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Red Hat

Tools for Diagramming in Fedora

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Red Hat

If you’re a big-time open source fanatic like me, you probably get questions about open source alternatives to proprietary tools rather frequently. From the ‘Alternatives to Microsoft® Visio®’ department, here are three tips that should help designers who use Visio in an open source environment. If you need an open source option for opening Visio files, a revived open source application for creating diagrams, or a lesser-known open source tool for converting Visio® stencils, these tips are for you...

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Red Hat's CEO Sees Open Source Cloud Domination

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Red Hat
OSS

Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst sees the business opportunity of a generation in what he calls a computing paradigm shift from client server to cloud architectures. “In those paradigm shifts, generally new winners emerge,” says Whitehurst and he intends to make sure Red Hat is one of those winners. His logic is sound and simple: disruptive technologies like the cloud that arise every couple decades level the playing field between large, established firms and smaller, innovative challengers since everyone, from corporate behemoth to a couple guys in a garage, starts from the same spot and must play by the same unfamiliar and changeable rules. With the cloud “there’s less of an installed based and an opportunity for new winners to be chosen,” Whitehurst adds. His mission is “to see that open source is the default choice for next generation architecture” and that Red Hat is the preferred choice, particularly for enterprise IT, of open source providers.

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The ultimate Scientific Linux pimping guide

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Red Hat
Reviews

Several weeks back, we reviewed Scientific Linux 6.5, a rather spartan incarnation of the legendary RHEL 6, which might be considered too boring and outdated for modern home use. Well, not so. Once long ago, I showed you how to transform CentOS into a home use beast.

Today, we will do it again, with the most comprehensive guide on Scientific Linux pimping ever made on Planet Earth. Here, you get a bit of everything, and then so. Best of all? This guide is also relevant for CentOS and even Fedora, so make sure you keep it close to your heart. Let's go.

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The new (potential) notification system for Fedora

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Red Hat

This new design allows for a greater amount of detail when glancing at your notifications, rather than just an icon, and the number of unread notifications. The upstream developers seem to be targeting getting this new design implemented for GNOME 3.14, so hopefully we should see this in Fedora 21 Workstation.

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Valve improved X-Box gamepad driver for Fedora

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Red Hat
Gaming

I’ve added to the Steam package repository for Fedora an alternative kernel module for xpad, the X-Box gamepad driver. This variant contains patches created by Valve to improve the driver and its behaviour.

The module is available in both akmod (RPMFusion) and dkms package formats.

This made my 3rd party X-Box controller work without any issue in Steam games and in the Big Picture Mode interface!

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A GTKINSPECTOR UPDATE

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Red Hat

I’ve first introduced GtkInspector a few weeks ago. Since then, it has made it into the GTK+ 3.13.2 development release and is
now available in Fedora rawhide, which should hopefully make debugging of GTK+ applications in Fedora easier.

I’ve continued to work on the inspector, and it is time to give an update on what it can do now. So far, my focus has been mostly on covering more of GTK+’s features at a basic level, and so much on adding sophisticated debugging support. That will probably change over time.

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Red Hat Software Collections 1.1 Now Generally Available

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Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat Software Collections 1.1, the second iteration of Red Hat’s comprehensive suite of powerful web development tools, dynamic languages and open source databases. Delivered on a separate life cycle from Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a more frequent release cadence, Red Hat Software Collections puts the latest stable open source runtime components, as tested and verified by Red Hat on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, in the hands of developers faster, accelerating the creation and deployment of modern web applications.

Red Hat Software Collections 1.1 bridges developer agility and production stability by providing a compelling solution to organizations seeking to leverage agile methods as a means of boosting the pace of software delivery. Enterprises can deploy applications built with Red Hat Software Collections 1.1 with confidence, as each release of Red Hat Software Collections is backed by Red Hat’s award-winning support for three years.

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Tracking your time and tasks on Fedora

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Red Hat
Software

Being a research student is really tough. I mean tough! The most difficult part is keeping up the self discipline, day after day, week after week. As a research student, you make your own schedule, you even make your own syllabus pretty much. I handle the syllabus part just fine, but I struggle with maintaining a disciplined schedule. It takes a while to get into a stable rhythm where you work according to plan and remain focussed on the task at hand, for however long it takes. On the other hand, it’s really easy to upset said rhythm: a late night coding spree, a night out with friends, an unexpected task that makes you diverge from your plan for the day etc. are often sufficient to make me sleep late and mess up the next day. Self discipline requires commitment, and a lot of hard work. Luckily, I’m not alone in this struggle. Here’s a helpful post on improving self discipline: http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/self-discipline/. Since I spend most of my day at a computer, I went around and looked for tools that would help me keep focussed on my work; keep me away from distractions (yes, Facebook is a distraction); and help me work according to the plans I make.

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New Sandboxing Features Come To Systemd

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Lennart Poettering has added two new service sandboxing features to systemd.

For improving the security of Linux services, Lennart added ReadOnlySystem and ProtectedHome settings for services. ReadOnlySystem will mount /usr and /boot as read-only for the specific service. The ProtectedHome setting mounts /home and /run/user as read-only or replaces it with an empty, inaccessible directory.

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First Thoughts as Fedora Project Leader

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Red Hat

I’m proud to have been part of the Fedora community since the early days. I’m grateful to have been given the opportunity to work on Fedora as my full-time job for the past year and a half. And now, I’m excited to be stepping into a new place within the community as Fedora Project Leader. These are incredible times in computing and in free and open source software, and we have incredible things going on in Fedora to match — the next years are full of opportunity and growth for the whole project and community, and I’m thrilled to be in a position to help.

Of course, in keeping with that Friends foundation, I won’t be doing anything alone. Fedora’s true leadership strength comes from its community board, and I’ll be working with the rest of the board and the Fedora community in general to find ways to strengthen and empower that leadership, along with that from other governance groups in Fedora, including FESCo, FAmSCo, and all of our other teams, committees, subprojects, SIGs, and working groups. (Oh my.) I’ve worked with a lot of you in a lot of these areas, but there are other parts of the project and community that I’m not yet so familiar with. My initial focus is going to be on expanding that, and I look forward to growing my circle of Fedora friends and to hear your thoughts and ideas on everything. I’m almost always available (as mattdm) on Freenode IRC, and I’m planning on setting up regular “virtual office hours” (stay tuned).

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE

OSS Leftovers