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Red Hat

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Installation of RHEL 6.10 with Screenshots

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux is a Linux-based operating system developed by Red Hat and targeted the commercial market. The Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 is available for x86, x86-64 for Itanium, PowerPC and IBM System z, and desktop versions.

    This article explains how to boot the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 installation wizard (anaconda) to install Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 on 32-bit and 64-bit x86 systems.

  • The evolution behind Red Hat Summit Virtual Labs: Pivoting to Success

    With the wrap-up of Red Hat Summit 2020 Virtual Experience, we often look back and reflect on the highlights of what we as an organization have successfully accomplished in delivering to our attendees. However, this particular Summit stands out among its predecessors, in that our entire planned on-site conference for San Francisco was completely virtualized in a matter of weeks. The first of its kind, our virtual experience reached an audience like never before.

    Completely free for anyone to attend, talk to subject matter experts, learn about new and exciting advancements in open source technologies, and understand what makes Red Hat an industry leader. More than 56,000 attendees globally joined over two full days of keynotes, general sessions, live chats with experts, breakout sessions and virtual labs.

    To have an event with such a broad reach required a significant undertaking in ensuring that the supporting structure behind the scenes could handle the load. This included the supporting structure for attendees to take part in lab environments to get hands-on experience with popular applications and platforms, including Red Hat Ansible, Red Hat Ansible Tower, Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and Red Hat OpenStack Platform. Without the ability to be physically present at the event, a new solution was necessary.

  • Fedora Classroom Session: Git 101 with Pagure

    The Fedora Classroom is a project to help people by spreading knowledge on subjects related to Fedora for others, If you would like to propose a session, feel free to open a ticket here with the tag classroom. If you’re interested in taking a proposed session, kindly let us know and once you take it, you will be awarded the Sensei Badge too as a token of appreciation. Recordings from the previous sessions can be found here.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Command Line Heroes: Becoming a Coder
  • Bank of America, Google, and Red Hat Executives Join OASIS Board of Directors

    OASIS, the international standards and open source consortium, today announced that three new members were elected to its Board of Directors: Jeremy Allison of Google, Rich Bowen of Red Hat, and Wende Peters of Bank of America. Their depth of experience in the open source and open standards communities bolsters the Board’s reach and establishes OASIS as the home for worldwide standards in cybersecurity, blockchain, privacy, cryptography, cloud computing, IoT, urban mobility, emergency management, and other content technologies.

    These three new members join the continuing members of the Board: Martin Chapman of Oracle, Bruce Rich of Cryptsoft, Jason Keirstead of IBM, Beth Pumo of Kaiser Permanente, and Daniel Reidel of New Context. Reelected Board members Frederick Hirsch, Individual member; Gershon Janssen, Individual member; and Richard Struse of Mitre will each serve a two-year term starting in July 2020.

  • OpenStack @ 10: Red Hat’s take on a decade of customer defined clouds and an update on Red Hat OpenStack Platform

    From the early days, Red Hat has supported the OpenStack project and we’ve built a platform of our own with Red Hat OpenStack Platform. This month, we look back at how far OpenStack has come in the last 10 years, how Red Hat has contributed and lastly, we celebrate the general availability of our next version with Red Hat OpenStack Platform 16.1, available later this month.

    [...]

    By 2014, Red Hat was already a major contributor to the project. This not only brought enterprise support from a heavily-invested contributor, but also helped drive community input from customers who may not otherwise have participated. The increasing diversity and chorus of voices within the community helped bring forth new projects and features to solve problems. In addition, the introduction of Red Hat OpenStack Certification widened industry support, launching with more than 100 tech industry leaders as members.

    The Icehouse (Sleepy and Juno (J) releases coincided with Red Hat OpenStack Platform’s three-year support life cycle, launched with Red Hat OpenStack Platform 5. This meant that enterprises could choose a platform and standardize on it for an extended period, providing stability for the workloads that need it. Red Hat OpenStack Platform 6 kept the ball rolling with more than 700 enhancements, updates and changes to the platform as it continued to grow and mature.

  • How Automation can help banks improve security, compliance, and productivity

    FSIs spend a lot of time responding to auditors. Compliance with regulatory mandates often dictates processes. However, variance in processes can increase tension between developers working to improve the organization’s agility; teams responsible for maintaining operations; and security and compliance teams.

    Without a clear joint process, each of the teams may develop their own. Inconsistent IT configurations, patching and testing can make management and reporting difficult. A lack of shared processes can also allow technical debt to build, which inhibits change and introduces risk.

    In addition to managing digital transformation, IT systems are upgraded regularly, entailing an intense period where the IT team focuses on configuration and testing every piece of technology. While this work is critically important, and because the risk exposure is significant if each component is not updated and tested, it is also stressful and can be tedious.

    The challenge is further increased because many financial organizations are operating across a range of different environments, like Windows, Linux, public and private clouds, virtualized and container environments, increasing the complexity of their IT footprint.

  • My Outreachy Internship: The journey so far…

    I’ve gotten stuck with many issues over the coding period, some more facepalm than others. For example, I wasted almost a week trying to get my setup running on docker-compose only to realize that the problem was just mislabelled services. In another one, while writing a script to initialize a MySQL db I put a space after the ‘-p’ so my builds kept failing.

    Of course, these issues shouldn’t have taken more than a couple of hours to figure out but more often than not it took days. All this reminds me of the struggle I had when I started learning JavaScript. Trusting the environment/ecosystem did not come easy. It was normal for me to think that the bugs that I was getting were because of a bigger force that I did not understand yet. This would force me to blindly go on an expedition to really understand what’s going on.. only to realize that the issue was right in front of me and I never needed to read anything beyond the files that I wrote. However, even after the time I had lost the net result was always positive. The more ‘blind expeditions’ I went on the more knowledge I accumulated and the more confidence I gained to commit.

    A bigger hurdle for me has been adjusting to the work-from-home lifestyle. Especially with the pandemic my entire routine has been disrupted and finding a balance has been a challenge.

  • Introduction to Red Hat Insights

    Red Hat Insights is a SaaS application that is available free of charge to everyone with a valid Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) subscription.

    This article provides a brief introduction to Red Hat Insights, shows how RHEL systems are integrated into the cloud service, and lists key documents and resources related to the service.

    Author's note: I'm testing the service as part of my job at the Bielefeld IT Service Center (BITS) at Bielefeld University. This article reflects my personal view of Red Hat Insights. Furthermore, I would like to clarify that I am a member of the Red Hat Accelerators community.

  • Developing and testing on production with Kubernetes and Istio Workspace

    Due to container-orchestration platforms like Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift, developers have become very efficient about deploying and managing distributed and containerized applications. But can we say the same about application development and testing?

    In this article, I briefly discuss how cloud-native development is transforming the traditional development cycle of coding, building, and testing. I then introduce the idea of testing on production, not as a meme but as a necessity. Finally, I introduce Istio Workspace, a tool for developers working with distributed systems running on Kubernetes or OpenShift.

    [...]

    Testing new functionality before it reaches production has always been hard, but the shift from monoliths to microservices has brought scale, which has increased the challenge of testing locally. We see developers trying to use tools like Red Hat CodeReady Containers or Minikube to spin up whole applications composed of multiple services. While this approach works well when projects are relatively small, it’s not so easy when you introduce more fine-grained services, and the graph starts to grow. It is not feasible to spin up even a medium-sized distributed system on your own machine.

    Using replicated environments such as staging or quality engineering (QE) gives some confidence, but it’s expensive in terms of both cost and maintenance. Despite the effort of defining infrastructure as code, there are still potential differences in the target machines’ configuration; they just show up on the operating system and hardware level. It is also frequently impossible to get the same load and volume of data on the test system that is in the actual system. Therefore, testing on production is no longer a meme: It’s a reality and a necessity.

    What’s needed is a way to use your favorite tools to develop, build, and debug your code locally, but have your application behave as if it were running in the production cluster.

CentOS Vs. Ubuntu Server : Everything You Need to Know

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
Ubuntu

Choosing the perfect Linux distribution to set up your server can be confusing since Linux provides a limitless number of options. The main reason behind these many distributions is because Linux is an opensource platform. Anybody with the required skills can contribute to the development or build and release their distribution. Currently, there are more than 600 Linux Desktop and Server distributions in the market.

Despite these many distributions, there are two principal Linux server distributions dominant in the market – CentOS and Ubuntu Server. Both are excellent choices for a server, and they both have their advantages over the other.

In this CentOS vs. Ubuntu comparison, we will look at the key features of both operating systems to guide you in choosing the right distributions for your Virtual Private Server.

Before shedding light on these two well-matched opponents’ features and services, let’s have a brief look at each of them.

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IBM/Red Hat: systemd, chatbots, remote work and why Java and Quarkus are important for your business

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Red Hat

  • systemd-oomd Looks Like It Will Come Together For systemd 247

    Systemd-oomd is the out-of-memory daemon developed by Facebook and systemd developers. They are aiming for this to be better Linux handling of out-of-memory / low memory situations. Facebook originally wrote their OOMD code for their servers and since then has continued to be refined and adapted so it works out equally as well on desktops and more.

    Systemd-oomd polls systemd for OOMD-enabled cgroups to monitor them and kill based on memory pressure or swap usage. The systemd-oomd behavior is controlled via a new oomd.conf configuration file. Cgroups will need to employ EnableOomdKill if they want to be killed when under pressure.

  • 8th grader creates Watson-powered chatbot to help students plan for college during COVID-19

    When eighth-grader Harita Suresh found herself stuck at home due to the coronavirus, she decided to use her extra time to learn something new. After perusing edX.org, she settled on a course from IBM called AI chatbots without programming, which claimed that she would be able to build a fully functional chatbot with no prior knowledge about AI.

    Two weeks later, she’d used her newfound knowledge to create and launch a fully functioning chatbot — Rita — for her dad’s business, Analyze-Ed.

  • 3 best practices for working on a distributed team

    I have mixed feelings about instant messaging platforms. Pulling quick conversations out of email and into Slack often does improve resolution times for small issues, but a successful rollout requires some setting of expectations. Fundamentally, I do not believe it is reasonable to expect prompt responses to IM messages during the workday. Giving employees time for focused, uninterrupted work is vital. These tools provide functionalities to customize alerts, including muting all notifications (with a configurable option that lets others force alerts through as needed), muting individual channels, setting up various keyword notifications, and a wide range of other options not covered here.

    However, these controls are meaningless if there is an organizational expectation of prompt responses. Too frequently, I see folks asking a question like "Is anyone working on the database?" and, after less than five minutes, following up with "Okay, sounds like nobody is working on it, I am going to make my changes."

    Not only does this assume everyone has the same working hours, which immediately breaks down when you have remote team members in different time zones, it also ignores the reality of work both in and out of the office. Packages get delivered, coffee needs to be prepared, meetings are attended, and, sometimes, real work is being done! Take an empathetic look at your co-workers' needs and build expectations that allow for async work.

  • Why Java and Quarkus are important for your business

    Java has been the workhorse of enterprise software application development for the past 25 years. During this time, we have also seen some drastic changes to application infrastructure technologies - ones that are not always compatible with the Java framework. We have seen it all: from monolithic application servers, to API-driven programmable infrastructure, to just-in-time intelligent serverless infrastructures. We have gone from extensive setup and dynamic configuration for peak workloads, to expressing the ideal operational model as code for our applications. Now with serverless computing, developers can focus on providing the application code and letting an intelligent application infrastructure run and scale up and down for use, without even thinking about infrastructure concerns.

    Increasingly, modern application infrastructure tends to be immutable, meaning that servers are not able to be modified after they have been deployed. Immutable infrastructure can help simplify operations and lead to simpler, more predictable, and consistent deployment processes. When changes are required, the old configuration can be replaced with a new configuration to keep the environments consistent and easily reproducible across development, test and production. However, the traditional Java framework was designed for changeable application infrastructure that is no longer required in modern cloud environments.

OpenShift 4.5

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Red Hat
  • Improved navigation in the OpenShift 4.5 Developer perspective

    The new Red Hat OpenShift 4.5 release includes a more streamlined and customizable navigation experience in the web console’s Developer perspective. In this article, we quickly share the highlights of the new navigation features that we added based on user feedback.

  • What’s new in the OpenShift 4.5 console developer experience

    Each new release of Red Hat OpenShift includes usability improvements and features to help developers meet their goals. In OpenShift 4.5, we’ve improved navigation and added a mechanism for customizing navigation and accessing frequently used resources from the Developer perspective.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat

  • Making compliance scalable in a container world

    Software is increasingly being distributed as container images. Container images include the many software components needed to support the featured software in the container. Thus, distribution of a container image involves distribution of many software components, which typically include GPL-licensed components. We can't expect every company that distributes container images to become an open source compliance expert, so we need to build compliance into container technology.

    [...]
    Package maintainers and package management tools have played an underappreciated role in source availability for over two decades. The focused nature of a package, the role of a package maintainer, and the tooling that has been built to support package management systems results in the expectation that someone (the package maintainer) will take responsibility for seeing that the sources are available. Tools that build binaries also collect the corresponding sources into an archive that can be delivered alongside the binaries. The result is that most people don't need to think about source code availability. The sources are available in the same unit as the delivery of the executable software and via the same distribution mechanism; for software delivered as an RPM, the corresponding source is available in a source RPM.

    In contrast, there is no convention for providing the source code that corresponds to a container image.

    The many software components in a container image often include GPL-licensed software. Companies that may not have much experience with distribution of FOSS software may begin distributing GPL-licensed software when they start offering their software in the form of container images. Let's make it straightforward for everyone, including companies who may be new to FOSS, to provide source code in a consistent way.

  • Relive summer of OSCON: Fight COVID-19 with Node-RED and Call for Code

    The first round of the Summer of OSCON may be over, but you can still answer the Call for Code and explore how you can use Node-RED and other open source technologies to create solutions that fight COVID-19.

    Join IBMer John Walicki in a replay of his OSCON live-coding session. He shows you how to use Node-RED and APIs from the Weather Channel related to Covid-19 to quickly build out a tracking application.

  • Behavior is easy, state is hard: Tame inconsistent state in your Java code

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn the root cause of common inconsistent state-related bugs in your production Java code—and how to solve them—from Edson Yanaga and Burr Sutter.

    NullPointerException on a field that was never supposed to be null? A negative value on an “always positive” field? Ever wondered why these bugs happen? You’re not alone. Watch this session to learn the root cause of these common bugs in production Java code, and how to solve them by applying some interesting techniques in your business code.

  • Culture of Innovation: Using AI to Solve Problems at Red Hat

    Red Hat is continually innovating and part of that innovation includes researching and striving to solve the problems our customers face. That innovation is driven in part through the Office of the CTO and includes Red Hat OpenShift, Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage and use cases such as the Open Hybrid Cloud, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. We recently interviewed Michael Clifford, Data Scientist in the office of the CTO, here at Red Hat about these very topics.

  • Fedora documentation is now multilingual

    The Fedora project documentation website provides a lot of end-users content. All of this content is now translateable, providing a powerful tool for our multilingual communication. Writers will continue to work as usual. The publishing tools automatically convert content and push it to the translation platform. Then, translated content is automatically published.

  • PHP version 7.2.32, 7.3.20 and 7.4.8

    RPMs of PHP version 7.4.8 are available in remi repository for Fedora 32 and remi-php74 repository for Fedora 30-31 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 7 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPMs of PHP version 7.3.20 are available in remi repository for Fedora 30-31 and remi-php73 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

    RPMs of PHP version 7.2.32 are available in remi-php72 repository for Enterprise Linux ≥ 6 (RHEL, CentOS).

  • Stirring things up for Fedora 33

    The next release of the Fedora distribution — Fedora 33 — is currently scheduled for the end of October. Fedora's nature as a fast-moving distribution ensures that each release will contain a number of attention-getting changes, but Fedora 33 is starting to look like it may be a bit more volatile than its immediate predecessors. Several relatively controversial changes are currently under discussion on the project's mailing lists; read on for a summary.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Running Rosetta@home on a Raspberry Pi with Fedora IoT

    The Rosetta@home project is a not-for-profit distributed computing project created by the Baker laboratory at the University of Washington. The project uses idle compute capacity from volunteer computers to study protein structure, which is used in research into diseases such as HIV, Malaria, Cancer, and Alzheimer’s.

    In common with many other scientific organizations, Rosetta@home is currently expending significant resources on the search for vaccines and treatments for COVID-19.

    Rosetta@home uses the open source BOINC platform to manage donated compute resources. BOINC was originally developed to support the SETI@home project searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. These days, it is used by a number of projects in many different scientific fields. A single BOINC client can contribute compute resources to many such projects, though not all projects support all architectures.

    For the example shown in this article a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B was used, which is one of the tested reference devices for Fedora IoT. This device, with only 1GB of RAM, is only just powerful enough to be able to make a meaningful contribution to Rosetta@home, and there’s certainly no way the Raspberry Pi can be used for anything else – such as running a desktop environment – at the same time.

  • Leading the way for Open Transformation in APAC

    "Transformation isn’t something that happens for only a focused period of time, and then there’s no change after that." - Anthony Watson, lead, Enterprise Domains, ANZ Bank

    The evolution and advancement of technologies grow to new heights every day, bringing unprecedented change in what individuals and corporations can create. To keep pace, organizations must continue to adopt, adapt, and advance their processes, but to acquire new technology is often not enough to bring a true change.

  • APAC Companies Prioritize Cultural Change and Technology Modernization to Accelerate Digital Transformation

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the results of a commissioned study by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services, on behalf of Red Hat, exploring Asia Pacific’s (APAC) transformation and innovation trajectory against a global backdrop. The study, titled "Understanding APAC’s Success in Digital Transformation," surveyed 143 business executives from APAC from various industries including financial services, IT and manufacturing sectors.

  • Introducing OpenShift cost management: A human-readable view into cloud-native application costs

    From dramatically increased telework demands to a surge in online services usage, IT teams are facing a new set of realities in managing their hybrid cloud environments. For IT decision-makers, this goes above and beyond just keeping infrastructure running and efficient; it’s about budget. Solving these new challenges often requires additional spending on infrastructure, something that IT teams simply may not have. This makes it critically important that IT teams can more quickly and easily see the totality of their IT costs across the hybrid cloud.

Btrfs in Next Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Btrfs by default, the compression option

    Hi,

    The change proposal has a 'compression option' and we kinda need to get organized. https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Changes/BtrfsByDefault#Compression

    - Compression saves space, significantly reduces write amplification and therefore increases flash lifespan, and in some cases increases performance.
    - Desired but not a requirement of the change proposal.

    1. Goal: probably the goal performance wise is to perform as good or better than now. Is it OK if there's a write time performance hit for a small percent of folks, for a high value target like usr that isn't updated that often, and is also updated out of band (offline updates typically, but also isn't something directly related to the daily workload)? How to decide this?

    2. Benchmarking: this is hard. A simple tool for doing comparisons among algorithms on a specific bit of hardware is lzbench. https://github.com/inikep/lzbench How to compile on F32. https://github.com/inikep/lzbench/issues/69 But is that adequate? How do we confirm/deny on a wide variety of hardware that this meets the goal? And how is this test going to account for parallelization, and read ahead? Do we need a lot of data or is it adequate to get a sample "around the edges" (e.g. slow cpu fast drive; fast cpu slow drive; fast cpu fast drive; slow cpu slow drive). What algorithm?

    3. Improvements and upgrades. We'll do plan A, but learn new things later, and come up with plan B. How do we get the plan A folks upgraded to plan B? Or just don't worry?

    4. The whole file system (using a mount option) or curated (using an XATTR set on specific "high value" directories)? This part is elaborated below.

    A. do this with a mount option '-o compress=zstd:1'
    - dilemma: it doesn't always lead to equal or better performance. On some systems and workloads, write performance is slightly reduced. What about LZO?

    B. do this with per directory XATTR
    - dilemma: the target directories don't exist at install time, depending on whether the installation is rsync, rpm, or unsquashfs based.

    C. do the install with '-o compres=zstd', then set XATTR post-install
    - dilemma: the installed files won't have XATTR set, only new files inherit; does a 'dnf update' overwrite files and therefore the XATTR is not inherited, or are they new files and do inherit the XATTR?

    D. Which directories? Some may be outside of the installer's scope.
    /usr /var/lib/flatpak
    ~/.local/share/flatpak
    /var/lib/containers/
    ~/.local/share/containers/
    ~/.var
    ~/.cache

    (Plausible this list should be reversed. While compressing ~/.cache may not save much space, it's likely hammered with more changes than other locations, hence more benefit in terms of reducing write amplification.)
    For reference, the above is mostly from the description in the RFE bug attached to the feature's tracker bug. But I think it's best to have most discussion here and leave the bug for implementing+testing the implementation details. https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1851276

    Thanks,

    --
    Chris Murphy

  • Fedora Developers Evaluating Compression Options For Btrfs-By-Default Proposal

    The proposal for using Btrfs by default on the Fedora desktop is gaining a fair amount of traction and interest from the community and could possibly move ahead but further testing and decisions are still to be made.

    First of all, today marks a Fedora Btrfs test day for those wanting to help in evaluating this change proposal. Check it out if you have spare system(s) and interested in helping make the decision whether Fedora desktop spins should transition from EXT4 to Btrfs by default.

  • Btrfs to be the Default Filesystem on Fedora? Fedora 33 Starts Testing Btrfs Switch

    While we’re months away from Fedora’s next stable release (Fedora 33), there are a few changes worth keeping tabs on.

    Among all the other accepted system-wide changes for Fedora 33, the proposal of having Btrfs as the default filesystem for desktop variants is the most interesting one.

Red Hat: Security, GCC, Fedora, CentOS and Miscellany

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Insights: Your very own security consultant

    When it comes to system maintenance and management, the most critical aspect is to keep all operating systems as safe and secure as possible. This is where Red Hat Insights steps in - it helps users manage security in an easy and convenient way by analyzing system configurations. Since Red Hat Summit 2020, Red Hat Insights has extended capabilities to manage operational efficiency and security risks.

    Note: Insights is included in all Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) subscriptions.

  • Improve your code: Tales from confinement without a debugger

    Now that I have coded for some years, I’ve noticed that I have picked up some bad habits along the way. Over-dependence on the debugger is one of them. I often use it as a high-powered crutch, which frequently leads me waist-deep into stack traces, rarely stopping to think things through. I get lost inside 20 levels of recursion and wonder why an irrelevant variable is being tickled.

    Granted, there are many good uses for a debugger, but I’m at 40% on the good use scale. My uses usually start benign but then degrade into cancerous abstractions. So, for my 20th GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) hacking anniversary, I decided to give myself the challenge of one month without a debugger. Here is the tale.

    [...]

    When I first started hacking GCC, newbies at Red Hat were put on old toolchain support duty. Nine times out of 10, those bugs had already been fixed upstream. I got quite adept at running two parallel gdbs, single-stepping until I found a difference in the codes, and eventually finding the patch that fixed the bug. My technique was effective, but taught me very little about the underlying problem that I was “fixing.”

    Now, I’m a gray-bearded old fogey, and I can’t count the number of times I have put a breakpoint on the garbage collector to find out who created a chunk of memory, just to save time analyzing the where of a given optimization.

  • How Fedora and Outreachy Helped Me Hone My Flexibility With Timelines

    Update: I’m in the seventh week of my Outreachy internship with Fedora! I am working to create a GraphQL API for Bodhi. The following image shows a Gantt chart of the ideal timeline that my mentors and I came up with to get the project up and running...

  • Fedora 33 Btrfs by default Test Day 2020-07-08

    A new change proposal has been submitted for the Fedora 33 release cycle which entails usage of btrfs by default for Workstations, Servers and Spins across x86_64 and ARM architectures As a result, QA teams have organized a test day on Wed, July 08, 2020. Refer to the wiki page for links to the test cases and materials you’ll need to participate. Read below for details.

  • CentOS Community newsletter, July 2020 (#2007)

    We are pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 8.2.2004. Effectively immediately, this is the current release for CentOS Linux 8 and is tagged as 2004, derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 Source Code.

  • CentOS Stream Begins Seeing RHEL 8.3 Bits, Real-Time Repository

    Introduced alongside CentOS 8 last year was CentOS Stream as a developer-focused, rolling-release of CentOS/RHEL. With those processes getting squared away and CentOS recently debuting its RHEL 8.2 rebuild, CentOS Stream is beginning to see new and interesting material.

    In particular, early work from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.3 development is beginning to hit CentOS Stream. There is also an updated installer for CentOS Stream, new modules are coming, and perhaps most significant is the introduction of a real-time/RT repository. These RT packages are optimized for latency-sensitive workloads. The repository can be optionally enabled for those interested in optimizing their software stack for RT workloads.

  • Learn CentOS - Managing Storage

    The Learn CentOS series continues with another episode, this time checking out the concept of storage. The /etc/fstab file will be covered, as well as mounting, unmounting, and formatting storage media.

  • VR hits a new milestone, Mozilla's growing open source voice library, change in Redis maintainers, and more open source news

    In this week’s edition of our open source news roundup, Mozilla updates its open source voice stack, a tool to tame VR cybersickness, and more open source news.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Top tips for making your Call for Code submission stand out

    With the deadline for the 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge rapidly approaching (it’s Friday, July 31st at 11:59pm PDT), I have three last-minute tips and a checklist to review before you submit your entry.

  • IBM Cloud Pak for Applications in 2 minutes
  • Fedora Community Blog monthly summary: June 2020

    In May, we published 13 posts. The site had 3,753 visits from 1,736 unique viewers. Readers wrote 1 comment. 119 visits came from Fedora Planet, while 553 came from search engines.

    The most read post last month was Fedora 32 election results available, which published at the end of April.

  • Madeline Peck: Finished Storyboards!

    I also attended an executive talk this week which was really interesting to listen to. I believe it was by DeLisa Alexander (Executive Vice President and Chief People Officer) and hearing about her career track and how she encouraged working for cool places who actually took listened to your demands was an important thing to remember.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU, GTK/GNOME, and More Development News

  • GNU Emacs 27.1 Adds HarfBuzz Text Shaping, Native JSON Parsing

    GNU Emacs 27.1 is the latest feature release for this very extensible text editor. With Emacs 27.1 there is support for utilizing the HarfBuzz library for text shaping. HarfBuzz is also what's already used extensively by GNOME, KDE, Android, LibreOffice, and many other open-source applications. Emacs 27.1 also adds built-in support for arbitrary-size integers, native support for JSON parsing, better support for Cairo drawing, support for XDG conventions for init files, the lexical binding is now used by default, built-in support for tab bar and tab-line, and support for resizing/rotating images without ImageMagick, among other changes.

  • Philip Withnall: Controlling safety vs speed when writing files

    g_file_set_contents() has worked fine for many years (and will continue to do so). However, it doesn’t provide much flexibility. When writing a file out on Linux there are various ways to do it, some slower but safer — and some faster, but less safe, in the sense that if your program or the system crashes part-way through writing the file, the file might be left in an indeterminate state. It might be garbled, missing, empty, or contain only the old contents. g_file_set_contents() chose a fairly safe (but not the fastest) approach to writing out files: write the new contents to a temporary file, fsync() it, and then atomically rename() the temporary file over the top of the old file. This approach means that other processes only ever see the old file contents or the new file contents (but not the partially-written new file contents); and it means that if there’s a crash, either the old file will exist or the new file will exist. However, it doesn’t guarantee that the new file will be safely stored on disk by the time g_file_set_contents() returns. It also has fewer guarantees if the old file didn’t exist (i.e. if the file is being written out for the first time).

  • Daniel Espinosa: Training Maintainers

    Is not just help others to help you, is a matter of responsibility with Open Source Community. Your life have wonders and should change for better, so you will be lost opportunities or simple can’t work on your favorite open source project. Prepare your self to be a maintainer professor, change your mind for the beginning and help others, that is also a great contribution to open source software. Be kind. Your potential contributors will take over when required. Making sure they have the abilities and use best practices in the project, is not just good for your project, is good for all others out there; they will use them to help other projects.

  • nanotime 0.3.1: Misc Build Fixes for Yuge New Features!

    The nanotime 0.3.0 release four days ago was so exciting that we decided to do it again! Kidding aside, and fairly extensive tests notwithstanding we were bitten by a few build errors: who knew clang on macOS needed extra curlies to be happy, another manifestation of Solaris having no idea what a timezone setting “America/New_York” is, plus some extra pickyness from the SAN tests and whatnot. So Leonardo and I gave it some extra care over the weekend, uploaded it late yesterday and here we are with 0.3.1. Thanks again to CRAN for prompt processing even though they are clearly deluged shortly before their (brief) summer break.

  • Explore 10 popular open source development tools

    There is no shortage of closed-source development tools on the market, and most of them work quite well. However, developers who opt for open source tools stand to gain a number of benefits. In this piece, we'll take a quick look at the specific benefits of open source development tools, and then examine 10 of today's most popular tooling options. [...] Git is a distributed code management and version-control system, often used with web-based code management platforms like GitHub and GitLab. The integration with these platforms makes it easy for teams to contribute and collaborate, however getting the most out of Git will require some kind of third-party platform. Some claim, however, that Git support for Windows is not as robust as it is for Linux, which is potentially a turnoff for Windows-centric developers. [...] NetBeans is a Java-based IDE similar to Eclipse, and also supports development in a wide range of programming languages. However, NetBeans focuses on providing functionality out of the box, whereas Eclipse leans heavily on its plugin ecosystem to help developers set up needed features.

  • Andre Roberge: Rich + Friendly-traceback: first look

    After a couple of hours of work, I have been able to use Rich to add colour to Friendly-traceback. Rich is a fantastic project, which has already gotten a fair bit of attention and deserves even more. The following is just a preview of things to come; it is just a quick proof of concept.

  • Growing Dask To Make Scaling Python Data Science Easier At Coiled

    Python is a leading choice for data science due to the immense number of libraries and frameworks readily available to support it, but it is still difficult to scale. Dask is a framework designed to transparently run your data analysis across multiple CPU cores and multiple servers. Using Dask lifts a limitation for scaling your analytical workloads, but brings with it the complexity of server administration, deployment, and security. In this episode Matthew Rocklin and Hugo Bowne-Anderson discuss their recently formed company Coiled and how they are working to make use and maintenance of Dask in production. The share the goals for the business, their approach to building a profitable company based on open source, and the difficulties they face while growing a new team during a global pandemic.

today's howtos and instructional sessions/videos

TDF Annual Report and LibreOffice Latest

           
  • TDF Annual Report 2019

    The Annual Report of The Document Foundation for the year 2019 is now available in PDF format from TDF Nextcloud in two different versions: low resolution (6.4MB) and high resolution (53.2MB). The annual report is based on the German version presented to the authorities in April. The 54 page document has been entirely created with free open source software: written contents have obviously been developed with LibreOffice Writer (desktop) and collaboratively modified with LibreOffice Writer (online), charts have been created with LibreOffice Calc and prepared for publishing with LibreOffice Draw, drawings and tables have been developed or modified (from legacy PDF originals) with LibreOffice Draw, images have been prepared for publishing with GIMP, and the layout has been created with Scribus based on the existing templates.

  • LibreOffice QA/Dev Report: July 2020

    LibreOffice 6.4.5 was announced on July, 2

  • Physics Based Animation Effects Week#10

    This week, I was mainly working on cleaning up and migrating the patches from my experimental branch to LO master.

Better Than Top: 7 System Monitoring Tools for Linux to Keep an Eye on Vital System Stats

Top command is good but there are better alternatives to Top. Take a look at these system monitoring tools in Linux that are similar to top but are actually better. Read more