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Red Hat

Developer Wants to Revive Fedora Linux for the MIPS Architecture

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Michal Toman, a Fedora developer known for his work on ABRT (Automatic Bug Reporting Tool), as well as the PowerPC (PPC) and s390 ports of the operating system, has posted a message on the Fedora Linux mailing list, announcing that he wants to revive the MIPS port of Fedora.

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Default Local DNS Resolver Proposed for Fedora 23 Linux

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Linux
Red Hat

After having proposed the Cinnamon and Netizen Spins for the upcoming Fedora 23 Linux operating system, Jan Kurik comes with yet another interesting proposition: the addition of a default local DNS resolver.

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Five different ways to handle leap seconds with NTP

Filed under
Development
Linux
Red Hat

A leap second is an adjustment that is once in a while applied to the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) to keep it close to the mean solar time. The concept is similar to that of leap day, but instead of adding a 29th day to February to keep the calendar synchronized with Earth’s orbit around the Sun, an extra second 23:59:60 is added to the last day of June or December to keep the time of the day synchronized with the Earth’s rotation relative to the Sun. The mean solar day is about 2 milliseconds longer than 24 hours and in long term it’s getting longer as the Moon is constantly slowing down the Earth’s rotation.

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Traditional Management Structure Is Obsolete, Red Hat CEO Says

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Red Hat

An outspoken champion of that message is Jim Whitehurst, president and CEO of Raleigh-based Red Hat Software, the high-profile, $10 billion provider of open source software to the enterprise community. In his new book, “The Open Organization: Igniting Passion and Performance,” Whitehurst argues that “Red Hat is the only company that can say that it emerged out of a pure bottom-up culture—namely, the open source ethos—and learned how to execute it at scale.”

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Fedora 23 May Feature Cinnamon Desktop Spin & "Netizen" Version

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Red Hat

Fedora 23 might be featuring some new ISO spins of the Linux distribution, including one with the Cinnamon Desktop and a "Netizen" spin focused on "Internet citizenship and citizen engagement."

The proposed Fedora 23 Cinnamon spin is quite self explanatory and is outlined further via this Fedora Wiki page. The Cinnamon Desktop is already packaged within Fedora repositories but this is about shipping an easy-to-deply Fedora Cinnamon experience rather than first having to install Fedora GNOME or other alternatives.

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also: PostInstallerF: Yet Another Tool That Helps the Fedora 22 Users Install Third Party Apps on Fresh Installed Systems

Fedora-Based Chapeau 20 Linux Distro Reaches End of Life on June 23

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

We reported earlier this week that the developers of the Chapeau Linux distro based on the well-known Fedora operating system are hard at work preparing to unleash the next major version of the distribution, Chapeau 22, based on Fedora 22.

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Fedora's FedUp Upgrade Utility to be Redesigned for Fedora 23

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Red Hat

The Fedora Project developers are discussing these days the possibility of redesigning their internal upgrade utility for the Fedora Linux operating system.

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Fedora Tools

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Future Plans For Changing Fedora's Installer

    Over the last couple weeks there has been an "Anaconda Wishlist" thread occurring on Fedora's desktop mailing list. The thread, and the associated Workstation Working Group meeting, are directed at the future of the Fedora Anaconda Installer.

  • Tweak Your Fedora 22 Desktop Using Fedy And PostinstallerF

    None of the Linux distributions comes with all essential applications for daily usage, Agree? You have to install additional Repositories, softwares like Chrome, Flash player, Java or something in order to get a perfect distro for the daily usage. We can do it in two methods. First, you can manually search and install all the required softwares one by one, and the second one is you can use a tool that will help you to find and install all essential applications from one place. Which method would you prefer? I prefer the second method most, not because it is easy, but also it saves some time.

  • 27 ‘DNF’ (Fork of Yum) Commands for RPM Package Management in Linux

Red Hat CEO: Public cloud "obscenely expensive at scale"

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Red Hat

Whitehurst believes Amazon Web Services (AWS) makes sense for test and dev, but it can't compete with private cloud at scale. Do you agree?

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Also:

Letter to the Fedora council - is the Fedora community forgetting its primary goal?

Filed under
Red Hat

I've been around in the community for quite a bit, and while I'm not a kernel-dev or a team lead, I still like to think I belong to the community - helping where I can. Why I've stuck around over the years, other than because I've made friends in the community that I'd miss, is the philosophy of Fedora - the stance we take towards FOSS - which distinguishes us from any other Linux distribution.

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Also: New Labs, Spins and ARM websites for Fedora 22

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SUSE: openSUSE Tumbleweed and SUSE in HPC

  • Krita, Linux Kernel, KDEConnect Get Updated in Tumbleweed
    There have been a few openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released in the past two weeks that brought some new features and fixes to users. This blog will go over the past two snapshots. The last snapshot, 20180416, had several packages updated. The adobe-sourceserifpro-fonts package updated to version 2.000; with the change, the fonts were refined to make the Semibold and Bold heavier. Both dbus-1 and dbus-1-x11 were updated to 1.12.6, which fixed some regreations introduced in version 1.10.18 and 1.11.0. The gtk-vnc 0.7.2 package deprecated the manual python2 binding, which will be deleted in the next release, in favor of GObject introspection. Notifications that caused a crash were fixed in kdeconnect-kde 1.3.0. The 4.16.2 Linux Kernel made ip_tunnel, ipv6, ip6_gre, ip6_tunnel and vti6 better to validate user provided tunnel names. Due to a build system failure, not all 4.16.2 binaries were built correctly; this will be resolved in the 20180417 snapshot, which will be released shortly. Krita 4.0.1 had multiple fixes from its major version upgrade. The visual diff and merge tool meld 3.19.0 added new features like a new per-pane status bar with selectors for syntax highlighting and text encoding. Python Imaging Library python-Pillow 5.1.0 removed the freetype-2.9.patch and YaST had several packages with a version bump.
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing in the SLE 15 Beta Program!
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module
    The upcoming release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 is offering an HPC (High Performance Computing) module for development, control, and compute nodes. Today that SLE15-HPC module is now available in beta.

OPNsense 18.1.6

For more than 3 years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the code base, quick and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing. Read more

Turris MOX is a Modular & Open Source Router

A company from the Czech Republic is trying to raise money to bring a modular and open source router to the public. It has a number of features that can’t be found in the current line up of routers available for purchase. Read more