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Red Hat

CentOS 8.0-1905

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OS
Red Hat
Interviews

CentOS is a community-run project which builds its distribution from the source code of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The project's goal is to provide a binary compatible, nearly identical experience to Enterprise Linux, but without the commercial support provided by Red Hat. This makes CentOS an attractive option for people who want to have a distribution with long-term support and the same technology Red Hat provides, but feel they do not need vendor support. I reviewed Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (RHEL 8), briefly covering the distribution's installer, software and settings management, several of its Workstation features, and a few of its server technologies, such as Cockpit. I ran into several issues during that experience - some of them relating to documentation, some dealing with permission problems, some due to missing applications in the official repositories - and I was curious to see if CentOS would provide the same experience, problems and all. One could assume so given CentOS uses the same source code, but CentOS has its own website and repositories so I thought it would be worth giving it a test run and seeing what differences, if any, I could spot. In particular, I planned to focus on the strengths and weaknesses I observed in the conclusion of my RHEL 8 review.

Before I get to my experiences with CentOS 8.0.1905, I feel it is worth mentioning that CentOS is now available in two branches: CentOS Linux, the traditional, fixed release operating system based on RHEL; and CentOS Stream. The new Stream branch is described as a rolling release platform which will fit in somewhere between Fedora and RHEL. The idea appears to be that software and concepts will get their initial testing in Fedora. Then Red Hat will fork a version of Fedora to be the basis of a future RHEL release. Changes and improvements that would normally be made internally within Red Hat prior to the next RHEL will become available for the public to try and comment on in CentOS Stream. Ideally, the plan here seems to be that this will give a larger portion of the community a chance to try new ideas and report issues, giving Red Hat more feedback and a chance to polish their commercial offering.

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Red Hat and IBM Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Why Red Hat supports standards and open source

    Red Hat may be synonymous with open source and the developer community, but the company also actively participates within industry standards processes. For example, it is working closely with the operator-led Common NFVi Telco Taskforce (CNTT), which was initiated in the LFN open source community but has now been embraced by the GSMA, as an attempt to harmonise on the many varied NFV infrastructure solutions and architectures. Furthermore, Red Hat supports the move for greater alignment in NFV software platform domain.

  • Overview of Node-RED 1.0 Release

    Low-code, visual-based programming environments are opening doors for new types of application developers. At the same time, new event-driven architectures are making such environments more responsive.

    Node-RED, a visual flow-based programming tool, is one such environment attuned to these new development styles. After years of refinement, the open source Node-RED recently hit maturity with a 1.0 release.

    I chatted with Nicholas O’Leary of IBM, who has pioneered the development of Node-RED. In this article, we’ll discover what this new release encompasses. We’ll also peek into the history of Node-RED, look into some fascinating IoT use cases and estimate the future Node-RED roadmap.

  • Girls Who Code wins IBM's first $50K Open Source Community Grant

    Girls Who Code were the winners of the first $50,000 IBM Open Source Community Grant. Girls Who Code is a nonprofit organization working to increase the number of women working in computer science.

    Girls Who Code helps girls to learn more about computer science through after-school classes and summer courses. Along with the advancement of IT knowledge, women also gain confidence in their capabilities.

  • IBM launches grant to promote diversity in the open source community

    Announced at this week's All Things Open conference in Raleigh, NC, the grant -- which will be awarded quarterly -- will see the winner receive $25k in cash and $25k in Cloud Credits in order to support their efforts dedicated to education and skill building for women, minorities, and/or under-served communities.

    The inaugural grant is going to Girls Who Code, a non-profit organization working to increase the number of women working in computer science.

    [...]

    Other finalists in this quarter's grant competition were Outreachy (Organized by the Software Freedom Conservancy), which sets up three-month paid internships on open source projects for people who ordinarily might not have those opportunities. And PyLadies, an international mentorship group of the Python Software Foundation, helping women become active in the Python open-source community.

  • Ex-IBM Director Joins Open-Source Blockchain Platform

    ennifer Trelewicz, the former Director of the Systems & Technology Laboratory at IBM, has just joined the open-source and fully decentralised blockchain software, Credits.

    According to AMB Crypto, Trelewicz has taken the post of Chief Business Officer, under which she is responsible for the external business sector of the firm.

  • IBM Group Sales Down Again But Cloud And Open Source Business Is Positive

    Third quarter results at IBM showed group sales were down 3.9% to $18bn, although revenue from the acquired Red Hat was up a handy 20%.

    That group drop though masked progress being seen in the cloud, with Cloud & Cognitive Software up 7.8% to $5.3bn. This part of the business includes cloud and data platforms that include Red Hat offerings, cognitive applications and transaction processing platforms.

    The Global Technology Services segment – that includes infrastructure and cloud services and technology support services – was down 4.1% to $6.7bn. And Global Business Services, which includes consulting, application management and global process services was up 2.2% to $4.1bn – with consulting actually up 5% when broken down.

  • IBM Poised for Another Sales Slide Despite Red Hat Deal: What to Watch

    International Business Machines Corp. is expected to report third-quarter earnings after the market closes Wednesday. The results, which follow a string of quarterly revenue declines, will be the company’s first since it closed its $34 billion purchase of open-source software giant Red Hat. Here’s what to look for:

Fedora IoT Review

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Red Hat
Reviews

With the rise in IoT use, we are witnessing a demand for ready-made operating systems to support smart device development. Currently, the race is between proprietary versions such as IoT Plug and Play by Microsoft and open source operating systems.

One such emerging open source player is Fedora which has a workstation that supports virtualization and containers. Fedora is also slated to release an Internet of Things edition called “Fedora IoT” in future.

Here is a review of the open source product’s support capabilities for IoT and relevant installation details.

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Red Hat: OpenShift, RHEL, Dependency Analytics, vDPA and More

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Expands the Kubernetes Developer Experience with Newest Version of Red Hat OpenShift 4

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced Red Hat OpenShift 4.2, the latest version of Red Hat’s trusted enterprise Kubernetes platform designed to deliver a more powerful developer experience. Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 extends Red Hat’s commitment to simplifying and automating enterprise-grade services across the hybrid cloud while empowering developers to innovate and enhance business value through cloud-native applications.

  • RHEL and Insights combo illuminates threats and spotlights performance for Red Hat systems

    When Red Hat Inc. officially rolled out its Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, or RHEL 8, operating system in May, the open-source software company also included Red Hat Insights with every subscription for the new release. Based on data supplied by one of the company’s top executives, that has proven to be a wise decision.

    Insights is a software as a service product that works from a rules-based engine to offer continuous connected analysis of registered Red Hat-based systems.

    “We’ve seen an 87% increase since May in the number of systems that are linked in,” said Stefanie Chiras (pictured), vice president and general manager of the RHEL Business Unit at Red Hat. “We’re seeing a 33% increase in coverage of rules-based and a 152% increase in customers who are using it. That creates a community of people using and getting value from it, but also giving value back because the more data we have the better the rules get.”

  • What’s new in Red Hat Dependency Analytics

    We are excited to announce a new release of Red Hat Dependency Analytics, a solution that enables developers to create better applications by evaluating and adding high-quality open source components, directly from their IDE.

    Red Hat Dependency Analytics helps your development team avoid security and licensing issues when building your applications. It plugs into the developer’s IDE, automatically analyzes your software composition, and provides recommendations to address security holes and licensing problems that your team may be missing.

    Without further ado, let’s jump into the new capabilities offered in this release. This release includes a new version of the IDE plugin and the server-side analysis service hosted by Red Hat.

  • Breaking cloud native network performance barriers

    Up until now we have covered virtio-networking and its usage in VMs. We started with the original vhost-net/virtio-net architecture, moved on to the vhost-user/virito-pmd architecture and continued to vDPA (vHost Data Path Acceleration) where the virtio ring layout was pushed all the way into the NIC providing wiresspeed/wirelatency to VMs.

    We now turn our attention to using vDPA for providing wirespeed/wirelatency L2 interfaces to containers leveraging kubernetes to orchestrate the overall solution. We will demonstrate how Containerized Network Functions (CNFs) can be accelerated using a combination of vDPA interfaces and DPDK libraries. The vDPA interfaces are added as a secondary interface to containers using the Multus CNI plugin.

    This post is a high level solution overview describing the main building blocks and how they fit together. We assume that the reader has an overall understanding of Kubernetes, the Container Network Interface (CNI) and NFV terminology such as VNFs and CNFs.

  • Top 5 stress reliefs for sysadmins

Fedora: IBus, F31 Delays, Cockpit and Foliate

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Red Hat
  • ibus-anthy 1.5.11 and anthy-unicode 1.0.0.20191015 are released

    ibus-anthy 1.5.11 is released and available in Fedora 30 or later.
    # dnf update ibus-anthy

    The default input mode is now Eisu (direct) mode but not Hiragana mode.

    Eisu mode now can load a user compose file of either $HOME/.config/ibus/Compose or $HOME/.XCompose although the system compose files has been already loaded.

  • IBus 1.5.21 is released

    IBus 1.5.21 is now released and available in Fedora 31.

    # dnf update ibus

    This release enhances the IBus compose features. The maximum number of the compose key sequences was 7. Also the output character was limited in 16 bit and only one character could be output so the latest emoji characters or custom long compose characters were not supported.
    The following is the demo.

  • Fedora 31 Release Held Up By Installer + DNF Bugs

    Fedora developers had been trying to ship Fedora 31 for their original release target of next Tuesday, 22 October, but that isn't going to happen due to remaining blocker bugs.

    At today's meeting they decided F31 is a "No-Go" due to open issues.

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 205

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 205.

  • Foliate - A simple and modern ebook viewer for linux

    Foliate viewer support epub, .mobi, .azw, and .azw3 files. Have few mode for you such as light, dark, sepia and invert theme mode.

    How to install? Luckly, they also release distribution package for Fedora (sudo dnf install foliate , Arch and Void linux (xbps-install -S foliate). For DEB based such a Ubuntu or Debian can be download on latest release page. For others distribution, just download the source code and build yourself. Else, just download from Flatpak.

Red Hat OpenShift 4.2: Kubernetes for the hybrid-cloud developer

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Red Hat

I've said before that Red Hat wants OpenShift to be the hybrid-cloud platform. Now, with its latest release, Red Hat OpenShift 4.2, Red Hat is doubling down on this plan.

As Ashesh Badani, Red Hat's senior vice president of Cloud Platforms, said in a statement:

"We continue to prioritize making the next generation of enterprise open-source technologies like Kubernetes even more accessible to developers while also keeping administrator priorities in balance. With these goals in mind, OpenShift 4.2 delivers on features to help customers accelerate application development and delivery."

In OpenShift 4.2, Red Hat makes it easier than ever to set up and manage Kubernetes -- the heart of the new hybrid-cloud model. With it, developers can focus on building enterprise applications without deep Kubernetes expertise.

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Also: OpenShift 4.2: The API Explorer

Red Hat: Puff Pieces, OpenStack, OpenShift, CodeReady and More

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat and SAS: Enabling enterprise intelligence across the hybrid cloud

    Every day 2.5 quintillion bytes of big data is created - this data comes from externally sourced websites, blog posts, tweets, sensors of various types and public data initiatives such as the human genome project as well as audio and video recordings from smart devices/apps and the Internet of Things (IoT). Many businesses are learning how to look beyond just data volume (storage requirements), velocity (port bandwidth) and variety (voice, video and data) of this data; they are learning how to use the data to make intelligent business decisions.

    Today, every organization, across geographies and industries can innovate digitally, creating more customer value and differentiation while helping to level the competitive playing field. The ability to capture and analyze big data and apply context-based visibility and control into actionable information is what creates an intelligent enterprise. It entails using data to get real-time insights across the lines of business which can then drive improved operations, innovation, new areas of growth and deliver enhanced customer and end user experiences

  • Working together to raise mental health awareness: How Red Hat observed World Mental Health Day

    Cultivating a diverse and inclusive workspace is an important part of Red Hat’s open culture. That’s why we work to create an environment where associates feel comfortable bringing their whole selves to work every single day. One way we achieve this mission is by making sure that Red Hatters who wish to share their mental health experiences, are met with compassion and understanding, but most importantly, without stigma. It is estimated that one in four adults suffers from mental illness every year.

  • Introducing Red Hat OpenShift 4.2: Developers get an expanded and improved toolbox

    Today Red Hat announces Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 extending its commitment to simplifying and automating the cloud and empowering developers to innovate.

    Red Hat OpenShift 4, introduced in May, is the next generation of Red Hat’s trusted enterprise Kubernetes platform, reengineered to address the complexity of managing container-based applications in production systems. It is designed as a self-managing platform with automatic software updates and lifecycle management across hybrid cloud environments, built on the trusted foundation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux CoreOS.

    The Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 release focuses on tooling that is designed to deliver a developer-centric user experience. It also helps cluster administrators by easing the management of the platform and applications, with the availability of OpenShift migration tooling from 3.x to 4.x, as well as newly supported disconnected installs.

  • A look at the most exciting features in OpenStack Train

    With all eyes turning towards Shanghai, we’re getting ready for the next Open Infrastructure Summit in November with great excitement. But before we hit the road, I wanted to draw attention to the latest OpenStack upstream release. The Train release continues to showcase the community’s drive toward offering innovations in OpenStack. Red Hat has been part of developing more than 50 new features spanning Nova, Ironic, Cinder, TripleO and many more projects.

    But given all the technology goodies (you can see the release highlights here) that the Train release has to offer, you may be curious about the features that we at Red Hat believe are among the top capabilities that will benefit our telecommunications and enterprise customers and their uses cases. Here's an overview of the features we are most excited about this release.

  • New developer tools in Red Hat OpenShift 4.2

    Today’s announcement of Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 represents a major release for developers working with OpenShift and Kubernetes. There is a new application development-focused user interface, new tools, and plugins for container builds, CI/CD pipelines, and serverless architecture.

  • Red Hat CodeReady Containers overview for Windows and macOS

    Red Hat CodeReady Containers 1.0 is now available with support for Red Hat OpenShift 4.2. CodeReady Containers is “OpenShift on your laptop,” the easiest way to get a local OpenShift environment running on your machine. You can get an overview of CodeReady Containers in the tech preview launch post. You can download CodeReady Containers from the product page.

  • Tour of the Developer Perspective in the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 web console

    Of all of the new features of the Red Hat OpenShift 4.2 release, what I’ve been looking forward to the most are the developer-focused updates to the web console. If you’ve used OpenShift 4.1, then you’re probably already familiar with the updated Administrator Perspective, which is where you can manage workloads, storage, networking, cluster settings, and more.

    The addition of the new Developer Perspective aims to give developers an optimized experience with the features and workflows they’re most likely to need to be productive. Developers can focus on higher level abstractions like their application and components, and then drill down deeper to get to the OpenShift and Kubernetes resources that make up their application.

    Let’s take a tour of the Developer Perspective and explore some of the key features.

Fedora at 15: Why Matthew Miller sees a bright future for the Linux distribution

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Red Hat
Interviews

Fedora—as a Linux distribution—will celebrate the 15th anniversary of its first release in November, though its technical lineage is much older, as Fedora Core 1 was created following the discontinuation of Red Hat Linux 9 in favor of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL).

That was a turbulent time in Red Hat history, and Fedora has had its own share of turbulence as well. Since becoming project leader in June 2014, Matthew Miller had led the Fedora.next initiative, intended to guide the second decade of the Fedora project. That initiative resulted in the creation of separate Fedora Workstation, Server, and Cloud editions—the latter of which has since been replaced with CoreOS—as well as the addition of an Internet of Things (IoT) edition.

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Red Hat and Fedora: syslog-ng, Ansible, Libinput and Fedora Community

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Red Hat
  • syslog-ng in two words at One Identity UNITE: reduce and simplify

    UNITE is the partner and user conference of One Identity, the company behind syslog-ng. This time the conference took place in Phoenix, Arizona where I talked to a number of American business customers and partners about syslog-ng. They were really enthusiastic about syslog-ng and emphasized two major reasons why they use syslog-ng or plan to introduce it to their infrastructure: syslog-ng allows them to reduce the log data volume and greatly simplify their infrastructure by introducing a separate log management layer.

    [...]

    When you collect log messages to a central location using syslog-ng, you can archive all of the messages there. If you add a new log analysis application to your infrastructure, you can just point syslog-ng at it and forward the necessary subset of log data there.

    Life at both security and operations in your environment becomes easier, as there is only a single software to check for security problems and distribute on your systems instead of many.

  • Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju: Fight or cooperation?

    Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju vs Chef vs SaltStack vs Puppet vs CloudFormation – there are so many tools available out there. What are these tools? Do I need all of them? Are they fighting with each other or cooperating?

    The answer is not really straightforward. It usually depends on your needs and the particular use case. While some of these tools (Ansible, Chef, StaltStack, Puppet) are pure configuration management solutions, the others (Juju, Terraform, CloudFormation) focus more on services orchestration. For the purpose of this blog, we’re going to focus on Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju comparison – the three major players which have dominated the market.

    [...]

    Contrary to both Ansible and Terraform, Juju is an application modelling tool, developed and maintained by Canonical. You can use it to model and automate deployments of even very complex environments consisting of various interconnected applications. Examples of such environments include OpenStack, Kubernetes or Ceph clusters. Apart from the initial deployment, you can also use Juju to orchestrate deployed services too. Thanks to Juju you can backup, upgrade or scale-out your applications as easily as executing a single command.

    Like Terraform, Juju uses a declarative approach, but it brings it beyond the providers up to the applications layer. You can not only declare a number of machines to be deployed or number of application units, but also configuration options for deployed applications, relations between them, etc. Juju takes care of the rest of the job. This allows you to focus on shaping your application instead of struggling with the exact routines and recipes for deploying them. Forget the “How?” and focus on the “What?”.

  • libinput's bus factor is 1

    Let's arbitrarily pick the 1.9.0 release (roughly 2 years ago) and look at the numbers: of the ~1200 commits since 1.9.0, just under 990 were done by me. In those 2 years we had 76 contributors in total, but only 24 of which have more than one commit and only 6 contributors have more than 5 commits. The numbers don't really change much even if we go all the way back to 1.0.0 in 2015. These numbers do not include the non-development work: release maintenance for new releases and point releases, reviewing CI failures [1], writing documentation (including the stuff on this blog), testing and bug triage. Right now, this is effectively all done by one person.

    This is... less than ideal. At this point libinput is more-or-less the only input stack we have [2] and all major distributions rely on it. It drives mice, touchpads, tablets, keyboards, touchscreens, trackballs, etc. so basically everything except joysticks.

  • Contribute to Fedora Magazine

    Do you love Linux and open source? Do you have ideas to share, enjoy writing, or want to help run a blog with over 60k visits every week? Then you’re at the right place! Fedora Magazine is looking for contributors. This article walks you through various options of contributing and guides you through the process of becoming a contributor.

  • Fabiano Fidêncio: Libosinfo (Part Sleepy

    Libosinfo is the operating system information database. As a project, it consists of three different parts, with the goal to provide a single place containing all the required information about an operating system in order to provision and manage it in a virtualized environment.

  • Τι κάνεις FOSSCOMM 2019

    When the students visited our Fedora booth, they were excited to take some Fedora gifts, especially the tattoo sticker. I was asking how many of them used Fedora, and most of them were using Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Kali Linux and Elementary OS. It was an opportunity to share the Fedora 30 edition and give the beginner’s guide that the Fedora community wrote in a little book. Most of them enjoyed taking photos with the Linux frame I did in Edinburgh...

    [...]

    I was planning to teach the use of the GTK library with C, Python, and Vala. However, because of the time and the preference of the attendees, we only worked with C. The workshop was supported by Alex Angelo who also traduced some of my expressions in Greek. I was flexible in using different Operating Systems such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Kubuntu among other distros. There were only two users that used Fedora. Almost half of the audience did not bring a laptop, and then I grouped in groups to work together. I enjoyed to see young students eager to learn, they took their own notes, and asked questions. You might see the video of the workshop that was recorded by the organizers.

  • Extending the Minimization objective

    Earlier this summer, the Fedora Council approved the first phase of the Minimization objective. Minimization looks at package dependencies and tries to minimize the footprint for a variety of use cases. The first phase resulted in the development of a feedback pipeline, a better understanding of the problem space, and some initial ideas for policy improvements.

Kubernetes at SUSE and Red Hat

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Red Hat
SUSE
  • Eirinix: Writing Extensions for Eirini

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit EU in the Netherlands, Vlad Iovanov and Ettore Di Giacinto of SUSE presented a talk about Eirini — a project that allows the deployment and management of applications on Kubernetes using the Cloud Foundry Platform. They introduced eirinix — a framework that allows developers to extend Eirini. Eirinix is built from the Quarks codebase, which leverages Kubernetes Mutating Webhooks. With the flexibility of Kubernetes and Eirini’s architecture, developers can now build features around Eirini, like Persi support, access to the application via SSH, ASGs via Network Policies and more. In this talk, they explained how this can be done, and how everyone can start contributing to a rich ecosystem of extensions that will improve Eirini and the developer experience of Cloud Foundry.

  • Building an open ML platform with Red Hat OpenShift and Open Data Hub Project

    Unaddressed, these challenges impact the speed, efficiency and productivity of the highly valuable data science teams. This leads to frustration, lack of job satisfaction and ultimately the promise of AI/ML to the business is not redeemed.

    IT departments are being challenged to address the above. IT has to deliver a cloud-like experience to data scientists. That means a platform that offers freedom of choice, is easy to access, is fast and agile, scales on-demand and is resilient. The use of open source technologies will prevent lockin, and maintain long term strategic leverage over cost.

    In many ways, a similar dynamic has played out in the world of application development in the past few years that has led to microservices, the hybrid cloud and automation and agile processes. And IT has addressed this with containers, kubernetes and open hybrid cloud.

    So how does IT address this challenge in the world of AI – by learning from their own experiences in the world of application development and applying to the world of AI/ML. IT addresses the challenge by building an AI platform that is container based, that helps build AI/ML services with agile process that accelerates innovation and is built with the hybrid cloud in mind.

  • Launching OpenShift/Kubernetes Support for Solarflare Cloud Onload

    This is a guest post co-written by Solarflare, a Xilinx company. Miklos Reiter is Software Development Manager at Solarflare and leads the development of Solarflare’s Cloud Onload Operator. Zvonko Kaiser is Team Lead at Red Hat and leads the development of the Node Feature Discovery operator.

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Ubuntu: AMD Support, NVIDIA GPU Operator and More

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Doesn't Ship With AMD Navi / Radeon RX 5700 Support Working, But Easy To Enable

    While last week's release of Ubuntu 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" is new enough for Radeon RX 5700 series support with the Linux 5.3 kernel and Mesa 19.2, it doesn't actually work out-of-the-box for these Navi graphics cards. While the principal driver components of the Linux kernel and Mesa3D (for RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan) are new enough with Navi support, Ubuntu 19.10's support isn't rounded out because its linux-firmware package isn't new enough for containing the necessary Navi firmware binaries required for the open-source driver usage. So if booting a clean Ubuntu 19.10 install with Radeon RX 5700, you are likely to just see a blank screen.

  • NVIDIA GPU Operator – Simplifying AI/ML Deployments on the Canonical Platform

    Leveraging Kubernetes for AI deployments is becoming increasingly popular. Chances are if your business is involved in AI/ML with Kubernetes you are using tools like Kubeflow to reduce complexity, costs and deployment time. Or, you may be missing out! With AI/ML being the tech topics of the world, GPUs play a critical role in the space. NVIDIA, a prominent player in the GPU space is one of the top choices for most stakeholders in the field. Nvidia takes their commitment to the space a step ahead with the launch of the GPU Operator open-source project at Mobile World Congress LA.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 601

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 601 for the week of October 13th – 19th, 2019.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Headlines, Ohio Linux Fest, GNU World Order and Extras

Android Leftovers