Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat

Fedora: End of Life (EOL), RPMs of PHP and Heroes of Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 29 Officially Reached End of Life (EOL) on November 26th 2019

    Fedora 29 has officially reached End of Life (EOL) effective on November 26th 2019.

    Users are advised to upgrade the latest release of Fedora 30 or Fedora 31, which was released on October 29, 2019.

    It’s a good time to upgrade your system as this EOL version repositories won’t be get any updates from the Fedora community.

    I mean to say, no updates will be pushed to any of the Fedora 29 repositories going forward such as security, bugfix, or enhancement updates.

    Also, they won’t add anymore new packages to Fedora 29 repositories.

    It means, we shouldn’t run EOL operating system because we won’t be getting any benefits from the community.

    It’s very risk and leads to face some security related issues when we run the EOL operating system.

  • PHP version 7.2.26RC1 and 7.3.13RC1

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.13RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 29 and Enterprise Linux.

    RPM of PHP version 7.2.26RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F31 Final

    Hello fellow testers, welcome to the Fedora 31 Final installation of Heroes of Fedora! In this post, we’ll look at the stats concerning the testing of Fedora 31 Final. The purpose of Heroes of Fedora is to provide a summation of testing activity on each milestone release of Fedora. Without community support, Fedora would not exist, so thank you to all who contributed to this release! Without further ado, let’s get started!

Red Hat: State of syslog-ng on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8, AMQ Streams and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Peter Czanik: State of syslog-ng on RHEL 8 / CentOS 8

    Version 3.23.1 of syslog-ng is now available in EPEL 8. EPEL stands for Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux, a repository for RHEL (and CentOS) containing packages not available in RHEL. The packages in the repository are maintained by Fedora package maintainers, not Red Hat, but thanks to their high-quality standards, packages from this repository are often used even by companies, which otherwise do not allow 3rd party repositories.

    As you can see, EPEL 8 does not use the latest available syslog-ng version, but the one available at the time EPEL 8 was created. This means that EPEL 8 will likely contain syslog-ng 3.23.1 forever, that is, until EPEL 8 is EoL. There are rumors, however, that once a new RHEL minor version is available, you will be able to upgrade the syslog-ng package in EPEL.

    The syslog-ng package in EPEL 8 is missing a few features due to missing dependencies. These include all the Java-based destination drivers (HDFS, Elasticsearch, Kafka). Elasticsearch is now also supported by the HTTP destination of syslog-ng. There is a C-based Kafka destination driver in syslog-ng, but as librdkafka is too old in RHEL, it is also unavailable in EPEL.

  • Understanding Red Hat AMQ Streams components for OpenShift and Kubernetes: Part 1

    Red Hat AMQ Streams is an enterprise-grade Apache Kafka (event streaming) solution, which enables systems to exchange data at high throughput and low latency. AMQ Streams is available as part of the Red Hat AMQ offering in two different flavors: one on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux platform and another on the OpenShift Container Platform. In this three-part article series, we will cover AMQ Streams on the OpenShift Container Platform.

    To get the most out of these articles, it will help to be familiar with messaging concepts, Red Hat OpenShift, and Kubernetes.

  • Taking The PCI Express To Malleable Systems

    It took decades for server virtualization to go mainstream, making their way from hardware and software partitions on mainframes three decades ago down to proprietary and Unix systems two decades ago to X86 servers with VMware, XenServer, Microsoft, and Red Hat all doing their part. We are at the very front end of a different kind of server virtualization now, comprised of disaggregation and composability, and hopefully this time around it will not take three decades to mainstream it.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 and CentOS 7 Receive Important Kernel Security Update

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Marked by Red Hat Product Security as having a security impact of "Important," the new Linux kernel security update is here to patch two vulnerabilities, namely CVE-2019-14821, an out-of-bounds memory access issue via MMIO ring buffer discovered in Linux kernel's KVM hypervisor, and CVE-2019-15239, a flaw that could allow a local attacker to trigger multiple use-after-free conditions, which may lead to a kernel crash or potentially in privilege escalation.

Additionally, the kernel update also addresses several bugs, including missing SCSI VPD information for NVMe drives that breaks InfoScale, NULL pointer dereference at check_preempt_wakeup+0x109, panic in pick_next_task_rt, "Detected Tx Unit Hang" error with adapter reset, broken load balancing over VF LAG configuration, security issues on crypto vmx driver, XFS hangs on acquiring xfs_buf semaphore, single CPU VM hangs during open_posix_testsuite, and many others.

Read more

Fedora Desktops – Memory Footprints

Filed under
Red Hat

There are over 40 desktops in Fedora. Each desktop has it’s own strengths and weaknesses. Usually picking a desktop is a very personal preference based on features, looks, and other qualities. Sometimes, what you pick for a desktop is limited by hardware constraints.

This article is to help people compare Fedora desktops based on the desktop baseline memory. To narrow the scope, we are only looking at the desktops that have an official Fedora Live image.

Read more

Fedora and Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Event Report: CCOSS’19

    CCOSS stands for “Cumbre de Contribuidores de Open Source Software” (Contributors Summit in Open Source Software). It is the first event in Mexico dedicated to improving accessibility for latin tech practitioners to contribute to world-leading open source technologies, focusing on delivering content in Spanish & providing hands-on mentoring opportunities.

  • Latinoware 2019

    In its 16th edition, Latinoware started on Wednesday (27) and continued until Friday (29), with a program of over 300 activities. The Latin American Congress of Free Software and Open Technologies at the Rafain Palace Hotel & Convention, in Foz do Iguaçu, attracted over 2700 of participants, including children, students, professionals and even older people, interested in the different topics addressed.

  • APIs as a Product: Get started in no time

    In the previous article, APIs as a Product: Get the value out of your APIs, we presented a new approach called “APIs as a Product” to maximize the value of your APIs. In this article, we show how to quickly get started with APIs as a Product using the new features of Red Hat 3scale API Management 2.7.

    To showcase the power of 3scale 2.7’s new features, combined with the awesomeness of the open source communities Apicurio and Microcks, we will design two APIs as a Product and show how we can compose both products in 3scale to get the resulting API as a Product.

    Let’s look at the well-known Petstore example. Imagine for a moment that the first steps of the API Design Thinking process led to this rough definition of the customer’s needs:

  • Kubernetes reality check: 3 takeaways from KubeCon

    Well over half the attendees were conference first-timers. On the one hand, lots of new blood is a sign of a healthy community. On the other hand… well, I’ll let one such first-timer, consultant and industry analyst Keith Townsend, speak for himself: “I’m not shy in saying I don’t know what’s going on at this keynote. It’s not aimed at me or people like me for sure. To use a metaphor - it feels like I’ve been dropped in the middle of an industry conference like the American Medical Association. There are some words and concepts I understand, but overall I’m lost. And there are very few IT topics,” he noted on Twitter.

    Enterprise distributions can help to abstract away some of this complexity by making opinionated choices about components and otherwise packaging the cloud-native ecosystem into a more consumable form.

  • Testing in production: From DevTestOops to DevTestOps

    DevNation tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about testing in production from Alex Soto, Red Hat Software Engineer.

    DevOps has grown in popularity in recent years, particularly in software companies that want to reduce lead time to be measured in days/weeks instead of months/years. To make sure your software does the right things and does those things right, you need to test it implacably. Many companies, however, see the testing phase as a bottleneck that slows product release. To change that, we need a new approach — making the release process of an application a testing process and involving QA from the beginning.

  • Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2: New tools to speed Kubernetes development

    We are pleased to announce the release of Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces 2.0. Based on Eclipse Che, its upstream project CodeReady Workspaces is a Red Hat OpenShift-native developer environment enabling cloud-native development for developer teams.

  • What we risk when we open up to customers (and why it's worth it)

    Customer empowerment is one consequence of digital transformation. And as we explained in the first part of this series, it's a powerful one. Empowering customers can deepen their relationship with your organization—but it won't work if they don't trust you.

    In this article, we'll explain how acting openly can create that foundation of trust—and why it can lead to business success.

  • Blockchain in 2020: 5 trends to watch

    If you’re looking for a one-word summary of corporate blockchain efforts in 2019, try “experimentation.” The hype is subsiding and more businesses are actively trying to figure out how they can actually use the technology to their benefit.

    “2019 has continued what 2018 started – enterprises experimenting,” says George Spasov, blockchain architect and co-founder at LimeChain. “The finger-dipping exercises of the last year have encouraged further experimentation this year, while dragging along new experimenters.”

  • IT burnout: A personal story

    I really didn't notice it taking a toll on me at the time but, looking back, I started showing symptoms of burnout fairly early. However, it was easy to push aside with the excitement of moving to new roles with increasing responsibility and continuing my aggressive pursuit of learning. Before I knew it, several years had passed and I was officially burnt out.

    "Burnout" isn't just being bored or tired at your job; it's a serious issue with real consequences. The Mayo Clinic defines burnout as "a special type of work-related stress — a state of physical or emotional exhaustion that also involves a sense of reduced accomplishment and loss of personal identity."

    While burnout is not an official medical diagnosis, it goes hand in hand with underlying medical conditions such as depression and anxiety, which could make symptoms worse.

    I wasn't officially diagnosed with clinical depression until 2012 but I've been dealing with it my entire life (and by "dealing with it," I mean completely ignoring it, which I do not recommend.) It wasn't until I started taking medication and seeing a therapist that I realized how much burnout was affecting my everyday life.

Red Hat: Eclipse MicroProfile, APIs, Customer Portal and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • New Eclipse MicroProfile book provides introduction to enterprise Java microservices

    Fellow Red Hat associates Cesar Saavedra, Pavol Loffay, Jeff Mesnil, Antoine Sabot-Durand, Scott Stark, and I have written a book on Eclipse MicroProfile, called Hands-On Enterprise Java Microservices with Eclipse MicroProfile.

    This 256-page book provides an introduction to microservices and why they are important, and it showcases Eclipse MicroProfile as a way to implement so-called 12-factor apps.

  • APIs as a Product: Get the value out of your APIs

    APIs continue to spread, as seen in this 2019 report from ProgrammableWeb, which shows a 30% increase over last year’s growth rate. More regulations are enforcing the use of APIs to open up companies and foster innovation. Think of the Payment Services Directive version two (PSD2), open banking, and the public sector releasing 0pen data APIs. With such an abundance of APIs, it becomes increasingly crucial to get the value out of your APIs and differentiate yourself from the growing competition. It’s time to design and manage your APIs as a Product.

  • Did you know that Red Hat Enterprise Linux for public clouds has management included?

    To get started with Insights, the first thing you’ll need to do is create a Red Hat customer portal login if you don’t already have one using these instructions. This will give you access to the Red Hat Customer Portal and cloud.redhat.com which includes the Insights dashboard. Next, use the Getting Started page to enable the Insights client.

  • Registration for Red Hat Summit 2020 now open!

    One of the most exciting days of the year is finally here. Registration for Red Hat Summit 2020 is now open!

    We’re heading back to San Francisco and the Moscone Center on April 27-29, 2020, where we expect thousands of customers, partners and technology industry leaders from around the world to come together for a high-energy week of innovation, education and collaboration.

    [...]

    For the past 15 years, Red Hat Summit has delivered inspirational, educational and actionable content, industry-shaping news, and insight into best practices from customers and partners from around the world and across industries. Attendees also have the chance to talk to the teams who produce the technologies they depend on, and learn more about Red Hat’s product roadmap.

  • Data science, orchestration, and more Ansible news

    November's wander-around-the-web has turned up some interesting Ansible stories. It's fascinating to explore Ansible development through data, as Greg Sutcliffe does in his blog linked below. On the YouTubes this month, we found a couple of really interesting talks.

CentOS 8 Stream - the distro streampunk

Filed under
Red Hat

CentOS 8 Stream looks like a nice, smart project. Whether it's going to grant the intended users, i.e. not desktop folks, the necessary levels of flexibility and stability and modernity, well, time shall tell. But it is a sensible idea, because at the moment, the choice is one between austerity and unpredictability.

I am testing from the desktop angle, so the considerations are definitely different - and the benefits smaller if any. But then, I'm thinking. Could I perhaps commit this to some production or semi-production desktop machine, and see whether it offers long-term value? In general, I don't like the concept of using third-party repositories on systems used for serious work, but I'm tempted enough to see how well this pans out. Hm, we shall see. The end, cliffhanger style.

Read more

Kubernetes, IBM and Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

Red Hat, IBM and SUSE

Filed under
Red Hat
SUSE
  • Raytheon Leans on Red Hat to Advance DevSecOps

    Jon Check, senior director for cyber protection solutions for Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services, said Raytheon has developed a set of DevSecOps practices for organizations building applications deployed in highly secure environments, involving government contracts.

    Raytheon and these customers have been challenged by a chronic shortage of IT professionals with the appropriate level of clearance to work on these classified projects. To overcome that issue, Check said Raytheon developed what it describes as a “code low, deploy high” approach to DevSecOps. Developers who lack security clearances can still build applications; however, those applications can only be deployed by IT professionals having the appropriate security clearance.

    In addition, Check said Raytheon has developed integrations between its DevSecOps framework and various IT tools based on the ITIL framework, which so many IT operations teams depend on to foster collaboration across the application development and deployment process. For example, he said, whenever code gets checked into a repository, an alert can be sent to an IT service management application from ServiceNow.

  •                    

  • [Older] IBM: ‘Mac users are happier and more productive’ [iophk: duh]

                         

                           

    IBM CIO Fletcher Previn talked up fresh IBM findings that show those of its employees who use Macs are more likely to stay with IBM and exceed performance expectations compared to [Windows] users.

  •                    

  • [Older] IBM: Mac users perform better at work and close larger high-value sales compared to [Windows] users

                         

                           

    Today, IBM announced some major news showing the benefits of using a Mac over a [Windows machine] at work. According to IBM research, there are 22% more macOS users who exceed expectations in performance reviews compared to Windows users. High-value sales deals also tend to be 16% higher for Mac users compared to [Windows] users.

  •                    

  • [Older] IBM: Our Mac-Using Employees Outperform Windows Users in Every Way

                         

                           

    According to IBM, one staff member can support 5,400 Mac users, while the company needed one staff member per 242 [Windows] users. Only 5 percent of Mac users called the help desk for assistance, compared with 40 percent of [Windows] users. This Mac-IBM love affair has been ongoing for a few years, and the same IBM PR points out that in 2016, IBM CIO Fletcher Previn declared that IBM saves anywhere from $273 to $543 when its end users choose Mac over [Windows].

  • Centiq receives highest SUSE Solution Partner certification to bolster best-in-class enterprise cloud application migration and implementation expertise for SAP projects
  • Noop now named none

    Lately more and more people approached me with saptune warnings regarding ‘noop’ being an invalid scheduler.
    With new Servie Packs we see a transition from non-multiqueue schedulers (noop, cfq, deadline) to multiqueue schedulers (none, mq-deadline, bfq, kyber).
    This transition will be finished with kernel 5.x (SLES 15 SP2). Only multiqueue schedulers will remain.
    Even if you do not have upgraded lately, new hardware like NVMe’s can come with multiqueue support only.

Toolbox on Fedora and Red Hat's OpenStack

Filed under
Red Hat
  • A quick introduction to Toolbox on Fedora

    Toolbox allows you to sort and manage your development environments in containers without requiring root privileges or manually attaching volumes. It creates a container where you can install your own CLI tools, without installing them on the base system itself. You can also utilize it when you do not have root access or cannot install programs directly. This article gives you an introduction to toolbox and what it does.

  • YJFX Adopts Red Hat OpenStack Platform to Build Out Customer Service Infrastructure

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that YJFX, Inc., a financial subsidiary of Yahoo Group focused on foreign exchange services, has adopted Red Hat OpenStack Platform to build out the company’s private cloud infrastructure. Red Hat’s massively scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) offering, Red Hat OpenStack Platform offers YJFX extensive scalability, helping it deliver new infrastructure more quickly as it seeks to bring differentiating applications and services to end users.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

SUSE/OpenSUSE: SUSE Doc Day at SUSECON 2020, OpenSUSE Board Election and More

  • Yes We Do it Again: SUSE Doc Day at SUSECON 2020

    A Doc Day is a time when a group of people gathers to collaborate on writing documentation on one or more given topics. The main premise for our Doc Day is to get a group of interested people – YOU – in a room together and have you work towards shared goals. To help you feel more comfortable, we will give a short overview of our documentation, how we usually work, and how you can contribute. Of course, you cannot write entire manuals or guides in one single day. But you can help us to improve existing documentation by reviewing, editing and updating it. In addition, we will use the Doc Day to kick-off the creation of new guides and papers for topics that you think are not yet covered (well enough).

  • openSUSE Board election 2019-2020 – Call for Nominations, Applications

    Two seats are open for election on the openSUSE Board. Gertjan Lettink completed his second term. Simon Lees completed his first term and thus he is eligible to run as a Board candidate again should he wish to do so.

  • status.opensuse.org updated

    Our infrastructure status page at https://status.opensue.org/ is using Cachet under the hood. While the latest update brought a couple of bugfixes it also deprecated the RSS and Atom feeds, that could be used to integrate the information easily in other applications. While we are somehow sad to see such a feature go, we also have to admit that the decision of the developers is not really bad - as the generation of those feeds had some problems (bugs) in the old Cachet versions. Instead of fixing them, the developers decided to move on and focus on other areas. So it's understandable that they cut off something, which is not in their focus, to save resources.

  • SSL cipher updates

    Sometimes it's a good idea to follow best practices. This is what we did by following the recommendations for "general-purpose servers with a variety of clients, recommended for almost all systems" from https://ssl-config.mozilla.org/.

qBittorrent 4.2.0 Adds Support For Libtorrent 1.2, New Features

qBittorrent 4.2.0 was released recently featuring support for libtorrent 1.2, some minor new features, as well as WebUI updates. qBittorrent is a free and open source BitTorrent client for Windows, macOS, OS/2, Linux and FreeBSD, written in C++ (Qt) and Python (for its optional search engine). It comes with a Qt GUI, but it can also be used on a headless server, without requiring the X window system -- in both GUI and headless mode you can remote control it through its web user interface. The application comes with pretty much everything you'd need in a BitTorrent client, from sequential downloading and bandwidth scheduling to a torrent creation tool, anonymous mode, integrated search engine, RSS feed reader and downloader with advanced filters, IP filtering, and of course support for DHT, PeX, encrypted connections, LSD, UPnP and NAT-PMP port forwarding support, µTP, magnet links, private torrents and more. Read more

10 skills every Linux system administrator should have

I know what you're saying. You're saying, "Oh, great, someone else telling me that I need soft skills." Yes, that's what I'm telling you. Honing your interviewing skills can not only determine if you get a particular job, it can also be a major factor in the salary you get. It's true. Let's say, for example, that the salary range for a mid-level SA job is $56k to $85k per year. You might be fully qualified for the top of the range, but the company offers you $70k instead and mentions some nonsense about growth potential or they tell you that they'll bring you along when the time is right. You need to practice answering questions. Answer the question that's asked. Don't give so much information that you see eyes glazing over, but giving answers that are too short will make you appear arrogant or flippant. Give enough examples of your work to let the interviewer(s) know that you know what you're talking about. They can ask for more details if they want to. You have to learn to watch other people's behaviors. Are they listening to you? Are they focused on you and the interview? Do they look as though you haven't said enough when you pause to allow them to speak or ask another question? Watch and learn. Practice with other system administrators in your group. Do mock interviews with the group. I know it might sound silly, but it's important to be able to speak to other people about what you do. This practice can also be good for you in speaking with managers. Don't get too deep into the weeds with non-technical people. Keep your answers concise and friendly, and offer examples to illustrate your points. Read more

Games: Ciel Fledge, Slender Threads, XO and More

  • Ciel Fledge, an intriguing post-apocalypse daughter raising sim releases next year

    It's 3716 and most of humanity lives on the floating city, ARK-3, to get away from a colossal alien threat that almost caused our extinction. Amongst all the chaos, a mysterious young girl is found and that's where you come in. Ciel Fledge is a game about raising an adopted daughter in a future world that still has hope. One we took a look at some time ago and it finally has a release date. Studio Namaapa and PQube Limited have announced it's releasing on February 21, 2020.

  • Slender Threads, a new point & click adventure thriller announced

    From the developer behind the rather amusing Nobodies and Kelvin and the Infamous Machine, Blyts just announced their new adventure thriller Slender Threads. In Slender Threads you will guide the protagonist, Harvey Green, an unremarkable travelling salesman through the scenic yet empty community of Villa Ventana. While nefarious, unseen forces exert increasingly more sway over him and the town's residents.

  • Retro styled strategic fleet defence game XO has entered Early Access

    In the space strategy game XO, you take command of the last remaining Battleship as you attempt to gather a fleet in a desperate bid to save humanity. Sound a bit like Battlestar Galactica? Well, it should. The team said they were actually inspired by Battlestar Galactica, The Lost Fleet series, and games like FTL. Jumpdrive Studios ran a successful Kickstarter campaign for it back in 2015, so it's been a while in the making.

  • Add jumping to your Python platformer game

    In the previous article in this series, you simulated gravity, but now you need to give your player a way to fight against gravity by jumping. A jump is a temporary reprieve from gravity. For a few moments, you jump up instead of falling down, the way gravity is pulling you. But once you hit the peak of your jump, gravity kicks in again and pulls you back down to earth. In code, this translates to variables. First, you must establish variables for the player sprite so that Python can track whether or not the sprite is jumping. Once the player sprite is jumping, then gravity is applied to the player sprite again, pulling it back down to the nearest object.

  • Trip the Ark Fantastic, a colourful story-driven adventure set in the Animal Kingdom announced

    An adventure through the Animal Kingdom in Trip the Ark Fantastic, announced today from Croatian developer Gamechuck. It's a story-driven adventure game set in the Animal Kingdom on the verge of both industrial and social revolution. It seems to put a new spin on the story of Noah's Ark, except this time the ancient myth here is that the ark was built by lions millennia ago to save all animals from a great flood. The story follows Charles, a hedgehog scholar on a mission by the lion king to save the monarchy, but his decisions could end up helping reformists or even to bring about anarchy.