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Red Hat

Fedora 21 Gets U-Boot, Xorg, jQuery Changes

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Red Hat

Last week there were a great number of interesting features approved for the Fedora 21 release due out in October~November. This week there isn't quite as many items that were on the FESCo agenda, but there's still some interesting work that hopes to make it into this next Fedora Linux release. The approved items at yesterday's FESCo meeting were

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XP Users, Fedora Community Hubs, and openSUSE 13.2

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Red Hat
Microsoft
SUSE

In the Linux news today is a new survey of small business owners finds that 11% will switch to Linux when XP is really really officially no longer supported. In other news, Fedora Chris Roberts speaks Fedora changes and Matthew Miller shares plans for the new Fedora "community hubs." And Jos Poortvliet kicked off the official development season for openSUSE 13.2.

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Red Hat plans unified security management for Fedora 21

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Red Hat

Profiles would cover things like TLS/SSL and DTLS versioning, ciphersuite selection and ordering, certificate and key exchange parameters including minimum key length, acceptable elliptic curve (ECDH or ECDSA for example), signature hash functions, and TLS options like safe renegotiation.

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Red Hat's Stubbornness Will Keep OpenShift Alive

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Red Hat

Insiders have publicly bet against Red Hat's platform-as-a-service, but I say it will stand by OpenShift without regret.

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Red Hat's Fedora 21 brimming with security, crypto upgrades

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Fedora 21, the next version of Red Hat's Fedora distribution of Linux, just received a slew of new feature approvals courtesy of the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee.

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Red Hat kicks out sponsor, then relents

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Red Hat

Matthew Garrett, a former Red Hat employee who has gained something of a public profile, suggested that Piston had got itself into Red Hat's bad books by competing against it for a contract - and winning.

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Red Hat fast-tracks Docker apps for Enterprise Linux

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat

Red Hat's application certification program is nominally about ensuring that third-party applications and app platforms run reliably on Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

The newest candidate for certification, though, isn't an application per se. Rather, it's an application technology that stormed the Linux world and quickly became a major part of its landscape: containerization, which allows apps to be packaged to run almost anywhere with minimal muss or fuss.

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Ojuba

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GNU
Linux
Red Hat

So Ojuba project manage many projects that make changes, Ojuba contribute in Fedora iself and in many big open source projects as KDE,MATE,VLC,Wine and others.

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Makulu, Ubuntu, and Red Hat

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Red Hat
Ubuntu

Today's perusal of the headlines revealed a review of MakuluLinux 5, a Debian derivative with unusual default software. In addition, Matt Hartley asks if animosity towards Ubuntu is misplaced and recounts recent controversies. Finally today, another interview with Red Hat CEO and a review of Red Hat clone ClearOS are covered.

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Red Hat Risk Reflex (The Linux Security Flaw That Isn't)

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Red Hat
Security

News headlines screaming that yet another Microsoft Windows vulnerability has been discovered, is in the wild or has just been patched are two a penny. Such has it ever been. News headlines declaring that a 'major security problem' has been found with Linux are a different kettle of fish. So when reports of an attack that could circumvent verification of X.509 security certificates, and by so doing bypass both secure sockets layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) website protection, people sat up and took notice. Warnings have appeared that recount how the vulnerability can impact upon Debian, Red Hat and Ubuntu distributions. Red Hat itself issued an advisory warning that "GnuTLS did not correctly handle certain errors that could occur during the verification of an X.509 certificate, causing it to incorrectly report a successful verification... An attacker could use this flaw to create a specially crafted certificate that could be accepted by GnuTLS as valid." In all, at least 200 operating systems actually use GnuTLS when it comes to implementing SSL and TLS and the knock-on effect could mean that web applications and email alike are vulnerable to attack. And it's all Linux's fault. Or is it?

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More in Tux Machines

RedisInsight Revealed and WordPress 5.2.4 Released

  • Redis Labs eases database management with RedisInsight

    The robust market of tools to help users of the Redis database manage their systems just got a new entrant. Redis Labs disclosed the availability of its RedisInsight tool, a graphical user interface (GUI) for database management and operations. Redis is a popular open source NoSQL database that is also increasingly being used in cloud-native Kubernetes deployments as users move workloads to the cloud. Open source database use is growing quickly according to recent reports as the need for flexible, open systems to meet different needs has become a common requirement. Among the challenges often associated with databases of any type is ease of management, which Redis is trying to address with RedisInsight.

  • WordPress 5.2.4 Update

    Late-breaking news on the 5.2.4 short-cycle security release that landed October 14. When we released the news post, I inadvertently missed giving props to Simon Scannell of RIPS Technologies for finding and disclosing an issue where path traversal can lead to remote code execution. Simon has done a great deal of work on the WordPress project, and failing to mention his contributions is a huge oversight on our end. Thank you to all of the reporters for privately disclosing vulnerabilities, which gave us time to fix them before WordPress sites could be attacked.

Desktop GNU/Linux: Rick and Morty, Georges Basile Stavracas Neto on GNOME and Linux Format on Eoan Ermine

  • We know where Rick (from Rick and Morty) stands on Intel vs AMD debate

    For one, it appears Rick is running a version of Debian with a very old Linux kernel (3.2.0) — one dating back to 2012. He badly needs to install some frickin’ updates. “Also his partitions are real weird. It’s all Microsoft based partitions,” a Redditor says. “A Linux user would never do [this] unless they were insane since NTFS/Exfat drivers on Linux are not great.”

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Every shell has a story

    … a wise someone once muttered while walking on a beach, as they picked up a shell lying on the sand. Indeed, every shell began somewhere, crossed a unique path with different goals and driven by different motivations. Some shells were created to optimize for mobility; some, for lightness; some, for speed; some were created to just fit whoever is using it and do their jobs efficiently. It’s statistically close to impossible to not find a suitable shell, one could argue. So, is this a blog about muttered shell wisdom? In some way, it actually is. It is, indeed, about Shell, and about Mutter. And even though “wisdom” is perhaps a bit of an overstatement, it is expected that whoever reads this blog doesn’t leave it less wise, so the word applies to a certain degree. Evidently, the Shell in question is composed of bits and bytes; its protection is more about the complexities of a kernel and command lines than sea predators, and the Mutter is actually more about compositing the desktop than barely audible uttering.

  • Adieu, 32

    The tenth month of the year arrives and so does a new Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) update. Is it a portent that this is the 31st release of Ubuntu and with the 32nd release next year, 32-bit x86 Ubuntu builds will end?

Linux Kernel and Linux Foundation

  • Linux's Crypto API Is Adopting Some Aspects Of Zinc, Opening Door To Mainline WireGuard

    Mainlining of the WireGuard secure VPN tunnel was being held up by its use of the new "Zinc" crypto API developed in conjunction with this network tech. But with obstacles in getting Zinc merged, WireGuard was going to be resorting to targeting the existing kernel crypto interfaces. Instead, however, it turns out the upstream Linux crypto developers were interested and willing to incorporate some elements of Zinc into the existing kernel crypto implementation. Back in September is when Jason Donenfeld decided porting WireGuard to the existing Linux crypto API was the best path forward for getting this secure networking functionality into the mainline kernel in a timely manner. But since then other upstream kernel developers working on the crypto subsystem ended up with patches incorporating some elements of Zinc's design.

  • zswap: use B-tree for search
    The current zswap implementation uses red-black trees to store
    entries and to perform lookups. Although this algorithm obviously
    has complexity of O(log N) it still takes a while to complete
    lookup (or, even more for replacement) of an entry, when the amount
    of entries is huge (100K+).
    
    B-trees are known to handle such cases more efficiently (i. e. also
    with O(log N) complexity but with way lower coefficient) so trying
    zswap with B-trees was worth a shot.
    
    The implementation of B-trees that is currently present in Linux
    kernel isn't really doing things in the best possible way (i. e. it
    has recursion) but the testing I've run still shows a very
    significant performance increase.
    
    The usage pattern of B-tree here is not exactly following the
    guidelines but it is due to the fact that pgoff_t may be both 32
    and 64 bits long.
    
    
  • Zswap Could See Better Performance Thanks To A B-Tree Search Implementation

    For those using Zswap as a compressed RAM cache for swapping on Linux systems, the performance could soon see a measurable improvement. Developer Vitaly Wool has posted a patch that switches the Zswap code from using red-black trees to a B-tree for searching. Particularly for when having to search a large number of entries, the B-trees implementation should do so much more efficiently.

  • AT&T Finally Opens Up dNOS "DANOS" Network Operating System Code

    One and a half years late, the "DANOS" (known formerly as "dNOS") network operating system is now open-source under the Linux Foundation. AT&T and the Linux Foundation originally announced their plan in early 2018 wish pushing for this network operating system to be used on more mobile infrastructure. At the time they expected it to happen in H2'2018, but finally on 15 November 2019 the goal came to fruition.

Security Patches and FUD/Drama