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Red Hat

Battery Work for Fedora 28, Spec Change Statistics

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  • Improving Linux battery life, enabling PSR by default, testers wanted

    As you've probably read already I'm working on improving Linux laptop battery live, previously I've talked about enabling SATA link powermanagement by default. This is now enabled in rawhide / Fedora 28 since January 1st and so far no issues have been reported. This is really good news as this leads to significantly better idle power consumption (1 - 1.5W lower) on laptops with sata disks. Fedora 28 will also enable HDA codec autosuspend and autosuspend for USB Bluetooth controllers, for another (aprox) 0.8W gain.

  • Fedora 28 Will Hopefully Enable Intel PSR To Further Conserve Laptop Power

    Red Hat developer Hans de Goede has recently been on a mission to improve Linux battery life on Fedora. Now that SATA link power management is better handled and other tweaks, his latest target is on getting Intel's Panel Self Refresh (PSR) support enabled.

    Panel Self Refresh has been available for years but isn't enabled by default since for some hardware it can run into issues. PSR is part of the Embedded DisplayPort standard (eDP) for conserving power by being able to refresh the screen pixels directly when the screen's contents is not changing. PSR is supported by laptops/ultrabooks with eDP-based panels for the past several years, but again some quirky hardware can have issues with this functionality enabled.

  • Spec change statistics

    Over the last couple of days I took a look at all the spec files in Fedora. I wanted to find out how many packages have not been updated by someone else than release engineering for mass-rebuilds.

Red Hat News

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  • MYCOM OSI collaborates with Red Hat for telco cloud assurance

    MYCOM OSI, the leading independent provider of Assurance, Automation and Analytics solutions to the world’s largest communications service providers (CSPs), has announced a collaboration with Red Hat, the world's leading provider of open source solutions, to assure and manage telco clouds.

  • Red Hat explains its $250 million purchase of a hot Google-backed startup

    On Tuesday, Red Hat announced the $250 million purchase of CoreOS, a hot startup that competed in the market for "software containers," a trendy developer technology.

    Since its founding in 2013, CoreOS raised $48 million in venture capital — likely making this a solid exit for its high-profile bunch of Silicon Valley investors, including Kleiner Perkins, Intel Capital, Y Combinator, and GV (formerly Google Ventures).

  • Red Hat Buys CoreOS for $250M to Expand Its Kubernetes and Containers Leadership

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, announced that it would acquire CoreOS, Inc., a company known for providing the Container Linux operating system (formerly CoreOS Linux), Tectonic for Kubernetes, and Quay Enterprise container registry, for the price of $250 million USD.

    CoreOS joining Red Hat means automated operations are coming to all. In other words, both companies will work together to expand Kubernetes, the open-source system for automating scaling, deployment, and management of containerized applications in business environments, as well as to innovate in containers and distributed systems.

  • Hot Tickers: Fidelity National Information Services, Inc. (FIS), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)

Red Hat News: More on CoreOS, Upcoming Results (March), Mycom OSI and More

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Red Hat is Buying CoreOS and More News

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Video Acceleration in Fedora 28 and the Rotting of MPEG Due to Software Patents

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Movies
  • Fedora 28 Planning For VA-API 1.0 Support

    The latest work by Fedora developers on feature work for Fedora 28 is shipping with VA-API 1.0 support for updated capabilities around the Video Acceleration API.

    The VA-API 1.0.0 API/ABI is provided by the libva 2.0 video acceleration library. Libva 2.0 was released last October with H.264 FEI support in its API, deprecating older parts of the API, fixing a race condition with the Wayland support, renaming some parts of the API, improving the logging capabilities, and various other changes. Libva 2.0 broke API/ABI compatibility with older versions of this Intel-developed Video Acceleration API.

  • A crisis, the causes and a solution [Ed: LWN says "this blog posting from Leonardo Chiariglione, the founder and chair of MPEG, on how (in his view) the group is being destroyed by free codecs and patent trolls."]

    Because there are rumours spreading about a presumed “MPEG-Video collapse” and Brownian motion-like initiatives trying to remedy – in some cases by the very people who have contributed to creating the “crisis”.

    [...]

    In its 30 years of operation MPEG has created digital media standards that have enabled the birth and continue promoting the growth of digital media products, services and applications. Here are a few, out of close to 180 standards: MP3 for digital music (1992), MPEG-2 for digital television (1994), MPEG-4 Visual for video on internet (1998), MP4 file format for mobile handsets (2001), AVC for reduced bitrate video (2003), DASH for internet streaming (2013), MMT for IP broadcasting (2013) and more. In other words, MPEG standards have had and keep on having an impact on the lives of billions of people.

    [...]

    In 2013 MPEG approved the HEVC standard which provides the same quality as AVC at half the bitrate. The licensing situation is depicted by the picture below (courtesy of Jonathan Samuelsson of Divideon): there are 3 patent pools, one of which has not published their licence and a significant number of patent holders that have not joined any pool (and not published their licences either).

     I saw the threat coming and one year ago I tried to bring the matter to the attention of the higher layers in ISO. My attempts were thwarted by a handful of NPEs.

    Alliance for Open Media (AOM) has occupied the void created by MPEG’s outdated video compression standard (AVC), absence of competitive Options 1 standards (IVC) and unusable modern standard (HEVC). AOM’s AV1 codec, due to be released soon, is claimed to perform better than HEVC and will be offered royalty free.

    [...]

    The work of patent pools would be greatly simplified because they could define profiles with technologies that are “available” because they would know who owns which tools. Users could switch on tools once they become usable, e.g. because the relevant owner has joined a patent pool.

    These are just examples of how the MPEG standard development process can be adapted to better match the needs of entities developing licences and without becoming part – God forbid – of a licence definition process.

    [...]

    Companies will slash their video compression technology investments, thousands of jobs will go and millions of USD of funding to universities will be cut. A successful “access technology at no cost” model will spread to other fields.

    So don’t expect that in the future you will see the progress in video compression technology that we have seen in the past 30 years.

Red Hat: Southeast Asia, Colin Garro's Departure and Financial News

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat and Fedora-based Qubes

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