Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat

Iterating on Fedora.NEXT Brand Concept #1

Filed under
Red Hat

Last week I shared a concept for the Fedora.next logos with you, and I received quite a lot of feedback. Thank you for that. Smile The feedback I received mostly clustered along these lines in some form or another:

The server logomark doesn’t read as a server to everyone – it’s too rounded.
The workstation logomark looks too much like a flip phone to read as a laptop.
Okay. I thought I might take that feedback and fart around with the designs some more, and record a bit of a stream of consciousness of what the heck I did so you can follow along and see where it’s coming from. I opened up the SVG source of the original designs in Inkscape and poked around a bit.

Read more

systemd 213 Arrives with Daemon to Sync System Clock Across Network

Filed under
Development
Linux
Red Hat

systemd, a service manager for Linux compatible with SysV and LSB init scripts, which provides aggressive parallelization capabilities and uses socket and D-Bus activation for starting services, has just reached version 213 and comes with a lot of changes and improvements.

Read more

DNF 0.5.2 Released

Filed under
Red Hat

DNF 0.5.2 is being released today. Our biggest hope from this release is that the Unicode-related crashes some people were getting are resolved.

One thing we’ve been repeatedly asked for is autoremove. Delivered in 0.5.2, the command looks at the packages installed, and the reasons why they were installed. Those that were explicitly installed by the user are left untouched. Those that were installed as a dependencies are left untouched if they are needed by some of the packages in the first group, else they are removed. This way only the packages that the user wants and their dependencies remain on the system. Also see the documentation. Note that those people who exclusively use DNF for their packaging operations and have clean_requirements_on_remove enabled will only get empty transactions from autoremove. The rest can benefit.

Read more

Red Hat opens office in Indonesia to target Open Source opportunity

Filed under
Red Hat

Indonesia’s public sector has traditionally promoted Open Source Software adoption, something which was cited by Red Hat as a reason for establishing a presence in Southeast Asia’s largest economy.

Read more

Open Source Chief at Redhat Hit With Bogus Copyright Claims

Filed under
Red Hat
Google

Bogus copyright claims on YouTube are getting more and more prevalent, but they only get exposure when they do damage to high-profile targets. Michael Tiemann is the Chief of Open Source Affairs at Redhat Inc. and apparently he can't use Creative Commons music in his uploads without being bombarded with copyright claims.

Read more

try out the calendar app california on Fedora 20

Filed under
Red Hat

California is simple and to the point. It shows your calendar, appointments, and lets you add appointments too. Pretty much all you need from a calendar app. It is also integrated with the “evolution data server” (the backend service that stores calendar data in Fedora), so your calendars appear in the drop-down when you click the clock at the top of the Fedora desktop.

Read more

Updated Fedora 20 KDE Stack: Something's Funky

Filed under
KDE
Red Hat

One month ago we looked at the latest performance of Fedora 20, but with its more liberal update strategy -- especially with the long release time until Fedora 21 -- we're back with some more tests today as since last month the Linux 3.14 kernel has been added and other changes. This article has benchmarks of the Fedora 20 KDE spin out-of-the-box and then with all available updates as of this week to see how the performance has evolved in the half-year since the F20 release.

Read more

Red Hat’s new model

Filed under
Red Hat

Traditionally software companies have relied upon the ‘unique’ qualities of their software as the selling point, but selling free software is a different proposition. Most, but not all, of the distributions that Distrowatch currently lists began life as copies or derivatives of one or other of the generic Linux distributions – Red Hat, Slackware or Debian – each of which owed some kind of a debt to Linux pre-history in the shape of SLS or Owen le Blanc’s MCC Interim Linux, which is often claimed to be the first installable Linux distribution.

The primary role of a commercial server-based GNU/Linux distribution is not the sale of the software but of follow-up services – subscription, consultancy, installation, training, support, upgrades and maintenance. Advances to free software may come from any number of sources, but for a distribution to succeed it has to have something that differentiates it from the others, an extra layer of polish or a loyal following, and a reputation for providing good service.

Read more

KDE Frameworks 5 Will Come To Fedora 21

Filed under
KDE
Red Hat

For Fedora 21 there is the KDE Frameworks 5 feature with the goal of shipping all of the KF5 library components that can live side-by-side with KDE4. Some of the packages have already landed into Fedora Rawhide while the rest are expected in the weeks ahead. However, Fedora 21 isn't being released until late in 2014... For Fedora KDE users right now running Fedora 20, fortunately there is a solution.

Read more

Red Hat and Canonical to Increasingly Compete with OpenStack

Filed under
Red Hat
Ubuntu

Red Hat was flush with announcements in conjunction with the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta last week, as we covered here. The company announced that itt is open sourcing the ManageIQ cloud orchestration platform, and it also announced some important new collaboration deals surrounding OpenStack. However, one thing that also became clear in Atlanta is that Canonical's new focus on delivering and supporting private OpenStack clouds is going to create very direct competition with Red Hat.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

How to enable developer mode on a Chrome OS tablet (and install Linux using Crouton)

Google’s Chrome OS is designed to be a relatively secure, simple operating system that’s easy to use and hard to mess up. But you can run stable channel, beta channel, or dev channel software on any Chromebook depending on whether you want the safest experience or buggy, bleeding-edge features. There’s also an option called Developer Mode, which is different from the dev channel. It allows you to access files and settings that are normally protected and use a command shell to explore the system. It’s designed for developers and advanced users only, since it increases the chances that you’ll break your Chromebook. But enabling Developer Mode is also a prerequisite for using one my favorite Chrome OS hacks: a tool called Crouton that allows you to install Ubuntu or another GNU/Linux distribution and run it alongside Chrome OS. Read more

Red Hat News and Press

Belated Thoughts on van Rossum’s Departure

  • Is BDFL a death sentence?
    A few days ago, Guido van Rossum, creator of the Python programming language and Benevolent Dictator For Life (BDFL) of the project, announced his intention to step away. Below is a portion of his message, although the entire email is not terribly long and worth taking the time to read if you’re interested in the circumstances leading to van Rossum’s departure.
  • Thoughts on Guido retiring as BDFL of Python
    I've been programming in Python for almost 20 years on a myriad of open source projects, tools for personal use, and work. I helped out with several PyCon US conferences and attended several others. I met a lot of amazing people who have influenced me as a person and as a programmer. I started PyVideo in March 2012. At a PyCon US after that (maybe 2015?), I found myself in an elevator with Guido and somehow we got to talking about PyVideo and he asked point-blank, "Why work on that?" I tried to explain what I was trying to do with it: create an index of conference videos across video sites, improve the meta-data, transcriptions, subtitles, feeds, etc. I remember he patiently listened to me and then said something along the lines of how it was a good thing to work on. I really appreciated that moment of validation. I think about it periodically. It was one of the reasons Sheila and I worked hard to transition PyVideo to a new group after we were burned out.

Catfish 1.4.6 Released

  • Catfish 1.4.6 Released, Now an Xfce Project
    It’s a great day for fans of the fast and powerful Catfish search utility. With the 1.4.6 release, Catfish now officially joins the Xfce family. Additionally, there’s been some nice improvements to the thumbnailer and a large number of bugs have been squashed.
  • Catfish Search Utility Joins The Xfce Project
    The Catfish search utility now officially lives under the Xfce umbrella. Catfish is a GTK3-based and Python 3.x written program for searching for files on the system. Catfish has long been common to Xfce desktop systems and complementary to the Thunar file manager. The Catfish 1.4.6 release was made this weekend and with this version has now officially become part of the Xfce project.