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Red Hat

Red Hat's Stubbornness Will Keep OpenShift Alive

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Red Hat

Insiders have publicly bet against Red Hat's platform-as-a-service, but I say it will stand by OpenShift without regret.

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Red Hat's Fedora 21 brimming with security, crypto upgrades

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Fedora 21, the next version of Red Hat's Fedora distribution of Linux, just received a slew of new feature approvals courtesy of the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee.

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Red Hat kicks out sponsor, then relents

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Red Hat

Matthew Garrett, a former Red Hat employee who has gained something of a public profile, suggested that Piston had got itself into Red Hat's bad books by competing against it for a contract - and winning.

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Red Hat fast-tracks Docker apps for Enterprise Linux

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Red Hat's application certification program is nominally about ensuring that third-party applications and app platforms run reliably on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

The newest candidate for certification, though, isn't an application per se. Rather, it's an application technology that stormed the Linux world and quickly became a major part of its landscape: containerization, which allows apps to be packaged to run almost anywhere with minimal muss or fuss.

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Ojuba

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat

So Ojuba project manage many projects that make changes, Ojuba contribute in Fedora iself and in many big open source projects as KDE,MATE,VLC,Wine and others.

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Makulu, Ubuntu, and Red Hat

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Red Hat
Ubuntu

Today's perusal of the headlines revealed a review of MakuluLinux 5, a Debian derivative with unusual default software. In addition, Matt Hartley asks if animosity towards Ubuntu is misplaced and recounts recent controversies. Finally today, another interview with Red Hat CEO and a review of Red Hat clone ClearOS are covered.

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Red Hat Risk Reflex (The Linux Security Flaw That Isn't)

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Red Hat
Security

News headlines screaming that yet another Microsoft Windows vulnerability has been discovered, is in the wild or has just been patched are two a penny. Such has it ever been. News headlines declaring that a 'major security problem' has been found with Linux are a different kettle of fish. So when reports of an attack that could circumvent verification of X.509 security certificates, and by so doing bypass both secure sockets layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) website protection, people sat up and took notice. Warnings have appeared that recount how the vulnerability can impact upon Debian, Red Hat and Ubuntu distributions. Red Hat itself issued an advisory warning that "GnuTLS did not correctly handle certain errors that could occur during the verification of an X.509 certificate, causing it to incorrectly report a successful verification... An attacker could use this flaw to create a specially crafted certificate that could be accepted by GnuTLS as valid." In all, at least 200 operating systems actually use GnuTLS when it comes to implementing SSL and TLS and the knock-on effect could mean that web applications and email alike are vulnerable to attack. And it's all Linux's fault. Or is it?

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Fedora 21 Being Planned For Mid-October Release

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Red Hat

The next Fedora Linux release is being postponed until October since if shipping in August they are left midway between GNOME 3.12 and 3.14. GNOME 3.14 will be released by late September and thus if shipping in mid-to-late October would allow time for a fresh GNOME 3.14 desktop to be incorporated into the release. October/November release targets have also been what's long been sought after by Fedora (among other distributions) for nailing close to the GNOME release time-frame and other software projects.

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Yes there was a security hole in Linux, but Red Hat already fixed it

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Security

Originally reported by Ars Technica, the fix was available by the time the general public was made aware of it. It’s actually fairly similar to a certain security hole that lived for a year and could have allowed for exploits to be used in the wild.

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Red Hat's Polymita acquisition to spawn new products

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Red Hat

Red Hat's (NYSE: RHT) 2012 acquisition of Spanish startup Polymita Technologies is about to bear fruit.

That’s according to a Red Hat spokesperson who gave me some additional insight into a press conference that the Raleigh-based open source software company will hold on Tuesday at 11 a.m. to announce new products in middleware.

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More in Tux Machines

QOwnNotes for Debian (update)

Some time ago I posted about QOwnNotes for Debian. My recent experience with the openSUSE Build System has convinced me to move also the QOwnNotes packages there, which allows me to provide builds for Debian/Buster, Debian/testing, and Debian/sid, all for both i386 and amd64 architectures. To repeat a bit about QOwnNotes, it is a cross-platform plain text and markdown note taking application. By itself, it wouldn’t be something to talk about, we have vim and emacs and everything in between. But QOwnNotes integrates nicely with the Notes application from NextCloud and OwnCloud, as well as providing useful integration with NextCloud like old version of notes, access to deleted files, watching changes, etc. Read more

Firefox for Remote Work and Streaming

Devices: Raspberry Pi, WinSystems and Estone

  • How to Fight Coronavirus With Your Raspberry Pi

    With the coronavirus pandemic raging, many PC users have dedicated CPU cycles to medical research using Folding@Home (we’re even doing a fold-off competition with AnandTech). Though Folding@Home does not run on a Raspberry Pi, you can participate in Rosetta@Home, a similar project that’s also researching COVID-19, by installing a free Linux app called BOINC. BOINC has been around for a long time and supports many different research projects, including Asteroids@Home, which does space research, and some of these projects will work on Raspbian, Raspberry Pi’s official OS. However, the addition of Rosetta@Home is new, and if you want to join that project, you need to run BOINC on a 64-bit operating system (OS), such as Ubuntu (64-bit). Rosetta@Home will not give you any workloads if you try it in Raspbian. Here’s how to use your Raspberry Pi to fight coronavirus with BOINC and Rosetta@Home.

  • Compact Apollo Lake computer runs Linux

    WinSystems’ fanless, Linux-ready “SYS-ITX-N-3900” computer has an Apollo Lake SoC, -20 to 60°C support, wide-range power, M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion, and a compact 150 x 150 x 50mm footprint. A year and a half after the first Intel Gemini Lake based embedded computers arrived, we have seen only a few models based on this latest Atom family of chips. Gemini Lake continues to be in short supply, as it has been since its arrival. Yet, the industry keeps churning out computers based on the similarly 14nm fabricated Apollo Lake platform. The latest is WinSystems’ fanless SYS-ITX-N-3900, which runs Linux or Windows 10 IoT on dual- or quad-core Apollo Lake Atom SoCs.

  • i.MX8M Mini Pico-ITX board has a DSP for voice control plus optional AI

    Estone’s “EMB-2237-AI” Pico-ITX SBC integrates a “SOM-2237” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M Mini and adds a DSP for audio. The carrier adds LAN with PoE, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, mics and speakers, and an M.2 slot with Edge TPU AI support. Estone Technology’s EMB-2237-AI is the first SBC we’ve seen to combine the 100 x 72mm Pico-ITX form-factor with an NXP i.MX8M Mini SoC. Other Mini-based SBCs include Seco’s SBC-C61, Boardcon’s sandwich-style EM-IMX8M-MINI, and Garz & Fricke’s recent Tanaro, among others.

Ubuntu: Xubuntu 20.04 Beta Run Through, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Security Fixes and Plymouth

  • Xubuntu 20.04 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Xubuntu 20.04 Beta. Enjoy!

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 625

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 625 for the week of March 29 – April 4, 2020. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for Ubuntu to Fix 4 Flaws

    Canonical has released today new Linux kernel security updates for all supported Ubuntu releases to address a total of four security vulnerabilities discovered by various researchers. Affecting all supported Ubuntu releases and kernels, a flaw (CVE-2020-8428) discovered by Al Viro in Linux kernel’s VFS (Virtual Filesystem Switch) layer, which could allow a local attacker to crash the system or expose sensitive information, was patched in this update. On top of that, the new Linux kernel security update also fixes a vulnerability (CVE-2019-19046) discovered in the IPMI message handler implementation, which could allow a local attacker to cause a denial of service (kernel memory exhaustion). This flaw affects only Ubuntu 19.10 and Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS systems running Linux kernel 5.3.

  • Canonical Contributing Upstream Improvements To Plymouth Ahead Of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    One of the immediate differences Ubuntu 20.04 desktop/laptop users will notice when booting in UEFI mode is the boot splash screen improvements thanks to leveraging Red Hat's work on providing a flicker-free boot experience and pulling in the UEFI BGRT system/motherboard logo during the boot process to provide a more transitive experience. Canonical in turn is working on pushing some of their improvements back into upstream Plymouth. The Ubuntu 20.04 LTS boot experience is on-par to what has been found in Fedora and other Linux distributions like Arch Linux for over one year.