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Red Hat

Red Hat, IBM and Server Leftovers

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Red Hat
Server
  • Red Hat’s David Egts Talks Open-Source Approaches to Digital Transformation

    David Egts, chief technologist of Red Hat's (NYSE: RHT) North American public sector business, has said that open-source procedures can help organizations meet digital transformation goals while promoting mobility and addressing a skills gap.

    In a Fedscoop interview posted Monday, Egts noted that Red Hat’s Open Innovation Labs works with government customers to help them reduce workload processing time through new software development methods.

  • Empowering the open source community

    Red Hat invests heavily in open source communities, offering our employees' time and skills in many upstreams to advance the pace of innovation and support our customers' interests. And when Red Hat purchases a company, it ensures that any proprietary software becomes available as open source. For instance, just this month, Red Hat shared Quay, the formerly proprietary container registry and security scanner software, as an open source upstream available to all.

    [...]

    Awareness of open source in the Middle East is growing in many sectors, particularly in the telecommunications sphere. As operators seek to evolve from physical to digital players, open source ecosystems and solutions are being implemented to optimise and simplify operations, reduce costs, and facilitate digital transformation agendas. From Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE, to everywhere in between, open source solutions are being unlocked as cost-effective, flexible, reliable, secure, and alternative foundational systems to drive innovation and digital transformation. For telecommunications organisations, open source will enable improved delivery of digital services, the ability to introduce new digital services faster, and the capabilities to leverage insights from data to create new revenue streams.

  • Coders are the new superheroes of natural disasters

    The film, produced by IBM and directed by Austin Peck, centers on the increasing incidents of the devastation of natural disasters, and a cadre of coders who've dedicated their attentions and tech talent to help facilitate and expedite the responders' response to natural disasters. The social-activist developers serve as a frontline defense against some of the society-at-large greatest dangers.

  • Explore Kubernetes with OpenShift in a workshop near you

    The Kubernetes with OpenShift World Tour is a series of in-person workshops around the globe that help you build the skills you need to quickly modernize your applications. This World Tour provides a hands-on experience and teaches the basics of working with the hybrid-cloud, enterprise container platform Red Hat® OpenShift® on IBM Cloud™. You learn coding skills in the world of containerized, cloud-native development with expert developer advocates, who have deep technical experience building cloud microservices and applications with Red Hat OpenShift.

  • IBM VP of ‘opentech’ on the open road ahead

    Moore and his team of open source developers work with open source communities such as the Apache Software Foundation, Linux Foundation, eClipse, OSGi, OpenStack, Cloud Foundry, Docker, JS, Node.js and more.

  • 5 Not to miss Linux hosting providers

    Next to this, Linux based servers have proved to be stable and capable of handling numerous requests at the time. Because no one wants a site that crashes when visitors are trying to get to it. It can be very annoying and bad for business. Linux has a very dedicated community and on the various forums, you can find useful information in dealing with a certain problem that you may encounter.

Red Hat: Containers and Kubernetes, Systemd Everywhere, AMQ Streams on OpenShift and System Administrators

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Red Hat
  • Containers and Kubernetes can be essential to a hybrid cloud computing strategy

    Hybrid cloud is gaining ground among enterprises that want to expand computing resources with public cloud infrastructure while still using their on-premise, data center environments. Adding public cloud can mean more elasticity, scalability, and even faster time to market. But if you want to improve the chances that your hybrid cloud can deliver on its promise, you need to think about adding containers to the mix.

    Linux containers provide a way to encapsulate application code in a way that makes the code more portable and faster to deploy. More and more organizations are using containers as part of the infrastructure for microservices-based, cloud-native applications.

    Containers can be portable across environments such as Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and consistent, so they can speed application delivery times and make it easier for teams to collaborate, even if those teams are working in different deployment environments. And they can serve as a bridge between your data center and public cloud environments.

  • Systemd-homed Looks Like It Will Merged Soon For systemd 245

    Announced back in September at the All Systems Go event in Berlin was systemd-homed as a new effort to improve home directory handling. Systemd-homed wants to make it easier to migrate home directories, ensure all user data is self-contained, unify user-password and encryption handling, and provide other modern takes on home/user directory functionality. That code is expected to soon land in systemd.

    Systemd-homed was talked about by Lennart as being ready for versions 244 or 245. Now that systemd 244 shipped at the end of November, systemd-homed is looking like it will soon land in Git.

  • Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 3

    In the previous articles in this series, we first covered the basics of Red Hat AMQ Streams on OpenShift and then showed how to set up Kafka Connect, a Kafka Bridge, and Kafka Mirror Maker.

  • What personality trait most defines a sysadmin?

    When you think of a system administrator, who do you think of?

    Chances are, most of us have taken a Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test at some point in our careers. For me, my results typically come up as INTJ, and I've always thought the traits associated with that type (introversion, intuition, thinking, judging) have aligned with my interest in technology and the kind of work I enjoy.

    But that doesn't mean that those are the only characteristics that make a good sysadmin. Far from it. A successful team is made up of a diversity of skills, viewpoints, and personal characteristics.

  • How to identify a strong sysadmin job applicant

    When a company looks for new resources with skills in a specific focus area—especially in IT—the challenge is on. Why? Because only a few in the company, if any, have even a vague notion of how to verify the skills they are looking for. The work of a system administrator is a key function, and if it goes wrong, the very existence of the company is at stake (something I’ve been unfortunate to witness when called in on an emergency rescue effort).

Fedora 31 Elections Results

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Red Hat

The Fedora 31 election cycle has concluded. Here are the results for each election. Congratulations to the winning candidates, and thank you all candidates for running in this election!

Council

One Council seat was open this election. A total of 243 ballots were cast, meaning a candidate could accumulate up to 729 votes (243 * 3).

# votes Candidate
520 Dennis Gilmore
259 Alberto Rodríguez Sánchez
237 John M. Harris, Jr.

FESCo

Five FESCo seats were open this election. A total of 273 ballots were cast, meaning a candidate could accumulate up to 2184 votes (273 * 8).

# votes Candidate
1490 Miro Hrončok
1350 Kevin Fenzi
1115 Zbigniew Jędrzejewski-Szmek
879 Fabio Valentini
877 David Cantrell
868 Justin Forbes
813 Randy Barlow
534 Pete Walter

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Also: Fedora program update: 2019-49

5 cool terminal pagers in Fedora

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Red Hat

Large files like logs or source code can run into the thousands of lines. That makes navigating them difficult, particularly from the terminal. Additionally, most terminal emulators have a scrollback buffer of only a few hundred lines. That can make it impossible to browse large files in the terminal using utilities which print to standard output like cat, head and tail. In the early days of computing, programmers solved these problems by developing utilities for displaying text in the form of virtual “pages” — utilities imaginatively described as pagers.

Pagers offer a number of features which make text file navigation much simpler, including scrolling, search functions, and the ability to feature as part of a pipeline of commands. In contrast to most text editors, some terminal pagers do not require loading the entire file for viewing, which makes them faster, especially for very large files.

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Red Hat: AMQ, Analytics, RHEL and More

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Red Hat
  • Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 2
  • Red Hat announces beta access to the Red Hat migration analytics service

    Do you know where your workloads are, their current state and what it would take to modernize them? The answer is likely no. That's why Red Hat is unveiling the Red Hat migration analytics service, currently in beta. Here's what the service offers, and how it can help you with inventory, migration suggestions and more.

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 Debuts With Added Developer Tools, Security & Automation

    Red Hat, Inc. today announced the general availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1, the latest version of the world's leading enterprise Linux platform. The first minor release of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 enhances the manageability, security and performance of the operating system underpinning the open hybrid cloud while also adding new capabilities to drive developer innovation.

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux is the foundation of Red Hat's open hybrid cloud portfolio, providing the underlying engine that allows complex workloads to be developed and deployed across physical, virtual, private and public cloud environments with greater confidence and control. As the backbone of the hybrid cloud, the world's leading enterprise Linux platform provides a consistent user experience across on premise deployments and all major public cloud infrastructures. At the same time, it supports key production workloads like Microsoft SQL Server and SAP HANA while also enabling new workloads like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine-learning (ML).

Linux on the MAG1 8.9 inch mini-laptop (Ubuntu and Fedora)

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Ubuntu

The Magic Ben MAG1 mini-laptop is a 1.5 pound notebook computer that measures about 8.2″ x 5.8″ x 0.7″ and which features an 8.9 inch touchscreen display and an Intel Core m3-8100Y processor.

As I noted in my MAG1 review, the little computer also has one of the best keyboards I’ve used on a laptop this small and a tiny, but responsive trackpad below the backlit keyboard.

Available from GeekBuying for $630 and up, the MAG1 ships with Windows 10, but it’s also one of the most Linux-friendly mini-laptops I’ve tested to date.

[...]

I did not install either operating system to local storage, so I cannot comment on sleep, battery life, fingerprint authentication, or other features that you’d only be able to truly test by fully installing Ubuntu, Fedora, or another GNU/Linux-based operating system. But running from a liveUSB is a good way to kick the tires and see if there are any obvious pain points before installing an operating system, and for the most part the two operating systems I tested look good to go.

Booting from a flash drive is also pretty easy. Once you’ve prepared a bootable drive using Rufus, UNetbootin, or a similar tool, just plug it into the computer’s USB port, hit the Esc key during startup to bring up the UEFI/SETUP utility.

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Also: Top 10 technical skills that will get you hired in 2020

Red Hat: Ceph Storage, RHEL, OpenShift and More

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Red Hat
  • Comparing Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.3 BlueStore/Beast performance with Red Hat Ceph Storage 2.0 Filestore/Civetweb

    This post is the sequel to the object storage performance testing we did two years back based on Red Hat Ceph Storage 2.0 FileStore OSD backend and Civetweb RGW frontend. In this post, we will compare the performance of the latest available (at the time of writing) Ceph Storage i.e. version 3.3 (BlueStore OSD backend & Beast RGW frontend) with Ceph Storage 2.0 version (mid-2017) (FileStore OSD backend & Civetweb RGW frontend).

    We are conscious that results from both these performance studies are not scientifically comparable. However, we believe that comparing the two should provide you significant performance insights and enables you to make an informed decision when it comes to architecting your Ceph storage clusters.

    As expected, Ceph Storage 3.3 outperformed Ceph Storage 2.0 for all the workloads that we have tested. We believe that Ceph Storage 3.3 performance improvements are attributed to the combination of several things. The BlueStore OSD backend, the Beast web frontend for RGW, the use of Intel Optane SSDs for BlueStore WAL, block.db, and the latest generation Intel Cascade Lake processors.

  • Red Hat: Leading the enterprise Linux server market

    Red Hat has long believed that the operating system should do more than simply exist as part of a technology stack; it should be the catalyst for innovation. Underpinning almost every enterprise IT advancement, from cloud services and Kubernetes to containers and serverless, is the operating system; frequently, this operating system is Linux. Red Hat is proud of the leadership position we have long maintained in the enterprise operating system market, providing the Linux foundation to drive enterprise IT innovation forward.

    Today, we’re pleased to continue this leadership, with a new report from IDC that includes data showing that Red Hat as the leading choice for paid Linux in the worldwide server operating environment market as well as a powerful player in server operating systems at-large.

    According to the report, "Worldwide Server Operating Environments Market Shares, 2018: Overall Market Growth Accelerates:"

  • Microservices-Based Application Delivery with Citrix and Red Hat OpenShift

    Citrix is thrilled to have recently achieved Red Hat OpenShift Operator Certification (Press Release). This new integration simplifies the deployment and control of the Citrix Application Delivery Controller (ADC) to a few clicks through an easy-to-use Operator.

    Before we dive into how you can use Citrix Operators to speed up implementation and control in OpenShift environments, let me cover the benefits of using the Citrix Cloud Native Stack and how it solves the challenges of integrating ingress in Kubernetes.

  • Wavefront Automates and Unifies Red Hat OpenShift Observability, Full Stack

    Red Hat OpenShift is an enterprise Kubernetes platform intended to make the process of developing, deploying and managing cloud-native applications easier, scalable and more flexible. Wavefront by VMware provides enterprise-grade observability and analytics for OpenShift environments across multiple clouds. Wavefront ingests, analyzes and visualizes OpenShift telemetry – metrics, histograms, traces, and span logs – across the full-stack, including distributed applications, containers, microservices, and cloud infrastructure.

    As a result of Wavefront’s collaboration with Red Hat, you can now get automated enterprise observability for OpenShift that’s full stack, through the Red Hat OpenShift Certified Wavefront Operator for OpenShift 4.1 and later. This Operator is available in Operator Hub embedded in OpenShift, a registry for finding Kubernetes Operator-backed services.

  • RHEL 8.1: A minor release with major new container capabilities

    The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 is a minor update to RHEL, but a major step forward with containers. The container-tools:rhel8 application stream has been updated with new versions of Podman, Buildah, Skopeo, runc, container selinux policies and other libraries. The core set of base images in Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) have been updated to 8.1, and UBI has expanded to include Go 1.11.5 as a developer use case. There are now 37 images released as part of UBI - they can all be seen on the UBI product page. Finally, we have released some really good updated documentation covering rootless, and other new features in the container-tools module.

    [...]

    When we launched Red Hat Universal Base Image at Red Hat Summit in 2019, we got a lot of great feedback. One of the first requests we received was for Golang. It is a popular programming language in the Cloud Native space, and we immediately recognized the value of adding it (also, I know what you’re thinking! Stay tuned and you might see OpenJDK images soon).

    With the update to RHEL 8.1, we have added the ubi8/go-toolset container to the UBI family. This gives users the ability to compile Go applications using a pre-packaged container with Go 1.11.5.

  • Red Hat’s CTO sees open-source as driver of choice and consistency in hybrid environments

    A case can certainly be made that Red Hat Inc. and the open-source movement have commoditized portions of the information technology infrastructure. A much wider range of tools and systems are now available to enterprises than ever before.

    This trend is just part of the open-source journey, one that Chris Wright (pictured), as the senior vice president and chief technology officer of Red Hat and a veteran Linux developer, has seen evolve over more than 20 years as a software engineer.

    “What we’re experiencing in the Linux space is, it’s driving a commoditization of infrastructure,” Wright said. “It’s switching away from the traditional vertically integrated stack of a [reduced instruction set computer]/Unix environment to providing choice. As infrastructure changes, it’s not just hardware, it’s virtualized data centers, it’s public clouds.”

  • Introduction to the Red Hat OpenShift deployment extension for Microsoft Azure DevOps

Fedora: End of Life (EOL), RPMs of PHP and Heroes of Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Fedora 29 Officially Reached End of Life (EOL) on November 26th 2019

    Fedora 29 has officially reached End of Life (EOL) effective on November 26th 2019.

    Users are advised to upgrade the latest release of Fedora 30 or Fedora 31, which was released on October 29, 2019.

    It’s a good time to upgrade your system as this EOL version repositories won’t be get any updates from the Fedora community.

    I mean to say, no updates will be pushed to any of the Fedora 29 repositories going forward such as security, bugfix, or enhancement updates.

    Also, they won’t add anymore new packages to Fedora 29 repositories.

    It means, we shouldn’t run EOL operating system because we won’t be getting any benefits from the community.

    It’s very risk and leads to face some security related issues when we run the EOL operating system.

  • PHP version 7.2.26RC1 and 7.3.13RC1

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.13RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.26RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F31 Final

    Hello fellow testers, welcome to the Fedora 31 Final installation of Heroes of Fedora! In this post, we’ll look at the stats concerning the testing of Fedora 31 Final. The purpose of Heroes of Fedora is to provide a summation of testing activity on each milestone release of Fedora. Without community support, Fedora would not exist, so thank you to all who contributed to this release! Without further ado, let’s get started!

Red Hat: State of syslog-ng on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8, AMQ Streams and More

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Red Hat
  • Peter Czanik: State of syslog-ng on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8

    Version 3.23.1 of syslog-ng is now available in EPEL 8. EPEL stands for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux, a repository for RHEL (and CentOS) containing packages not available in RHEL. The packages in the repository are maintained by Fedora package maintainers, not Red Hat, but thanks to their high-quality standards, packages from this repository are often used even by companies, which otherwise do not allow 3rd party repositories.

    As you can see, EPEL 8 does not use the latest available syslog-ng version, but the one available at the time EPEL 8 was created. This means that EPEL 8 will likely contain syslog-ng 3.23.1 forever, that is, until EPEL 8 is EoL. There are rumors, however, that once a new RHEL minor version is available, you will be able to upgrade the syslog-ng package in EPEL.

    The syslog-ng package in EPEL 8 is missing a few features due to missing dependencies. These include all the Java-based destination drivers (HDFS, Elasticsearch, Kafka). Elasticsearch is now also supported by the HTTP destination of syslog-ng. There is a C-based Kafka destination driver in syslog-ng, but as librdkafka is too old in RHEL, it is also unavailable in EPEL.

  • Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 1

    Red Hat AMQ Streams is an enterprise-grade Apache Kafka (event streaming) solution, which enables systems to exchange data at high throughput and low latency. AMQ Streams is available as part of the Red Hat AMQ offering in two different flavors: one on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux platform and another on the OpenShift Container Platform. In this three-part article series, we will cover AMQ Streams on the OpenShift Container Platform.

    To get the most out of these articles, it will help to be familiar with messaging concepts, Red Hat OpenShift, and Kubernetes.

  • Taking The PCI Express To Malleable Systems

    It took decades for server virtualization to go mainstream, making their way from hardware and software partitions on mainframes three decades ago down to proprietary and Unix systems two decades ago to X86 servers with VMware, XenServer, Microsoft, and Red Hat all doing their part. We are at the very front end of a different kind of server virtualization now, comprised of disaggregation and composability, and hopefully this time around it will not take three decades to mainstream it.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and CentOS 7 Receive Important Kernel Security Update

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Red Hat
Security

Marked by Red Hat Product Security as having a security impact of "Important," the new Linux kernel security update is here to patch two vulnerabilities, namely CVE-2019-14821, an out-of-bounds memory access issue via MMIO ring buffer discovered in Linux kernel's KVM hypervisor, and CVE-2019-15239, a flaw that could allow a local attacker to trigger multiple use-after-free conditions, which may lead to a kernel crash or potentially in privilege escalation.

Additionally, the kernel update also addresses several bugs, including missing SCSI VPD information for NVMe drives that breaks InfoScale, NULL pointer dereference at check_preempt_wakeup+0x109, panic in pick_next_task_rt, "Detected Tx Unit Hang" error with adapter reset, broken load balancing over VF LAG configuration, security issues on crypto vmx driver, XFS hangs on acquiring xfs_buf semaphore, single CPU VM hangs during open_posix_testsuite, and many others.

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