fedora repositories.

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Also: The Cockpit Management Console In Fedora 21 Makes Linux Administration Easy

Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat

Huawei and Red Hat to Deliver Carrier-Grade, OpenStack-based Cloud Solutions

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Red Hat
Server

As part of this initiative, Huawei and Red Hat aim to combine Huawei's world class domain expertise and extensive global experience with telecommunications companies and Red Hat's leading OpenStack and open source expertise to help CSPs embrace cloud computing with a carrier-grade OpenStack solution. Huawei and Red Hat plan to integrate Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform and Huawei’s FusionSphere Cloud OS at the management layer to offer a unified open, flexible, and production-ready cloud solution to support telecommunication carriers' NFV evolution. Working together, Huawei and Red Hat plan to align upstream contributions, engineering, product, and go-to-market efforts to drive the adoption of OpenStack for NFV implementations by CSPs.

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Fedora 21's Performance Is Close To Ubuntu 14.10

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

Fedora 21 is due out in a few days and as such I've been busy extensively testing and benchmarking this first Fedora Linux update in a year. To not much surprise given the close package versions to Ubuntu 14.10, Fedora 21 isn't performing very differently from the Ubuntu Utopic Unicorn.

Most of the Linux distribution performance comparisons don't turn up much assuming the Linux kernel, compiler, and Mesa components are close to the same version. From there it mostly comes down to the defaults for the CPU scaling driver/governor, I/O scheduler, etc. With Fedora 21 compared to Ubuntu 14.10 and Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS, the results are very close.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: ASUS, Tesla and HackerOne

  • Hackers Hijacked ASUS Software Updates to Install Backdoors on Thousands of Computers
    Researchers at cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab say that ASUS, one of the world’s largest computer makers, was used to unwittingly install a malicious backdoor on thousands of its customers’ computers last year after attackers compromised a server for the company’s live software update tool. The malicious file was signed with legitimate ASUS digital certificates to make it appear to be an authentic software update from the company, Kaspersky Lab says. ASUS, a multi-billion dollar computer hardware company based in Taiwan that manufactures desktop computers, laptops, mobile phones, smart home systems, and other electronics, was pushing the backdoor to customers for at least five months last year before it was discovered, according to new research from the Moscow-based security firm. The researchers estimate half a million Windows machines received the malicious backdoor through the ASUS update server, although the attackers appear to have been targeting only about 600 of those systems. The malware searched for targeted systems through their unique MAC addresses. Once on a system, if it found one of these targeted addresses, the malware reached out to a command-and-control server the attackers operated, which then installed additional malware on those machines. Kaspersky Lab said it uncovered the attack in January after adding a new supply-chain detection technology to its scanning tool to catch anomalous code fragments hidden in legitimate code or catch code that is hijacking normal operations on a machine. The company plans to release a full technical paper and presentation about the ASUS attack, which it has dubbed ShadowHammer, next month at its Security Analyst Summit in Singapore. In the meantime, Kaspersky has published some of the technical details on its website.
  • Hackers break into the Tesla car web browser to win a Model 3
  • Sonatype and HackerOne partner on open source vulnerability reporting

Games: Overland, Lutris, Dead Cells and Fossilize

  • The impressive squad-based survival strategy game Overland to release this autumn
    Overland from Finji is a beautiful looking and impressive squad-based strategy game and they've now announced a release window.
  • The open source game manager Lutris had another sweet update recently
    What's that, too many launchers or no easy way to manage GOG games on Linux? Lutris might solve this problem for you. Giving you the ability to install and manage games from Steam, GOG, Humble Store, Emulators and more it's a pretty handy application to keep around. This latest release is mostly improving on existing features like downloading the default Wine version when not already available, preventing duplicated entries when importing games from a 3rd party, one search bar to rule them all, improved log handling performance, using your discrete GPU by default on compatible systems and more.
  • Dead Cells - Rise of the Giant free DLC to release this week, over 1 million copies sold
    Ready for just one more run? The Dead Cells - Rise of the Giant free DLC is releasing this week (March 28th) as Motion Twin celebrate good sales. The developer spoke at GDC and they went on to mention that Dead Cells has now officially sold over 1 million copies! Around 60% of that was on PC too, so the indie market for good games is still alive and well by the looks of it.
  • Fossilize Is Valve's Latest Open-Source Vulkan Project
    Valve Software has been backing work on Fossilize as an open-source project providing a serialization format for persistent Vulkan object types. Valve has been backing Hans-Kristian Arntzen to work on this Vulkan project while it has also seen commits by their in-house Vulkan guru Dan Ginsburg. The Fossilize library and Vulkan layer is intended so these persistent Vulkan persistent object types can be backed by the pipeline cache, a Vulkan layer to capture the cache, and the ability to replay the cache on different devices without having to run the application itself.

Graphics: Wayland and Vulkan

  • Canonical Reportedly Not Planning To Enable Wayland-By-Default For Ubuntu 20.04 LTS
    Since the short-lived Ubuntu 17.10 GNOME + Wayland experience, the Ubuntu desktop has still been using the trusted X.Org Server session by default. While Ubuntu 19.04 will soon be shipping and the Ubuntu 19.10 development cycle then getting underway, don't look for any Wayland-by-default change to be around the corner. Twice in the past week I've received communication from two indicating that Canonical reportedly isn't planning on enabling Wayland-by-default for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. If Canonical were planning to go ahead with Wayland used by default, they would need to make the change for Ubuntu 19.10 as is customary for them to make large changes in the LTS-release-1 version in order to facilitate more widespread testing ahead of the Long Term Support cycle. But Canonical engineers feel that the Wayland support isn't mature enough to enable in the next year for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.
  • Vulkan Working To Expose Video Encode/Decode, Machine Learning
    During this week's Game Developers Conference was the usual Khronos Dev Day where Vulkan, WebGL, glTF, and OpenXR took center stage. During the Vulkan State of the Union some details on their future endeavors were covered. Among some of the larger efforts that are "in flight" are improving the portability of Vulkan to closed platforms without native drivers (MoltenVK, etc), continuing to work on ray-tracing (complementing the existing VK_NV_ray_tracing), exposing video encode/decode through Vulkan, exposing machine learning capabilities, and the separate effort on safety critical Vulkan.

OSS: Blockchain, DeepBrain, Redox OS, OpenBuilds, Red Hat Summit and FOSSASIA

  • It's About Time DApps Unlocked the Mass-Market Momentum for Blockchain
    There’s more to Blockchain technology than Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. At its fundamental level, Blockchain technology engenders trusts in inherently trustless environments. Protocol blockchains such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, EOS, GoChain, Steem and xDai have provided a launchpad for developers to work on DApps. DApps are typically open source applications not owned by anyone, immune from downtimes; and that cannot be shut down by a government or its agencies. The rapid proliferation of Decentralized Applications (DApps) powered a bull run in cryptocurrencies in 2017. Right now, there are more than 2000 DApps designed to solve specific market problems across industries such as health, data storage, finance, gaming, and governance.
  • DeepBrain Chain outlines release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta in progress report
    DeepBrain Chain detailed the release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta of its AI Training Net, which allows users to rent computing power to train artificial intelligence algorithms. DeepBrain Chain claimed numerous feature inclusions and and improvements, many pertaining to the scheduling and activation of tasks. In DBC 0.3.6.0, if an AI training task has been stopped a specified period of time, its storage will be deleted automatically. However, the task can be restarted at any time before deletion. If a node has been restarted, reactivation of any previous training tasks will require manual user authorization. [...] A decision was made recently by the community concerning the open source licensing of DeepBrain Chain’s code. Over 55 percent of the members polled voted to not make the code fully open source by the end of March.
  • Redox OS 0.5.0
    It has been one year and four days since the last release of Redox OS! In this time, we have been hard at work improving the Redox ecosystem. Much of this work was related to relibc, a new C library written in Rust and maintained by the Redox OS project, and adding new packages to the cookbook. We are proud to report that we have now far exceeded the capabilities of newlib, which we were using as our system C library before. We have added many important libraries and programs, which you can see listed below.
  • Redox OS 0.5 Released With New C Library Written In Rust
    It's been just over one year since the previous release of Redox OS while today this Rust-written operating system has finally been succeeded by Redox OS 0.5.  It's taken a while since the previous release of Redox OS as they have been focusing their attention on Relibc, a C library implementation written within the Rust programming language. Relibc is now used as the operating system's default C library.
  • Get Moving with New Software from OpenBuilds
    If you’re reading Hackaday, you’ve probably heard of OpenBuilds. Even if the name doesn’t sound familiar, you’ve absolutely seen something on these pages that was built with their components. Not only is OpenBuilds a fantastic place to get steppers, linear rails, lead screws, pulleys, wheels, and whatever else you need to make your project go, they’re also home to an active forum of people who are passionate about developing open source machines. As if that wasn’t enough reason to head over to the OpenBuilds website, [Peter Van Der Walt] recently wrote in to tell us about some new free and open source software he and the team have been working on that’s designed to make it easier than ever to get your creations cutting, lasing, milling, and whatever else you could possibly imagine. If you’ve got a machine that moves, they’ve got some tools you’ll probably want to check out.
  • Dive into developer-focused sessions at Red Hat Summit
    Red Hat Summit is just around the corner, and it’s shaping up to be best Red Hat developer event ever. This year, attendees will get to choose from more than 300 sessions, not to mention booth presentations, parties, labs, and training. To help you cut through the clutter, we’ve created a list of developer specific activities and sessions that will help you shape your Red Hat Summit experience. Most of these sessions are part of the Cloud-Native App Dev track, with a few other sessions that we think will appeal to you as a developer. For more information on these sessions, visit the Red Hat Summit session listing page and sort by “cloud-native app dev” track.
  • 10th year of FOSSASIA
    This FOSSASIA was special as it marked its 10th year! It was quite impressive to witness a FOSS conference to continue growing this long with growing community. The four day conference schedule was packed with various interesting talks, workshops, hackathon and other engaging activities.