Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Red Hat

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Automating the implementation of system-wide crypto policies with RHEL System Roles

    Having properly configured and consistent cryptography settings across your Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) environment is a key part of system security. RHEL System Roles are a collection of Ansible roles and modules that are included in RHEL to help provide consistent workflows and streamline the execution of manual tasks.

    The crypto_policies RHEL System Role can help you quickly and easily implement system-wide crypto policies across your RHEL environment. The crypto_policies role can also be used to check the current status of system-wide crypto policies in your environment.

    In this post, we show you how you can utilize the crypto-policies RHEL System Role to automate the configuration across your RHEL environment.

  • Red Hat offers various free fundamentals and just-in-time learning opportunities

    It is no secret that organizations value candidates who demonstrate a commitment to staying abreast of new technologies and industry trends. A recent IDC whitepaper sponsored by Red Hat, "The Business Value of Red Hat Training," revealed that trained IT staff see greater productivity, risk mitigation and a reduction in IT infrastructure costs.

    When it comes to team onboarding, job readiness increased by 76% when new team members had already completed Red Hat training prior to joining, and by more than half (55%) in cases where they were trained as part of the onboarding process.

    Clearly, training and certification increases marketability of job candidates in a competitive employment landscape. Unfortunately, barriers persist in accessing quality training, as it can often present as cost-prohibitive for individuals who may not have educational opportunities sponsored by their employer. Red Hat Training and Certification is dedicated to making open source learning accessible to those who are interested in upskilling and improving their technical expertise and professional skills.

  • Try out our new API developer playground: Accelerating technology exploration and app development with Developer Playground on IBM API Hub – IBM Developer

    In February, we introduced the IBM API Hub as a way for developers to access trusted, secure API-enabled services and data. With access to these APIs, developers were able to more quickly build the solutions they needed.

    Since the introduction of the API Hub, we’ve heard from our developer community: Being able to discover and learn about APIs and try out their endpoints is good. Being able to easily play with the APIs within a free playground environment would be even better.

  • No-cost IBM Semeru Runtime Certified Edition 11 now available for all Java developers and deployments

    Following on from our recent introduction of the no-cost IBM Semeru Runtimes to develop and run Java applications, IBM is announcing the availability of IBM Semeru Runtime Certified Edition 11, previously known as IBM SDK, Java Technology Edition, 11.

    IBM Semeru Runtime Certified Edition includes the same OpenJDK class libraries and Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine as the Open Edition, and provides 100-percent compatibility. The Certified Edition has an IBM license, is Java TCK (Technology Compatibility Kit)-certified, and is available at no cost for you to write, build, and deploy Java applications in development or for production environments. It is available on Linux and AIX platforms for long-term support (LTS) Java releases, starting with Java 11.

    With the release of IBM Semeru Runtime Certified Edition, we are providing flexibility to IBM customers and Java users with the choice of licenses to use a Java runtime that is low and efficient in memory consumption, offers great performance, and is optimized for cloud and container-based deployments. If you prefer an IBM-licensed version with TCK certification, you can use the Certified Edition. If you prefer an open source (GPLv2 plus Classpath Exception) licensed version without need for TCK certification, you can use the Open Edition.

  • Thoth prescriptions for resolving Python dependencies

    Python offers a wealth of programming libraries, which often invoke functions from other libraries in complex hierarchies. While these libraries make it possible to develop powerful applications quickly, the ever-changing library versions often introduce conflicts that cause runtime or build-time issues. Thoth, an open source project developed within the Artificial Intelligence Center of Excellence (AICoE), is dedicated to alleviating this problem in Python programs. This article looks at Thoth prescriptions, a mechanism that you can use to avoid clashing library versions in your Python applications.

  • IT hiring: 4 ways to keep it human | The Enterprisers Project

    Companies have been using technology to recruit and hire employees for many years, but COVID has made digital recruiting indispensable. It is the only option when in-person interaction is limited, and it enables recruiters to search more broadly and efficiently as remote work becomes more standard.

    Meanwhile, today’s red-hot job market is forcing organizations to be even more proactive and specific in finding the people they need to meet near-term business objectives, address cultural diversity, and prepare for long-term success. Furthermore, we have entered a new phase of digital recruiting by using artificial intelligence to find and assess candidates before a human even enters the process.

    The result is that the hiring process is quickly becoming almost entirely digital. From recruiting to interviewing to onboarding, a company and a prospective or new employee may never see each other in person.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora: Snap ML, Red Hat Satellite, and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Use Snap ML to concurrently work on various machine learning projects – IBM Developer

    Snap ML adheres fully to the familiar scikit-learn API, offering ease of use. Data scientists using Python and scikit-learn functions can dramatically accelerate their applications by adding a single line of code, namely importing the Snap ML library. In addition, Snap ML interfaces seamlessly with scikit-learn data structures, offering users the broad spectrum of scikit-learn functions for tasks like data processing and feature engineering.

    For a team of data scientists to efficiently work concurrently on various machine learning projects, it’s crucial to be able to share resources effectively. With Watson Studio GPU Elastic Computing in IBM Cloud Pak for Data (available with the Watson Machine Learning Accelerator base service), GPU resources can be shared seamlessly across teams of data scientists. By combining Watson Studio, for fair resource sharing, and Snap ML, for high-performance model training and inference, teams of data scientists can experiment with data faster, leading to more insights and associated productivity increases.

  • Managing artifacts with Red Hat Satellite and JFrog Artifactory

    Red Hat Satellite is a systems management solution that can help an organization deploy, configure and maintain systems across multi-cloud environments and on-premises environments. Satellite provisions, monitors and remotely manages Red Hat Enterprise Linux deployments in a single centralized tool.

    JFrog Artifactory is a universal repository manager for binary life cycle management of artifacts, providing end-to-end management of artifacts throughout the software lifecycle process.

    The purpose of this post is to show how Artifactory’s repository management helps organize and distribute Satellite’s life cycle management capabilities to downstream layers to keep Enterprise Linux systems running with consistent packages across the enterprise.

  • Red Hat Insights and the delivery of a new security recommendation

    This is one story of how Red Hat Insights created a new recommendation to address a high impact vulnerability that might affect Red Hat customers. Red Hat Insights does this regularly for issues that involve Red Hat products, but what makes this one interesting is that it shows that Red Hat Insights can alert on high-visibility issues that are not delivered by Red Hat.

    In this case, a 3rd party vulnerability was made public on September 16. Red Hat developed and tested a detection mechanism for the issue, then created a series of new Insights recommendations to enable our customers to detect it.

    This answers two of the common questions we get about the Advisor service that is one of the services offered as a part of Red Hat Insights - how are new recommendations made, and how fast can they be created?

  • This is your final warning to re-certify, Red Hat tells tardy sysadmins

    Red Hat has told certified admins they need to re-certify by Christmas – or else.

    A Monday post by director of certification Randy Russell pointed out that in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Linux-slinging outfit extended the validity of certifications and allowed cancellation and/or re-scheduling of exams.

    The IBM-owned distro giant also launched a remote examination facility, so that even those under lockdown or who would rather not venture to an examination facility could take Red Hat's tests.

    Now the biz has decided that its months of deferrals and extensions must end. Current certifications will expire on December 31, 2021 unless renewed.

  • Beyond innovation: Digital Public Goods Alliance finds Fedora Linux to be a digital public good

    In the Fedora Project community, we look at open source as not only code that can change how we interact with computers, but also as a way for us to positively influence and shape the future. The more hands that help shape a project, the more ideas, viewpoints and experiences the project represents — that’s truly what the spirit of open source is built from.

    But it’s not just the global contributors to the Fedora Project who feel this way. Today, I’m pleased to say that Fedora Linux has been recognized as a digital public good by the Digital Public Goods Alliance (DPGA), a significant achievement and a testament to the openness and inclusivity of the project.

Fedora and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Community Blog: tmt hint 02: under the hood

    After making the first steps with tmt and investigating the provisioning options let’s now dive together a little bit more and look Under The Hood to see how plans, tests and stories work together on a couple of examples.

  • Distributed transaction patterns for microservices compared

    As a consulting architect at Red Hat, I've had the privilege of working on legions of customer projects. Every customer brings their own challenges but I've found some commonalities. One thing most customers want to know is how to coordinate writes to more than one system of record. Answering this question typically involves a long explanation of dual writes, distributed transactions, modern alternatives, and the possible failure scenarios and drawbacks of each approach. Typically, this is the moment when a customer realizes that splitting a monolithic application into microservices is a long and complicated journey, and usually requires tradeoffs.

    Rather than go down the rabbit hole of discussing transactions in-depth, this article summarizes the main approaches and patterns for coordinating writes to multiple resources. I’m aware that you might have good or bad past experiences with one or more of these approaches. But in practice, in the right context and with the right constraints, all of these methods work fine. Tech leads are responsible for choosing the best approach for their context.

    Note: If you are interested in dual writes, watch my Red Hat Summit 2021 session, where I covered dual write challenges in depth. You can also skim through the slides from my presentation. Currently, I am involved with Red Hat OpenShift Streams for Apache Kafka, a fully managed Apache Kafka service. It takes less than a minute to start and is completely free during the trial period. Give it a try and help us shape it with your early feedback. If you have questions or comments about this article, hit me on Twitter @bibryam and let’s get started.

  • Monthly roundup: Best of September 2021 | Red Hat Developer

    Autumn is here in the northern hemisphere, and so is the monthly roundup from Red Hat Developer! This month we're featuring tutorials for developers who want to learn Python or expand their Python toolbox, including updating to Python 3.9 on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). We also have an in-depth look at what's powering the new sub-millisecond GC pauses in OpenJDK 17, an introduction to Node.js circuit breakers for serverless functions, and a Spring developer's guide to getting started with Quarkus.

  • State of the Open Mainframe 2021

    The mainframe is a foundational technology that has powered industries for decades, including government, financial, healthcare, and transportation. With the help of surrounding communities, the technologies built around this platform have paved the way for the emergence of a new set of technologies we see deployed today. Notably, a significant number of mainframe technologies are profoundly embracing open source.

  • Run containers on your Mac with Lima [Ed: Red Hat thinks we're using Macs like its CEO?]

    Running containers on your Mac can be a challenge. After all, containers are based on Linux-specific technologies like cgroups and namespaces.

  • Digital transformation: 4 tips to improve your speed

    Digital transformation has become a buzzword, referring to anything from Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning to cloud migration. How your organization defines it depends on your unique goals and business objectives. But transformation is no longer optional – it is necessary to stay competitive in the modern economy.

    Many of us consider one large project (such as an application rewrite or a new platform launch) a digital transformation program. But true digital transformation involves a culmination of many programs, resulting in new ways of doing business that make it easier and more efficient to engage with your product and services.

    With this in mind, how do you drive success and generate repeatable and measurable results? Look at your business holistically, remember that success is measured over time, and ensure that your digital transformation initiatives are fundamentally aligned with creating business value.

  • Artificial intelligence (AI) at the edge: 3 key facts

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is moving from the realm of science fiction to widespread enterprise scalability. Even ten years ago, AI workloads were almost exclusively utilized by a small number of very profitable companies that had the resources to experiment and hire an extensive team of data scientists. Today, AI is used in a number of everyday tools, from language recognition to health care prediction and nearly every industry in between.

    AI is also now deployed at the edge, not just inside massive data processing facilities. That trend will continue in the coming years. Here are three things that executives in any field should know to capitalize on the change.

  • How we saved days of work with IT automation: A case study

    In 2020, I was working on a team automating the process of creating new virtual machine (VM) images for the latest Red Hat Satellite builds. Our goal was to automate VM deployments, snapshots, cleanup, and template creation. It sounds easy, but it was a lot of work. Automation was obviously needed to save time for our team, and we picked Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform as the automation interface. That's where this story begins.

    [...]

    This automation project transforms all the things you need to do in the Ansible Automation Platform user interface to the YAML serialization language. The settings are then executed with a single playbook command that takes your entire Ansible Automation Platform from a fresh install to a fully functional service.

    This is a huge win. Why? Once the configuration is written, the time it takes to stand up a new instance using the Configuration-as-Code method is less than 30 minutes. Prior to using this approach, it took us a day or longer (depending on who you asked to do it and their level of expertise) to deploy, set up, and configure a new instance and make it production-ready.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • A look at Red Hat Ceph Storage 5

    Red Hat Ceph Storage 5 is now generally available. This release includes support for NFSv4, additional disaster recovery capabilities for CephFS and RBD, as well as new security features and performance improvements.

  • Add finally tasks to Tekton pipelines – IBM Developer

    Tekton Pipeline 0.14 introduced the finally clause in the Pipeline specification. This section is ideal for running anything just before exiting the pipeline, such as cleaning up any acquired resources, sending notifications, rolling back deployments, and more.

    As defined on the Tekton website, the finally section takes a list of one or more tasks that are all executed in parallel after all tasks are finished executing — regardless of a success or a failure. The following code shows the finally section of a pipeline.

  • Developer diaries: Observability-driven development using Instana – IBM Developer

    In this episode of our Developer Diaries series, JJ & Chris do a bit of pair programming to show how developers can use Instana for observability-driven development.

  • podman build (user namespace) and Rename.

    podman build (user namespace) and Rename. It seems like Debian bullseye, if I run podman, it runs in user namespace mode if you run it inside a regular user. That's fine, but it uses fuse overlayfs driver. Now I am yet to pinpoint what is happening, but rename() is handled in a weird way, I think it's broken. os.Rename() in golang is copying the file and not deleting the original file.

  • Schedule soon: An update on Red Hat Certification exam extensions

    In response to the pandemic, Red Hat Training and Certification has allowed people to cancel or reschedule any previously scheduled classes or exams. Individual exam eligibilities have been extended multiple times since last year, and we have extended the period for which all certifications are considered current.

  • IT jobs: 4 tricky situations facing job hunters now | The Enterprisers Project

    It is a job hunter’s dream market right now, with job openings hitting record highs month after month. The New York Times recently called this “the job market we’ve been waiting for.” That’s especially true for technology professionals, more in-demand than ever as organizations continue to double down on digital transformation and other technology-enabled business initiatives.

    But a red-hot job market comes with its own challenges for job seekers. Combined with the potential of personal uncertainty (“Am I unhappy in my role, or just burned out?”) and macro ambiguity ("Is remote work here to stay?), tech pros on the hunt for new roles are encountering some thorny issues.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • 5 DevSecOps myths, explained

    New ways of doing things tend to beget new myths and misunderstandings about those emerging methods. A common example: As newer work processes and cultures get popularized, people commonly begin to tout a single correct way to implement them.

    In all likelihood, though, there’s more than one “right” way to do it – and that’s true for DevSecOps, as it was with DevOps before it.

    Demystifying DevSecOps, then, is actually a meaningful (if not wholly necessary in some organizations) step toward a successful implementation. That’s because DevSecOps, like DevOps, is as much a matter of people and culture as anything else.

    As Red Hat associate principal solutions architect Mike Calizo wrote over at opensource.com, “DevSecOps encourages security practitioners to adapt and change their old existing security processes and procedures. This may sound easy, but changing processes, behavior, and culture is always difficult, especially in large environments.”

  • Red Hat's Upstream Contributions Are Making For A Great Fedora Workstation 35 - Phoronix

    Fedora Workstation 35 will hopefully be out at the end of October (currently the beta is running behind schedule) and when it does ship it's once again at the bleeding-edge of Linux features. Fedora Workstation 35 is shaping up to be another great release for those interested in a feature-rich desktop experience.

    Fedora Workstation 35 test builds have been working out great on the few systems I've tried so far in the lab. More Fedora Workstation 35 testing and benchmarks will be coming up in the weeks ahead. In anticipation of the upcoming Fedora 35 Beta, Red Hat's Christian Schaller once again published a new blog post outlining some of the big changes on the Fedora Workstation side for this six-month update.

  • Rajeesh K Nambiar: A new set of OpenType shaping rules for Malayalam script

    TLDR; research and development of a completely new OpenType layout rules for Malayalam traditional orthography.

    Writing OpenType shaping rules is hard. Writing OpenType shaping rules for advanced (complex) scripts is harder. Writing OpenType shaping rules without causing any undesired ligature formations is even harder.

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 13 September 1300 UTC
  • Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 27 September 1300 UTC

Fedora and IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Community Blog: Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-37

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)!

    I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

  • Red Hat Is Hiring So Linux Can Finally Have Good HDR Display Support - Phoronix

    One of the areas where Linux has struggled on the desktop has been around HDR (high dynamic range) display support while that will hopefully be addressed in the coming months with Red Hat hiring an engineer to focus on that problem.

    Linux has struggled for years with HDR display support while NVIDIA has worked on the problem for their proprietary driver stack and proposing a DeepColor Visual extension for X.Org, there has been some HDR work in the DRM code, work by Intel on HDR support for Wayland/Weston along with other Intel HDR driver work, and AMD driver work too.

  • Changes to Bugzilla queries

    On 13 September 2021, Red Hat’s Bugzilla team released updates to Bugzilla that included new functionality for pagination. There is also a change to the default number of results with the bug search API to support this feature. The default is now 20 but can be adjusted to 1000 by using the limit/offset parameters.

    [...]

    The default Bug search API(REST/XMLRPC/JSONRPC) result in 20 bugs by default and users can change this by specifying the limit. The value of limit can be up to 1000 bugs. If you need results that are more than 1000, you can use the offset parameter. You can get default 1000 bugs by sending 0 as a limit parameter.

    Additionally, they have introduced “total_matches”, “limit”, and “offset” values in the response. These give the total number of bugs qualified for the query and the number of results in the response.

  • Monitoring vs. observability: What's the difference in DevOps? | The Enterprisers Project

    As software delivery becomes more complex and organizations work to scale their DevOps transformations, the need for observability increases. While observability plays an important role in any DevOps journey, it is often confused with monitoring. Although both are typically discussed in the same context, they are not one and the same.

    To help establish a clear picture, I asked SKILup Day participants and DevOps Institute ambassadors to clarify some of the key differences.

  • IT leadership: 3 lessons in failure, (im)patience, and teamwork | The Enterprisers Project

    Becoming a leader of a team or an organization isn’t something you simply wake up and do. It’s an evolution. It starts with “leading” yourself and driving yourself to make an impact toward a mission – toward something bigger than yourself. It takes relentless focus and passion.

    I’ve learned a lot of lessons over the years – sometimes by doing it right, sometimes by doing it wrong. Here are three that I keep coming back to.

  • The service provider edge: Building the case for an open source approach

    We’ve previously outlined the role of service providers in edge technology innovation and how constructing a robust ecosystem of partners multiply the opportunities to maximize functional and business opportunities while mitigating risk and investment.

    In order to support a broad variety of use cases spanning multiple industries, edge computing requires collaboration across suppliers, service providers and application and content partners. Additionally, with widely distributed networks and physical presence, they remain uniquely positioned to deploy edge computing infrastructures that are close to the user and tightly integrated with transport and access networks.

    The explosion and permutations of end-points, mobile applications, and distributed computing drives this need — all while meeting demanding functionality and quality of service expectations.

    How might the rapidly changing edge technology landscape benefit from the adaptability provided by open source solutions?

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Camel K Brings Apache Camel to Kubernetes for Event-Driven Architectures – The New Stack

    Applications have increasingly relied on event-driven architectures (EDAs) in recent years, especially with the advent of serverless and microservices. EDAs decouple an event from the subsequent actions that may follow, as opposed to traditional linear architectures, where an event might be processed in that same code. This decoupling makes EDA processes able to be independently scaled and, while EDA does not strictly require microservices or serverless, the respective loose coupling and the on-demand nature is a perfect fit.

    In the cloud native world, the focus might often be on the serverless side of things, with Knative or Lambda taking the spotlight, but, as the name might imply, event-driven architecture is nothing without events. Apache Camel K takes Apache Camel, the fundamental piece of enterprise integration software that first came around as a sort of codification of the 2003 book Enterprise Integration Patterns, and brings it to Kubernetes, providing EDA with a multitude of event sources, explained Keith Babo, Director of Product Management at Red Hat.

  • Automated Live - A Red Hat video collection

    Watch Colin and his trusty tech guru Sean discuss how the Red Hat® Ansible® Automation Platform can help improve your business processes and scale for the future.

  • Shenandoah in OpenJDK 17: Sub-millisecond GC pauses | Red Hat Developer

    Our primary motivation for the Shenandoah OpenJDK garbage collection (GC) project is to reduce garbage collection pause times. In JDK 12, we released the original Shenandoah garbage collector, which implements concurrent heap evacuation, which solved the major problem of cleaning (potentially large) heaps without stopping the application. This version was eventually backported to JDK 11. In JDK 14, we implemented concurrent class unloading, and in JDK 16, we added concurrent reference processing, both of which further reduced pause times in those garbage collection operations. The remaining garbage collection operation under pause was thread-stack processing, which we've solved in JDK 17.

    This article introduces the new concurrent thread-stack processing in Shenandoah GC. Processing thread stacks concurrently gives us reliable sub-millisecond pauses in JDK 17.

  • Applying DevSecOps practices to Kubernetes: security analysis and remediation

    This post explores implementing DevSecOps principles to improve Kubernetes security analysis and remediation across the full development life cycle.

  • The Enterprisers Project's 8th anniversary: What's next for CIO role? | The Enterprisers Project

    At the Enterprisers Project, we have a clear mission: Help CIOs and IT leaders solve problems. That means not only the technology challenges but also the leadership and career varieties. Our IT leadership community succeeds largely because of all your generosity – in sharing real-world lessons learned with your peers. And what unparalleled lessons they were in 2021.

Christian F.K. Schaller: Cool happenings in Fedora Workstation land

Filed under
Red Hat

Been some time since my last update, so I felt it was time to flex my blog writing muscles again and provide some updates of some of the things we are working on in Fedora in preparation for Fedora Workstation 35. This is not meant to be a comprehensive whats new article about Fedora Workstation 35, more of a listing of some of the things we are doing as part of the Red Hat desktop team.

NVidia support for Wayland
One thing we spent a lot of effort on for a long time now is getting full support for the NVidia binary driver under Wayland. It has been a recurring topic in our bi-weekly calls with the NVidia engineering team ever since we started looking at moving to Wayland. There has been basic binary driver support for some time, meaning you could run a native Wayland session on top of the binary driver, but the critical missing piece was that you could not get support for accelerated graphics when running applications through XWayland, our X.org compatibility layer. Which basically meant that any application requiring 3D support and which wasn’t a native Wayland application yet wouldn’t work. So over the last Months we been having a great collaboration with NVidia around closing this gap, with them working closely with us in fixing issues in their driver while we have been fixing bugs and missing pieces in the rest of the stack. We been reporting and discussing issues back and forth allowing us a very quickly turnaround on issues as we find them which of course all resulted in the NVidia 470.42.01 driver with XWayland support. I am sure we will find new corner cases that needs to be resolved in the coming Months, but I am equally sure we will be able to quickly resolve them due to the close collaboration we have now established with NVidia. And I know some people will wonder why we spent so much time working with NVidia around their binary driver, but the reality is that NVidia is the market leader, especially in the professional Linux workstation space, and there are lot of people who either would end up not using Linux or using Linux with X without it, including a lot of Red Hat customers and Fedora users. And that is what I and my team are here for at the end of the day, to make sure Red Hat customers are able to get their job done using their Linux systems.

Lightweight kiosk mode
One of the wonderful things about open source is the constant flow of code and innovation between all the different parts of the ecosystem. For instance one thing we on the RHEL side have often been asked about over the last few years is a lightweight and simple to use solution for people wanting to run single application setups, like information boards, ATM machines, cash registers, information kiosks and so on. For many use cases people felt that running a full GNOME 3 desktop underneath their application was either to resource hungry and or created a risk that people accidentally end up in the desktop session. At the same time from our viewpoint as a development team we didn’t want a completely separate stack for this use case as that would just increase our maintenance burden as we would end up having to do a lot of things twice. So to solve this problem Ray Strode spent some time writing what we call GNOME Kiosk mode which makes setting up a simple session running single application easy and without running things like the GNOME shell, tracker, evolution etc. This gives you a window manager with full support for the latest technologies such as compositing, libinput and Wayland, but coming in at about 18MB, which is about 71MB less than a minimal GNOME 3 desktop session. You can read more about the new Kiosk mode and how to use it in this great blog post from our savvy Edge Computing Product Manager Ben Breard. The kiosk mode session described in Ben’s article about RHEL will be available with Fedora Workstation 35.

Read more

Cool happenings in Fedora Workstation land

Filed under
Red Hat

Been some time since my last update, so I felt it was time to flex my blog writing muscles again and provide some updates of some of the things we are working on in Fedora in preparation for Fedora Workstation 35. This is not meant to be a comprehensive whats new article about Fedora Workstation 35, more of a listing of some of the things we are doing as part of the Red Hat desktop team.

One thing we spent a lot of effort on for a long time now is getting full support for the NVidia binary driver under Wayland. It has been a recurring topic in our bi-weekly calls with the NVidia engineering team ever since we started looking at moving to Wayland. There has been basic binary driver support for some time, meaning you could run a native Wayland session on top of the binary driver, but the critical missing piece was that you could not get support for accelerated graphics when running applications through XWayland, our X.org compatibility layer. Which basically meant that any application requiring 3D support and which wasn’t a native Wayland application yet wouldn’t work. So over the last Months we been having a great collaboration with NVidia around closing this gap, with them working closely with us in fixing issues in their driver while we have been fixing bugs and missing pieces in the rest of the stack. We been reporting and discussing issues back and forth allowing us a very quickly turnaround on issues as we find them which of course all resulted in the NVidia 470.42.01 driver with XWayland support. I am sure we will find new corner cases that needs to be resolved in the coming Months, but I am equally sure we will be able to quickly resolve them due to the close collaboration we have now established with NVidia. And I know some people will wonder why we spent so much time working with NVidia around their binary driver, but the reality is that NVidia is the market leader, especially in the professional Linux workstation space, and there are lot of people who either would end up not using Linux or using Linux with X without it, including a lot of Red Hat customers and Fedora users. And that is what I and my team are here for at the end of the day, to make sure Red Hat customers are able to get their job done using their Linux systems.

Read more

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Node.js circuit breakers for serverless functions | Red Hat Developer

    Using circuit breakers in Node.js applications helps mitigate failures when an application calls external services. For example, if the application calls a service to get a list of movies, and that service is not running, the circuit breaker helps the application fall back and find a different way to satisfy the request—or at least inform the user that the movie list is unavailable.

    In a previous article, I showed how to use circuit breakers with Node.js. Using circuit breakers with Red Hat OpenShift Serverless Functions introduces a new challenge, which we can solve with a slightly different implementation. I'll explain the issue first, then show you how to solve it.

  • Dow CIO: Digital transformation demands rethinking talent strategy | The Enterprisers Project

    At Dow, we’ve been on a digital transformation journey for several years now, but over the past 18 months, we’ve had the opportunity to fast-track the use of digital capabilities across all of our business functions. We are well beyond the days when IT was leveraged primarily to drive productivity – we view IT as a core piece of the business and driver of value growth.

    Earlier this year, we announced a $400 million investment to accelerate digital throughout the company.

    We identified the key areas we know will improve the customer and employee experience while delivering the most value.
    Collaborating with our businesses and operational groups, we identified the key areas we know will improve the customer and employee experience while delivering the most value. One area I’m excited about is material science innovation and product commercialization. How we interact with our customers and innovate has completely changed during the pandemic, with the help of digital capabilities. For instance, when big in-person trade shows were put on hold, we began leveraging online forums and hosting virtual events with hundreds of bench scientists at once instead of one-off meetings, enabling customers to watch the events whenever convenient for them.

  • Take the 2021 Enterprisers Project reader survey

    2021 marks the eighth anniversary of The Enterprisers Project. Each year, we ask our readers to share feedback on the work we’re doing.

    Your responses have shaped the topics we cover, how we deliver articles, and importantly, your feedback has helped us better align our articles to your interests.

  • IT talent: 5 mentoring best practices for the hybrid work era

    CIOs who embrace a coaching role say that it’s one of the most rewarding aspects of their jobs. But mentoring IT talent looks different in a hybrid work environment.

    We asked CIOs who recently won the 2021 Capital CIO of the Year ORBIE Awards how they are creating opportunities for IT talent to stand out and rise to the next level - and how that has or hasn’t changed during the pandemic. The awards were presented by the Capital CIO Leadership Association, a professional community that annually recognizes CIOs for their excellence in technology leadership.

    Read on for CIO coaching and mentoring tips you can borrow on your team.

  • Red Hat Satellite 6.9 with Puma Web Server

    Until Red Hat Satellite 6.8, the Passenger web/app server was a core component of Red Hat Satellite. Satellite used Passenger to run Ruby applications such as Foreman. Satellite 6.9 is no longer using the Passenger web server. The Foreman application (main UI and API server) was ported to use the Puma project. In this post, we’ll provide an overview of Puma and see how the application server switch affected performance of the Satellite server.

  • Using NGINX Ingress Controller on Red Hat OpenShift

    Network engineering for the high availability of application services is nothing new. However, as Kubernetes-based environments become more widespread, companies are beginning to look for innovative deployments across multiple types of infrastructures (on-premise, AWS, Azure, IBM Cloud). They then begin to ask what achieving successful application delivery looks like for those types of deployments.

    In our series on Davie Street Enterprises (DSE), we've used a fictitious company to illustrate how organizations have implemented protective measures against ransomware, transformed applications, and more.

    In this post, we’ll cover how Gloria Fenderson, DSE’s Senior Manager of Network Engineering, plans to use Red Hat OpenShift and the NGINX Ingress Controller to deliver applications on a cluster running across multiple types of underlying infrastructure. Both NGINX and Red Hat solutions are designed to enable the deployment of container-based environments across multiple clouds; we'll see now how easily this is accomplished.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

i.MX8M Nano based mini-PC features Wirepas mesh networking

SolidRun’s $221-and-up “SolidSense N8 IoT Compact” mini-PC runs Linux on an i.MX8M Nano Solo with GbE, WiFi/BT, USB, and a choice of LTE or PoE. You also get a choice of RS485 with CAN or BLE 5.0 with Wirepas Massive. The SolidSense N8 IoT Compact embedded system follows SolidRun’s i.MX6-based SolidSense N6 Edge Gateway, which similarly offers a bundle of the Wirepas wireless mesh software from Tampere, Finland based Wirepas. The wireless mesh software, which is now called Wirepas Massive, is pre-installed along with software defined radios (SDRs) on two of the four i.MX8M Nano based SolidSense N8 models. Applications include IoT tasks such as automation, asset tracking, security, and smart buildings. Read more

AMD Ryzen processors are getting a performance boost on Linux

Chip giant AMD has shared details about a new driver that promises to improve the performance of its Zen-based processors on Linux. According to reports, the new driver is the result of a joint collaboration between AMD and Valve, with the two companies toiling to enhance performance and power efficiency reportedly in preparation for the launch of the Steam Deck, Valve’s Zen 2-based take on portable gaming. Read more

Windowsfx is the Linux distribution Windows users have been looking for

Over the past 20 or so years, there always seems to be that one distribution everyone claims is the best to help Windows users transition to Linux. Most often those distributions are nothing more than Linux with a desktop that looks like Windows. Sometimes they do a decent job of mimicking Windows and sometimes not. But every so often something special pops up, a distribution that goes well beyond that extra mile to make Windows users feel right at home with Linux. Such is the case with Windowsfx. This Linux distribution is far from just a UI tweak to resemble another OS, it's perfectly tuned for Windows users. It looks like Windows 11, and it behaves like Windows 11... only it's Linux. For certain users, Windowsfx will be the absolute best of both worlds. Read more

The 3 Best Alternatives to Mandriva Linux

Mandriva Linux has been discontinued for a long time now. Check out these three alternatives to relive the pure Mandriva experience. Mandriva Linux is a fusion of Brazilian distribution Conectiva Linux and French distribution Mandrake Linux. It is developed by Mandriva S.A.; however, the company has not released any new version since 2011. Although the distro has not been updated for a long time and considering the features it offered, it’s a little difficult to undermine its existence. Mandriva might not exist any longer, but its memories are still functional in the form of different Linux distros, discussed below. Read more