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Red Hat

Fermilab Releases Scientific Linux 7.0 Alpha 2

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat

The second Alpha version of Scientific Linux 7.0, a recompiled Red Hat Enterprise Linux put together by various labs and universities around the world, is now available for download and testing.

The developers of Scientific Linux 7.0 have moved very fast and, just a week after the first Release Candidate, a new development release has been made available. Given the short development period since the first Alpha, it's actually surprising that the devs managed to get all those changes and improvements in.

“Fermilab's intention is to continue the development and support of Scientific Linux and refine its focus as an operating system for scientific computing. Today we are announcing an alpha release of Scientific Linux 7. We continue to develop a stable process for generating and distributing Scientific Linux, with the intent that Scientific Linux remains the same high quality operating system the community has come to expect.”

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CentOS 7 Comes on the Heels of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

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Red Hat

The CentOS 7 Linux operating system became generally available July 7, providing users with a freely available desktop, server and cloud operating system platform. CentOS, an acronym for Community Enterprise Operating System, is based on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7 enterprise OS, released June 10. Unlike RHEL 7, which is a commercially supported enterprise Linux release that requires users to have a paid subscription, CentOS is free. That said, CentOS lacks the support, services and certifications that Red Hat provides its RHEL subscribers. CentOS does, however, provide the same basic technologies as RHEL 7, but for those who don't need or want the additional enterprise-grade commercial services, CentOS is a free alternative. Red Hat is now an official support and partner of the CentOS community, as well, ever since a surprise announcement in January. CentOS inherits the same XFS file system used in RHEL 7, which provides a file system that can scale up to 500 terabytes. Docker container virtualization support is also part of the CentOS 7 platform. In this slide show, eWEEK examines the CentOS 7 Linux operating system.

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Red Hat to be a Key Contributor to and Benefactor of the Kubernetes Project

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Red Hat

A few weeks ago, I covered the news that Google had released Kubernetes under an open-source license, which is software to manage computing workloads across thousands of computer servers and leverage docker containers. We've also covered Google's announcement that some vey big contributors have joined the Kubernetes project, including IBM, Microsoft, Red Hat, Docker, CoreOS, Mesosphere, and SaltStack. They are working in tandem on open source tools and container technologies that can run on multiple computers and networks.

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Red Hat CEO Whitehurst on VMware, OpenStack and CentOS

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Red Hat
Interviews

"Open source gives us brand permission to enter a ton of categories," said Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst.

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CentOS 6.5 vs. CentOS 7.0 NAS Performance Comparison

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

RedHat Enterprise Linux is an enterprise-grade Linux distribution, which is frequently used in corporate data centers as an operating system for NAS storage devices. From the performance point of view, the new Linux kernel and the new default file system may have a significant impact on a NAS storage device and therefore it is very important to understand how the newly released RedHat Enterprise Linux version 7.0 compares to the last stable version 6.5.

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Preview: Benchmarking CentOS 7.0 & Scientific Linux 7.0

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

In this article just for putting the initial CentOS/SL results into some perspective, I have some initial data from a single Intel Core i7 system running these new releases plus Fedora and Ubuntu Linux. Just as some initial metrics to get started with our benchmarking, from an Intel Core i7 4770K system with 8GB of RAM, 150GB Western Digital VelociRaptor HDD, and Intel HD Graphics 4600, I tested the four Linux distributions. The hardware and its settings were maintained the same during testing.

Originally for this first article I also hoped to test Scientific Linux / CentOS 6.5 too, but after doing the 7.0 tests and trying to boot the 6.5 releases, there was a kernel error preventing the testing from being realized (on initial boot was the i915 DRM error about detecting more than eight display outputs; when booting without DRM/KMS mode-setting support, there would be an agpgart error.) The i915 issue is corrected on future kernel revisions but for this system it was preventing the 6.5 releases from running nicely. From an older, more workstation focused system I will be running the new vs. old CentOS/SL releases.

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CentOS 7 GNOME Live CD Screenshot Tour

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Red Hat
Reviews

Now that the CentOS 7 Linux kernel-based operating system has been officially released, the time has come to enjoy some screenshots of this beautiful distribution of Linux based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

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DESKTOP CONTAINERS – THE WAY FORWARD

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Red Hat
Server

One feature we are spending quite a bit of effort in around the Workstation is container technologies for the desktop. This has been on the wishlist for quite some time and luckily the pieces for it are now coming together. Thanks to strong collaboration between Red Hat and Docker we have a great baseline to start from. One of the core members of the desktop engineering team, Alex Larsson, has been leading the Docker integration effort inside Red Hat and we are now preparing to build onwards on that work, using the desktop container roadmap created by Lennary Poettering.

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Fedora Gets A Kernel Playground Repository

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Red Hat

The latest Fedora Copr repository established provides a "kernel playground" whereby currently out-of-tree and/or experimental kernel features are enabled for developers and enthusiasts to try out.

Josh Boyer of the Fedora Project has setup the Fedora Kernel Playground as a Copr repository to use if you wish to try out bleeding-edge Linux kernel features. This kernel isn't officially supported, bug reports will be largely ignored, and this kernel isn't recommended for production machines. However, for those wishing to try out kernel features not even found in Fedora Rawhide, this is a great repository without having to patch and spin your own kernel.

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When Fedora Installations Pay Better ;)

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Red Hat

Ubuntu has a LTS while upgrading it only takes a click, so everyone can make it, but to upgrade Fedora you need to have more expertise and you have to upgrade around once every year!

Yeap, Fedora installations do pay better Smile

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More in Tux Machines

A Proposal To Allow Python Scripting Within The GCC Compiler, Replacing AWK

A SUSE developer is seeking feedback and interest on the possibility of allowing a scripting language -- most likely Python -- to be used within the GCC compiler code-base. This would primarily be used for replacing existing AWK scripts. GCC developer Martin Liška at SUSE is seeking comments on the possibility of adding Python as an accepted language within the GCC code-base. This isn't anything along the likes of replacing existing GCC C compiler code into a scripting language or anything to that effect, but is targeting at replacing current AWK scripts that are hard to maintain. Read more

GNU: The GNU C Library, IRC Break, and GNUstep

  • Intel CET With Indirect Branch Tracking & Shadow Stack Land In Glibc
    Landing yesterday in Glibc for Intel's Control-flow Enforcement Technology (CET) were the instructions for Indirect Branch Tracking (IBT) and Shadow Stack (SHSTK). These Intel CET bits for the GNU C Library amount to a fair amount of code being added. The commit message explains some of the CET steps taken. The Control-flow Enforcement Technology behavior can be changed for SHSTK/IBT at run-time through the "GLIBC_TUNABLES" environment variable.
  • No Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup on Friday July 20th
    No meeting will be taking place this week due to travel, but meetings will return to our regular schedule starting on Friday, July 27th.
  • Graphos GNUstep and Tablet interface
    I have acquired a Thinkpad X41 Tablet and worked quite a bit on it making it usable and then installing Linux and of course GNUstep on it. The original battery was dead and the compatible replacement I got is bigger, it works very well, but makes the device unbalanced. Anyway, my interest about it how usable GNUstep applications would be and especially Graphos, its (and my) drawing application. Using the interface in Tablet mode is different: the stylus is very precise and allows clicking by pointing the tip and a second button is also possible. However, contrary to the mouse use, the keyboard is folded so no keyboard modifiers are possible. Furthermore GNUstep has no on-screen keyboard so typing is not possible.

Oracle Solaris 11.3 and Solaris 11.4

  • Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 34 Brings GCC 7.3, Other Package Updates
    While Solaris 11.4 is still in the oven being baked at Oracle, the thirty-fourth stable release update of Solaris 11.3 is now available.
  • Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU 34 released
    Full details of this SRU can be found in My Oracle Support Doc 2421850.1. For the list of Service Alerts affecting each Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU, see Important Oracle Solaris 11.3 SRU Issues (Doc ID 2076753.1).
  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Open Beta Refresh 2
    As we continue to work toward release of Oracle Solaris 11.4, we present to you our third release of Oracle Solaris 11.4 open beta.
  • Oracle Solaris 11.4 Public Beta Updated With KPTI For Addressing Meltdown
    In addition to sending down a new SRU for Solaris 11.3, the Oracle developers left maintaining Solaris have issued their second beta of the upcoming Solaris 11.4. Oracle Solaris 11.4 Open Beta Refresh 2 is an updated version of their public beta of Solaris 11.4 originally introduced in January. They say this is the last planned public beta with the general availability release now nearing availability.

Security: Back Doors in Voting Machines, Two-Factor Authentication, Introduction to Cybersecurity, and Reproducible Builds

  • Top Voting Machine Vendor Admits It Installed Remote-Access Software on Systems Sold to States
    The nation's top voting machine maker has admitted in a letter to a federal lawmaker that the company installed remote-access software on election-management systems it sold over a period of six years, raising questions about the security of those systems and the integrity of elections that were conducted with them. In a letter sent to Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) in April and obtained recently by Motherboard, Election Systems and Software acknowledged that it had "provided pcAnywhere remote connection software … to a small number of customers between 2000 and 2006," which was installed on the election-management system ES&S sold them. The statement contradicts what the company told me and fact checkers for a story I wrote for the New York Times in February. At that time, a spokesperson said ES&S had never installed pcAnywhere on any election system it sold. "None of the employees, … including long-tenured employees, has any knowledge that our voting systems have ever been sold with remote-access software," the spokesperson said.
  • PSA: Make Sure You Have a Backup for Two-Factor Authentication
  • An Introduction to Cybersecurity: The First Five Steps
    You read all these headlines about the latest data breaches, and you worry your organization could be next. After all, if TalkTalk, Target, and Equifax can’t keep their data safe, what chance do you have? Well, thankfully, most organizations aren’t quite as high profile as those household names, and probably don’t receive quite so much attention from cybercriminals. At the same time, though, no organization is so small or insignificant that it can afford to neglect to take sensible security measures. If you’re just starting to take cybersecurity seriously, here are five steps you can take to secure your organization more effectively than 99 percent of your competitors.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #168