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Red Hat

Fedora 31 Won't Add An Official POWER Desktop Spin

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Red Hat

While Fedora recently began spinning workstation/live images for POWER (PPC64LE) at least as a work-in-progress, it won't be made a formal feature of the upcoming Fedora 31.

Due to the imminent feature deadline and little notice, the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee on Monday rejected the notion of a PPC64LE desktop variant at least for this current (F31) cycle.

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Also: CPE Team at Flock – Post Flock

Server: Decentralisation, SUSE and Red Hat

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Red Hat
Server
SUSE
  • Decentralizing the Data Center: Hybrid Cloud, Multi-Cloud and more

    But how did we get to cloud computing in the first place? While these are not the only reasons, cost, availability and disaster recovery were a large part of what motivated companies to transition from on-prem [-only] deployments to cloud or hybrid approaches. Now, let us fast forward to the present and we are seeing something entirely new: a complete decentralization of the data center.

    But what does that mean? Once upon a time, companies transitioning or starting their operations in the cloud shopped around and found a public cloud service that best suited their needs. The final decision typically boiled down to cost and services. I would know. I used to work in a division of one of these large cloud providers and we were always going neck-to-neck with the other major players for mainly these key topics.

  • Quarks – New Building Blocks for Deploying on Kubernetes

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Mario Manno of SUSE and Enrique Encalada of IBM gave a presentation about two popular platforms for deploying your cloud-native applications – Kubernetes and Cloud Foundry. Kubernetes is the great for its flexibility, control over your application and is a great container orchestrator. Cloud Foundry is the go-to platform where you don’t want to worry about your infrastructure, networking, scaling, and routing. It also has the best developer experience in the industry. With Quarks, deployment is simplified using BOSH features, but keeping the flexibility of Kubernetes. Believing that Quarks is the next buzzword for Cloud Foundry conferences, they described and demonstrated the new framework and its building blocks for deploying cloud-native applications which has the best features of the two worlds.

  • SLE 12 SP5 Release Candidate 2 is out!

    This Service Pack 5 is a consolidation Service Pack release.

  • Red Hat Streamlines Operating System Update Cycle

    CentOS is a distribution of Linux based on a fork of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). The team that oversees CentOS operates independently of Red Hat. That team in collaboration with Red Hat is making available an additional distribution dubbed CentOS Stream, through which a continuous stream of content will be updated several times daily.
    Mike McGrath, senior director for Linux engineering at Red Hat, said those innovations eventually will find their way into RHEL, but until then developers who want to build applications using those features as they become available can use CentOS Stream.
    This latest distribution of Linux from Red Hat is intended to act as a bridge between Fedora, a distribution of Linux through which Red Hat makes available experimental technologies, and RHEL, he said.

  • Happy Halloween (Packages Not In EPEL-8 yet)

    It is October, and in the US it means that all the decorations for Halloween are going up. This is a time of year I love because you get to dress up in a costume and give gifts to people. In the spirit of Halloween, I am going to make various packages available in a COPR to add onto the EPEL-8 repositories.

    There are a lot of packages which are in EPEL-6 or EPEL-7 but are not in EPEL-8 yet. Some of these may not be possible due to missing -devel, others may just need someone interested in maintaining a branch for EPEL-8, etc etc. In order to try and get a push on this I wanted to see what packages could be built and made ready at some point. I also wanted to make it possible that if you really needed this package, that they could be available. 

  • CentOS 8 Stream Install Guide – CentOS 8 Installation Screenshots

WatchData PROXKey digital signature using emSigner in Fedora 30 using emSigner

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Red Hat

Hardware tokens with digital signature are used for filing various financial documents in Govt of India portals. The major tokens supported by eMudhra are WatchData ProxKey, ePass 2003, Aladdin, Safenet, TrustKey etc. Many of these hardware tokens come (in CDROM image mode) with drivers and utilities to manage the signatures, unfortunately only in Windows platform.

Sometime in 2017, I tried to make these tokens work for signing GST returns under GNU/Linux, using the de-facto pcsc tool. I got a WatchData PROXKey, which doesn’t work out-of-the-box with pcsc. Digging further brings up this report and it seems the driver is a spinoff of upstream (LGPL licensed), but no source code made available, so there is no hope of using these hardware tokens with upstream tools. The only option is depending on vendor provided drivers, unfortunately. There are some instructions by a retailer to get this working under Ubuntu.

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IBM, Red Hat and 'Drones for Good' (DroneAid)

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Red Hat
OSS
  • Open Source is the Building Block for Digital Transformation

    According to Damien Wong, Vice President and General Manager, Asian Growth and Emerging Markets, Red Hat, both IBM and Red Hat believe that the multi-cloud approach is the way forward and they aim to become the leading hybrid and multi-cloud provider.
    “Red Hat is still Red Hat. We are true to our principals. We keep our own brand and keep Red Hat developer programs. We remain neutral and independent. And yes, we will compete with IBM.”
    Having said that at a media session during the Red Hat Forum in Kuala Lumpur, Damien added that innovation today needs to be scaled safely. And one of the best ways to that is with open source. By being able to share ideas and innovations, organisations and developers will be able to overcome the challenges of discovery and creation.

    [...]

    “This is a clear endorsement of our strategy being the right one. If you are leading in a race, and no one is chasing you, you’re probably going the wrong direction. But if others are catching up, you are on the right path. This is the right direction and with everyone playing catch up, it’s only a great thing for the community. Participation and robust collaboration among commercial competitors will make it stronger.”

  • TOKAI Group Adopts Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated for Fully-Managed Enterprise Kubernetes

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that TOKAI Group, a group of consolidated subsidiary companies under TOKAI Holdings Corporation, has selected Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated as its overall development and operations infrastructure. With the leading enterprise Kubernetes platform as its primary container platform, TOKAI Group has used the platform to integrate the disparate web applications built by its respective group companies.

  • Submissions Open for 2020 Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year Award

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that submissions are being accepted for the 14th annual Red Hat Certified Professional of the Year Award.

    The Red Hat Certified Professional (RHCP) of the Year Award recognizes the hard work, expertise and ingenuity of a current Red Hat Certified Professional. The award program is open to holders of a current Red Hat certification or Certificate of Expertise in eligible countries. The certification must also be current during the 2020 Red Hat Summit event.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: DroneAid

    This week’s SD Times open-source project of the week is an IBM hackathon winning project that uses visual recognition to detect and count SOS icons on the ground from drone streams overhead to help first responders plot rescue actions. 

    DroneAid was developed by developer Pedro Cruz after he witnessed Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and saw how people in rural areas desperately wrote signs seeking food and water so that planes and helicopters could see their messages. 

    “I thought that drones could be the perfect solution for rapidly assessing damages from the air and they could help with capturing images that could then be processed by AI computer vision systems,” Cruz wrote in a blog post that described the steps that were necessary to complete the project.  

  • Drones for Good: DroneAid Goes OpenSource

    Perhaps one of the most inspiring Drones for Good stories we’ve heard in the last few years is that of Pedro Cruz, a Puerto Rican native who responded to the devastation of 2017’s Hurricane Maria by creating DroneAid, a tool designed to communicate SOS signs on the ground to first responders, during a Call for Code Hackathon.  Now a full-time IBM developer, Pedro Cruz is bringing DroneAid to the open source community – making it available to as many people as possible.

  • Hurricane Maria survivor designs DroneAid open source disaster relief tool

    Pedro Cruz spent weeks after Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico in September 2017 helping bring food and water to people trapped in remote areas. 

    He quickly realized he could use an airborne drone to help, using its video connection to read dozens of messages painted on the ground asking rescue crews to bring water, food or medicine. 

    It wasn’t until nearly a year after the hurricane devastated the island territory in September 2017 that Cruz figured out a way to connect his drone to disaster aid through a computerized visual recognition tool.

CentOS 8 review - Let's toast to the next ten years

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Red Hat
Reviews

Let's see how we wrap this up. If we look at CentOS 8 as it, then it comes with lots of problematic areas, which preclude it from being fun and enjoyable out of the box. The big issue is the ability to manage Gnome extensions, without which the desktop simply isn't usable. But then, if we remember this is a server distro, never intended for desktop use per se, things look quite all right, as there are many dedicated for-home systems that manage much less than this. Don't forget stability and ten years of support.

On top of that, I was actually able to achieve a fair deal, I managed to add new and cool software, multimedia and smartphone support are quite good, and you can depend on this system going forward. Performance is meh, networking can be better, and there should be a simplified mechanism to enable the desktop element. All in all, CentOS 8 deserves something like 7.5/10. After polish and tweaks, a rather nifty 9/10. Plus CentOS 8 is better than its predecessor all around, respect. You should try.

I am going to attempt an in-vivo upgrade. Maybe a Plasma test, too, yes! And CentOS Stream, which might be just what I've been looking my whole life - a rolling-release version of the distro designed to stay modern and relevant even many, many years after the initial release. This could be the magic formula of stability, support and latest software. We shall see. Plus I owe you all those tutorials. Stay tuned.

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Fedora: Features of Fedora 29, Fedora Program Management and How Red Hat/IBM Treats Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Fedora 29 release features

    Fedora is among the most popular Linux distributions so far. Fedora 29 is looking up to be another great release. Fedora is not just a core, but also a workstation and a server . This release has new features which include performance improvements compared to the previous version. In this article, we will discuss the most highlighted features of Fedora 29 workstation.

  • FPgM report: 2019-40

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Understanding Red Hat Linux Price and Pricing

    RHEL was first released in 2000, after the discontinuation of Red Hat Linux. With the new version came a new pricing model and also Fedora Linux, a free, community-supported Linux distribution that functions as the upstream source of RHEL.

    RHEL uses a much more conservative release cycle than Fedora. New features are typically first made available to Fedora users and don’t make it to RHEL until they are polished. While both RHEL and Fedora can be used for commercial purposes, only RHEL receives commercial support.

    “Developers and Linux enthusiasts flock to Fedora for the latest features and the opportunity to directly collaborate with Red Hat engineering,” explains Red Hat on its website. “Banks, stock exchanges, hospitals, and businesses that run the world’s leading websites choose Red Hat Enterprise Linux for the platform’s performance, stability, and security, which lets them implement mature and well-organized IT infrastructures across the enterprise.”

CentOS 8 New Release Overview

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Red Hat

There is just so much to be excited about in CentOS 8 and the addition of CentOS 8 Stream will surely offer a lot of possibilities we haven't even thought of yet. One additional thing worth noting is that the Red Hat documentation for RHEL 8 (which CentOS mostly points users to rather than trying to also produce rebranded documentation) has undergone massive changes. Rather than offering the various guides we have grown accustomed to in the past (like the System Administrators Guide, the Network Guide, the Security Guide, etc), the RHEL 8 documentation is task oriented rather than reference oriented. For example, they have a Configuring basic system settings guide and a Deploying different types of servers guide. I'm guessing that there is probably quite a bit over of overlap in the material between the two styles of documentation but the newer one will take a little getting used to. Those who are completely new to the documentation may prefer the new style.

In any event, I really look forward to using CentOS 8 more and putting it through its paces, seeing how Stream evolves, and enjoying all of the new features a new major release offers. Thanks for all of the hard work Red Hat and CentOS!

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers: CEO Interview, Updates, GNU and Python

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat CEO talks the next chapter of the cloud
  • October 2019: Fedora status updates

    Welcome to the monthly set of updates on key areas within Fedora. This update includes Fedora Council representatives, Fedora Editions, and Fedora Objectives. The content here is based on the weekly updates submitted to the Fedora Council, published to the project dashboard.

    [...]

    In the past month, the Minimization team brought the “feedback pipeline” to life. Feedback Pipeline gives a quick overview of the use cases we’re targeting to minimize. It shows required packages, their dependencies, the overall size, and allows a deeper inspection with interactive dependency graphs. As part of that work, the team is working on identifying use cases to target.

    The Council approved the Minimization objective on a short-term basis. Adam Šamalík will be submitting a proposal for the next phase of this objective to the Council soon.

  • Fedora Update Weeks 35–38

    It’s been quite some time since the last update, but things have been rather calm. There’s been the usual round of updated packages, and a few new dependencies. Otherwise, there’s not been anything out of the ordinary.

  • Fedora 32 Planning To Ship With GNU Binutils 2.33

    Not particularly surprising considering Fedora tends to always ship with a bleeding-edge toolchain, but for their Fedora 32 release to kick off 2020 they are planning for GNU Binutils 2.33.

    Binutils 2.33 hasn't been released yet but is branched and will be released with plenty of time to make it into Fedora 32, which isn't due until the end of April.

  • gcc under the hood

    My background in computers is a bit hacky for a compiler engineer. I never had the theoretical computer science base that the average compiler geek does (yes I have a Masters in Computer Applications, but it’s from India and yes I’m going to leave that hanging without explanation) and I have pretty much winged it all these years. What follows is a bunch of thoughts (high five to those who get that reference!) from my winging it for almost a decade with the GNU toolchain. If you’re a visual learner then I would recommend watching my talk video at Linaro Connect 2019 instead of reading this. This is an imprecise transcript of my talk, with less silly quips and in a more neutral accent.

  • Fedora 30 : A general intro to linux signals with python.

In Fedora 31, 32-bit i686 is 86ed

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Red Hat

The release of Fedora 31 drops the 32-bit i686 kernel, and as a result bootable images. While there may be users out there who still have hardware which will not work with the 64-bit x86_64 kernel, there are very few. However, this article gives you the whole story behind the change, and what 32-bit material you’ll still find in Fedora 31.

The i686 architecture essentially entered community support with the Fedora 27 release. Unfortunately, there are not enough members of the community willing to do the work to maintain the architecture. Don’t worry, though — Fedora is not dropping all 32-bit packages. Many i686 packages are still being built to ensure things like multilib, wine, and Steam will continue to work.

While the repositories are no longer being composed and mirrored out, there is a koji i686 repository which works with mock for building 32-bit packages, and in a pinch to install 32-bit versions which are not part of the x86_64 multilib repository. Of course, maintainers expect this will see limited use. Users who simply need to run a 32-bit application should be able to do so with multilib on a 64-bit system.

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Red Hat and Fedora: Apache Kafka Streams, AMQ Streams, Flatpak and Google Code-in 2019

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Red Hat
  • DevNation Live Bengaluru: Apache Kafka Streams and event-driven architecture

    Our first DevNation Live regional event was held in Bengaluru, India in July. This free technology event focused on open source innovations, with sessions presented by elite Red Hat technologists.

    This tutorial, presented by Edson Yanaga, dives into events, message-oriented middleware, Apache Kafka, data streaming, and analytics to explain the fundamentals for creating a distributed, resilient, and scalable application.

    Once you understand events, messaging becomes an essential asset in your toolbox. Using an event-driven architecture on top of a message-driven architecture helps you unleash the benefits of distributed computing.

  • Deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams and Fuse on OpenShift Container Platform 4

    In the following video, I demonstrate how to deploy Red Hat AMQ Streams (based on upstream Apache Kafka) on OpenShift 4.

    I will also demonstrate how to use AMQ Streams in a basic way using Red Hat Fuse. There is a Camel route exposing a REST endpoint at /goodbye, which—when hit—sends a “Goodbye World” message to the topic. There is also a timer sending “Hello World” messages periodically to the topic. A separate Camel route consumes from the topic and logs the messages for our visibility.

  • Some Flatpak updates

    In 1.4.2, Flatpak gained the ability to use extra-data for extensions. This mechanism has been around for applications for a long time, but it is a new feature for extensions.

    The 19.08 version of the freedesktop runtime uses it for its new org.freedesktop.Platform.openh264 extension, which uses the Cisco openh264 builds.

    Since we are taking the ‘run everywhere’ aspect of Flatpak seriously, we’ve backported this feature from the 1.4 branch to older stable branches and released 1.2.4 and 1.0.9, so even users on very stable distributions can enjoy this new feature.

  • Calling Mentors for Google Code-in 2019

    Google Code-in (GCI) is an annual programming competition hosted by Google Inc. that allows pre-university students to complete tasks specified by various, partnering open source organizations. The contest was originally the Google Highly Open Participation Contest, but in 2010, the format was modified into its current state. Students that complete tasks win certificates and T-shirts. Each organization also selects two grand prize award winners who will earn a trip to Google’s Headquarters located in Mountain View, California.

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More in Tux Machines

RedisInsight Revealed and WordPress 5.2.4 Released

  • Redis Labs eases database management with RedisInsight

    The robust market of tools to help users of the Redis database manage their systems just got a new entrant. Redis Labs disclosed the availability of its RedisInsight tool, a graphical user interface (GUI) for database management and operations. Redis is a popular open source NoSQL database that is also increasingly being used in cloud-native Kubernetes deployments as users move workloads to the cloud. Open source database use is growing quickly according to recent reports as the need for flexible, open systems to meet different needs has become a common requirement. Among the challenges often associated with databases of any type is ease of management, which Redis is trying to address with RedisInsight.

  • WordPress 5.2.4 Update

    Late-breaking news on the 5.2.4 short-cycle security release that landed October 14. When we released the news post, I inadvertently missed giving props to Simon Scannell of RIPS Technologies for finding and disclosing an issue where path traversal can lead to remote code execution. Simon has done a great deal of work on the WordPress project, and failing to mention his contributions is a huge oversight on our end. Thank you to all of the reporters for privately disclosing vulnerabilities, which gave us time to fix them before WordPress sites could be attacked.

Desktop GNU/Linux: Rick and Morty, Georges Basile Stavracas Neto on GNOME and Linux Format on Eoan Ermine

  • We know where Rick (from Rick and Morty) stands on Intel vs AMD debate

    For one, it appears Rick is running a version of Debian with a very old Linux kernel (3.2.0) — one dating back to 2012. He badly needs to install some frickin’ updates. “Also his partitions are real weird. It’s all Microsoft based partitions,” a Redditor says. “A Linux user would never do [this] unless they were insane since NTFS/Exfat drivers on Linux are not great.”

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Every shell has a story

    … a wise someone once muttered while walking on a beach, as they picked up a shell lying on the sand. Indeed, every shell began somewhere, crossed a unique path with different goals and driven by different motivations. Some shells were created to optimize for mobility; some, for lightness; some, for speed; some were created to just fit whoever is using it and do their jobs efficiently. It’s statistically close to impossible to not find a suitable shell, one could argue. So, is this a blog about muttered shell wisdom? In some way, it actually is. It is, indeed, about Shell, and about Mutter. And even though “wisdom” is perhaps a bit of an overstatement, it is expected that whoever reads this blog doesn’t leave it less wise, so the word applies to a certain degree. Evidently, the Shell in question is composed of bits and bytes; its protection is more about the complexities of a kernel and command lines than sea predators, and the Mutter is actually more about compositing the desktop than barely audible uttering.

  • Adieu, 32

    The tenth month of the year arrives and so does a new Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) update. Is it a portent that this is the 31st release of Ubuntu and with the 32nd release next year, 32-bit x86 Ubuntu builds will end?

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

  • Linux's Crypto API Is Adopting Some Aspects Of Zinc, Opening Door To Mainline WireGuard

    Mainlining of the WireGuard secure VPN tunnel was being held up by its use of the new "Zinc" crypto API developed in conjunction with this network tech. But with obstacles in getting Zinc merged, WireGuard was going to be resorting to targeting the existing kernel crypto interfaces. Instead, however, it turns out the upstream Linux crypto developers were interested and willing to incorporate some elements of Zinc into the existing kernel crypto implementation. Back in September is when Jason Donenfeld decided porting WireGuard to the existing Linux crypto API was the best path forward for getting this secure networking functionality into the mainline kernel in a timely manner. But since then other upstream kernel developers working on the crypto subsystem ended up with patches incorporating some elements of Zinc's design.

  • zswap: use B-tree for search
    The current zswap implementation uses red-black trees to store
    entries and to perform lookups. Although this algorithm obviously
    has complexity of O(log N) it still takes a while to complete
    lookup (or, even more for replacement) of an entry, when the amount
    of entries is huge (100K+).
    
    B-trees are known to handle such cases more efficiently (i. e. also
    with O(log N) complexity but with way lower coefficient) so trying
    zswap with B-trees was worth a shot.
    
    The implementation of B-trees that is currently present in Linux
    kernel isn't really doing things in the best possible way (i. e. it
    has recursion) but the testing I've run still shows a very
    significant performance increase.
    
    The usage pattern of B-tree here is not exactly following the
    guidelines but it is due to the fact that pgoff_t may be both 32
    and 64 bits long.
    
    
  • Zswap Could See Better Performance Thanks To A B-Tree Search Implementation

    For those using Zswap as a compressed RAM cache for swapping on Linux systems, the performance could soon see a measurable improvement. Developer Vitaly Wool has posted a patch that switches the Zswap code from using red-black trees to a B-tree for searching. Particularly for when having to search a large number of entries, the B-trees implementation should do so much more efficiently.

  • AT&T Finally Opens Up dNOS "DANOS" Network Operating System Code

    One and a half years late, the "DANOS" (known formerly as "dNOS") network operating system is now open-source under the Linux Foundation. AT&T and the Linux Foundation originally announced their plan in early 2018 wish pushing for this network operating system to be used on more mobile infrastructure. At the time they expected it to happen in H2'2018, but finally on 15 November 2019 the goal came to fruition.

Security Patches and FUD/Drama