Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat

Matthew Arnold: Why I switched to Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

To a veteran user of other distributions, Fedora can be a challenge. Many things are not where you expect them to be. The default LVM volume allocations are a bit tricky. And packages including the kernel are frequently upgraded. So why switch after years of using other distributions?

In my case, for a variety of technical and political reasons, Fedora was the best option if I wanted to continue using Linux as my daily driver. If you are making the transition from another distribution, here are some observations and tips to get you started.

Read more

Why I switched to Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

As stated above Fedora has a software freedom commitment similar in spirit to that of Debian. This means that you should be able to give Fedora to anyone, anywhere without violating intellectual property laws. Any software which is either not licensed in a way that Fedora finds acceptable or that bares US patent encumbrances can be found in the rpmfusion.org repository.

After the install your next concern is undoubtedly configuring things and installing new packages. Fedora’s command-line package manager is dnf. It works as you would expect.

Note also that since rpm uses file-based dependency tracking instead of package-based dependency tracking, as almost all others do, there are very few traditional metapackages. There are, however, package groups.

Read more

Remembering Thomas Gilliard (satellit)

Filed under
Red Hat
Obits

I’m sad to report that Thomas Gilliard (satellit), who was a valued member of the QA team for many years, passed away last week. His wife contacted me with the news. Thomas was a regular and reassuring presence at QA and blocker review meetings and ran many thousands of tests since he first joined the team in 2009. He was particularly dedicated to testing our Sugar builds. We’ll miss him.

Read more

Also: Implementation of varlink support for libnmstate – GSoC’20 nmstate project

Red Hat changes certification rules in response to the coronavirus pandemic

Filed under
Red Hat

One of the best ways to get a job in tech is to have a certification. Yes, I know, you can do your work better than anyone with a certification, but try telling the human resources department that at a new company. Unfortunately, thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, it's harder than ever to take the tests you need to get or keep a certification. Red Hat, the Linux and cloud power, has an answer.

First, if you already have a Red Hat certification, which would expire between March 17, 2020, and December 31, 2020, it's been extended to January 1, 2021.

Next, Red Hat is launching remote certification exams for its four most popular certifications. These are...

Read more

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

           

  • The Red Hat story
  •        

  • Fedora Community Blog monthly summary: July 2020

    This is the second in what I hope to make a monthly series summarizing the past month on the Community Blog. Please leave a comment below to let me know what you think. Stats In July, we published 20 posts. The site had 6,463 visits from 4,128 unique viewers. 

  • Fedora rawhide – fixed bugs 2020/07
  • Red Hat Virtualization: The now and the next

    We’re excited to announce that Red Hat Virtualization 4.4, the latest update to our mature and trusted virtualization solution for traditional virtual machine (VM)-based workloads, will be generally available this week. As the established virtualization landscape shifts towards cloud-native technologies, Red Hat Virtualization has continued to provide the ability for businesses to deploy, configure and manage traditional workloads. With this latest release, Red Hat Virtualization is now rebased to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 and offers a more seamless integration with Red Hat OpenShift, providing a solution that can launch the next-generation of cloud-native applications while providing a foundation for VMs today.

    From traditional to cloud-native, virtualization here and now

    Red Hat is uniquely positioned to provide virtualization solutions for both traditional and containerized applications. With Red Hat Virtualization, we remain committed to providing customers robust and stable datacenter virtualization based upon KVM. 

    Based on RHEL 8.2, Red Hat Virtualization 4.4 inherits all of the stability, performance and security improvements that you trust for your most business critical workloads while adding new capabilities that make it even easier to manage a large virtual environment. We’ve also  improved observability with new dashboards for the Data Warehouse (DWH) showing performance and capacity of all your critical inventory. This leads to actionable results with unique analysis and trends of which workloads need attention, and when you need to add more hardware. Other improvements for virtualization admin include easier network configuration with NetworkManager. 

  • Creating an enterprise service request bridge between ServiceNow ITOM and Red Hat Ansible Tower

    At Keyva, we see clients in all phases of their automation journey. Some organizations are just starting out and automating domain lifecycle tasks, such as provisioning firewall rules or automating server builds, while others may be well down the path of creating self-service IT capabilities. In most cases, regardless of where a team is on its journey, they eventually want to arrive at the point where they can provide self-service IT capabilities to the teams and users that want to consume them. 

    At a basic level, self-service IT requests require two primary pieces of functionality: a request portal and automated request fulfillment. Let’s briefly look at both components.

  • Powering digital transformation at Royal Bank of Canada with Red Hat platforms

    Enterprises across the globe are looking to transform their operations and services to better align with current conditions. To succeed, they also need to adopt the latest technologies. Even the most traditional businesses - such as banks and financial institutions - need to use innovative approaches to deliver leading-edge solutions to their clients and partners.  

    As our customers begin to evaluate their digital transformation options, they are looking for a trusted partner to work with and a proven infrastructure platform to innovate upon. These are  often the key factors for success. Take Royal Bank of Canada (RBC), for instance. RBC is in the top 10 of global banks with over 86,000 employees and a complex IT environment.  As a leader in technology and innovation, RBC has been at the forefront of digital transformation. The bank has been recognized with multiple industry awards and honors, and continues to innovate to better serve their customers.

Journey of a Linux DevOps engineer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Red Hat
Server

After navigating the streets of Manhattan and finding a parking spot, we walked down the block to what turned out to be a large bookstore. You've seen bookstores like this on TV and in the movies. It looks small from the outside, but once you walk in, the store is endless. Walls of books, sliding ladders, tables with books piled high—it was pretty incredible, especially for someone like me who also loves reading.

But in this particular store, there was something curious going on. One of the tables was surrounded by adults, awed and whispering among each other. Unsure of what was going on, we approached. After pushing through the crowd, I saw something that drew me in immediately. On the table, surrounded by books, was a small grey box—the Apple Macintosh. It was on, but no one dared approach it—no one, that is, except me. I was drawn like a magnet, immediately grokking that the small puck-like device moved the pointer on the screen. Adults gasped and murmured, but I ignored them all and delved into the unknown. The year was, I believe, 1984.

Somewhere around the same time, though likely a couple of years before, my father brought home a TI-99/4A computer. From what I remember, the TI had just been released, so this had to be somewhere around 1982. This machine served as the catalyst for my love of computer technology and was one of the first machines I ever cut code on.

My father tells a story about when I first started programming. He had been working on an inventory database, written from scratch, that he had built for his job. I would spend hours looking over his shoulder, absorbing everything I saw. One time, he finished coding, saved the code, and started typing the command to run his code ("RUN"). According to him, I stopped him with a comment that his code was going to fail. Ignoring me, as I was only five or six at the time, he ran the code, and, as I had predicted, it failed. He looked at me with awe, and I merely looked back and replied, "GOSUB but no RETURN."

Read more

Also: Authorizing multi-language microservices with Louketo Proxy

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

20 CentOS Server Hardening Security Tips – Part 1

Filed under
OS
Red Hat

This tutorial only covers general security tips for CentOS 8/7 which can be used to harden the system. The checklist tips are intended to be used mostly on various types of bare-metal servers or on machines (physical or virtual) that provide network services.

However, some of the tips can be successfully applied to general-purpose machines too, such as Desktops, Laptops, and card-sized single-board computers (Raspberry Pi).

Read more

Also: 23 CentOS Server Hardening Security Tips – Part 2

Systemd 246 Released With Many Changes

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Systemd 246 is out today as the newest version of this dominant Linux init system and system/service manager. Systemd 246 has a lot of new functionality in time for making it into at least some of the autumn 2020 Linux distributions.

Read more

RHEL and CentOS 7 Receive Important Kernel Security Update, Patch Now

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) 7 and CentOS 7 operating system series received an important Linux kernel security and bug fix update that addressees four vulnerabilities and several other issues.

Probably the most important vulnerability patched in this new Linux kernel security update for RHEL and CentOS 7 systems is a flaw (CVE-2020-10757) discovered in the way mremap handled DAX Huge Pages, which could allow a local attacker with access to a DAX enabled storage to escalate their privileges on the system.

Also important is the buffer overflow (CVE-2020-12653) discovered in Linux kernel’s Marvell WiFi-Ex driver, which could allow a local user to escalate their privileges on the system. This was patched as well in the new kernel security update, but you can protect yourself by blacklisting the mwifiex kernel module.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

The 10 Best KDE Plasma Widgets for KDE Desktop Environment

If you were looking for the best KDE Plasma widgets for your Linux desktop, then you are in the right place. There is much debate about the fact of who implemented the widget feature first on a computer GUI. But nobody can deny that the widgets have brought a new era in the modern user interface. Most of the people rely on beautiful widgets for performing different tasks without opening the main instance of the program. Although Windows ditched their native desktop widgets feature with their Windows 8 for the sake of the live tiles. Linux still has a great library of widgets that are being maintained by the developer community. Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.7.13, 5.4.56, 4.19.137, and 4.14.192

  • Linux 5.7.13
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.7.13 kernel. All users of the 5.7 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.7.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.7.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.4.56
  • Linux 4.19.137
  • Linux 4.14.192

Games: Cursed Gem, Last Epoch, Jagged Alliance 2 and More

  • Cursed Gem is a pretty charming and amusing challenging platformer out now

    I have to admit, Cursed Gem is quite a nice surprise. Throwing in a little comedy into a challenging pixel-art platformer.

  • Action RPG 'Last Epoch' laughs at your free time with the biggest update ever

    Free time be damned, it's time to jump back into Last Epoch for another dozen hours or so because Eleventh Hour Games clearly don't want me to sleep tonight. On August 4 they released update 0.7.9, which they said was the "BIGGEST update in Last Epoch history". What's the big fuss about with this update? It splits off The Monolith of Fate end game into its own zone, with several islands each containing "a Timeline representing a reality that never was". Confused? Well, Last Epoch is an action RPG that involves a wee bit of time travel. As you progress and conquer timelines, you get all sorts of fancy rewards and you they're repeatable with different layouts. Sounds awesome.

  • Minesweeper but it's a rogue-lite with tons of features - DemonCrawl is out for Linux PC

    Oh no, I think DemonCrawl might just end up being my next 100 hour game and it's now available for Linux PC. Released originally in November 2019, the developer decided to support Linux to ensure people can get the best experience rather than relying on the Proton compatibility layer. Two weeks after announcing it and the Linux version has been released.

  • Jagged Alliance 2 game engine 'Stracciatella' has a big new release

    The community working to keep the classic Jagged Alliance 2 alive with the Stracciatella game engine have put out their first release in a few years. With the Stracciatella project their aim is to provide good cross-platform support, improve stability, fix bugs and provide a stable platform for mod development. It's a noble aim, especially when it's an old game long left behind by the original teams and in this case the original developer and publisher no longer even exist.

  • Master of Orion inspired open source 4x strategy FreeOrion has a new release

    Inspired originally by Master of Orion, the free and open source FreeOrion project has a brand new release. For the FreeOrion, this was a reasonably quick release considering they had another release back in February and they don't usually update too often. For a good reason this time though, as they've managed to do a major tech move from Python 2 to 3 to enable FreeOrion to stay up to date with modern code. That wasn't the only big change though.

  • Take an emotional trip through the mind in Into A Dream out now

    Into A Dream is a brand new release from indie developer Filipe F. Thomaz, telling a tale about diving into the mind of someone diagnosed with severe depression. You're quite literally exploring their mind too, using the power of medical science. You will be travelling through the mind of Luke Williams, as their last hope before "fading away". You need to find the events that led to their darkened mind, meeting family and friends (well, memories of them anyway) while finding a way to "trick him into letting you access his darker dreams and unveil the emotional, powerful and heartbreaking journey of his life".

  • Need another building and farming RPG? Verdant Village enters Steam Early Access

    Littlewood and Stardew Valley not enough for you? Need more farming, crafting and exploration? Verdant Village is now live in Early Access on Steam. "You've washed ashore in a foreign land. With nothing to your name other than a few tools you’ll have to learn how to live off the land. Explore, grow crops, and meet the locals. How you live is up to you. Can you create a new life for yourself in the small town of Amberglen?"—well, luckily for you the King seems nice and gave you an abandoned piece of land to call your own and it's up to you to bring it back to life.

LibreOffice 7.0 is Finally Available Now! Here are the Key Changes in this Major Release

The much awaited LibreOffice 7.0 is finally released. Check out the key changes in this new release and learn how to get the latest release on your Linux distribution. Read more