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Red Hat

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Awards Crossvale Commercial Application Platform Partner of the Year.

    Crossvale was presented with the 2018 North America Commercial Application Platform Partner of the Year award by Red Hat. The announcement was made at the Red Hat North America Partner Conference held in Maryland on October 10th.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #52 – OpenShift 3.11 and OpenShift Container Engine

    Last week Red Hat announced the general availability of OpenShift Container Platform 3.11. This is an important release because it incorporates the first wave of technology from the CoreOS acquisition. This includes new visibility for Operations teams through the Cluster Console and integrated Prometheus monitoring and Grafana dashboards. It also added support for a number of Operators, both from Red Hat and ISV partners (supporting the Operator Framework). This is important, as Operators will continue to play a more critical role in both the OpenShift platform, as well as for applications running on OpenShift. Finally, we discussed the recently released OpenShift Container Engine, and how it offers flexibility for customers that want Enterprise Kubernetes from OpenShift, but may want flexibility in certain areas of their deployments.

  • Knative: Building your Serverless Service

    In the Part-1 of Knative Serving blog series, you were introduced on how to build and deploy your first serverless service using Knative Serving. In this blog you will be introduced to another Knative component called Knative Build.

  • Agile Integration: Enterprise integration from a necessary evil to building competitive advantage

    Business success can be increasingly based on an organization’s ability to react to change. As new disruptive players enter markets and technology upends what consumers expect, organizations often need to change plans in shorter cycles. Modern software architectures and processes can help make organizations more effective at dealing with this change and emerge as leaders in their markets.

    "Planning as we know it is dead," was the keynote message delivered by Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat president and CEO, at the 2017 Red Hat Summit. "Planning harder in a less-known environment just isn’t the answer." In today’s world, the pace of innovation and disruption is accelerating in business. With that comes change, which can jar or break plans quickly and, in some instances, be extremely costly. Hence, the ability to react to change quickly can be a necessity. Enterprise integration can be at the heart of an organization's IT architecture. It may be necessary. But it is often a bottleneck.

  • Red Hat CEO Whitehurst sells $709000 in Hatter shares

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat News and Developments

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Red Hat
  • The GNOME Infrastructure is moving to Openshift

    The cluster consists of 3 master nodes (controllers, api, etcd), 4 compute nodes and 2 infrastructure nodes (internal docker registry, cluster console, haproxy-based routers, SSL edge termination). For the persistent storage we’re currently making good use of the Red Hat Gluster Storage (RHGS) product that Red Hat is kindly sponsoring together with the Openshift subscriptions. For any app that might require a database we have an external (as not managed as part of Openshift) fully redundant, synchronous, multi-master MariaDB cluster based on Galera (2 data nodes, 1 arbiter).

    The release we’re currently running is the recently released 3.11, which comes with the so-called “Cluster Console”, a web UI that allows you to manage a wide set of the underlying objects that previously were only available to the oc cli client and with a set of Monitoring and Metrics toolings (Prometheus, Grafana) that can be accessed as part of the Cluster Console (Grafana dashboards that show how the cluster is behaving) or externally via their own route.

  • OpenShift Commons Gathering Seattle Announces Speakers from Intel, GE, Progressive, HealthPartners, TicketMaster, USAA and more!

    The OpenShift Commons Gathering brings together experts from all over the world to discuss the container technologies, best practices for cloud-native application developers and the open source software projects that underpin the OpenShift ecosystem to help take us all to the next level in cloud-native computing. This final Gathering of 2018 will feature 400+ developers, project leads, cloud architects, DevOps professionals, sysadmins, and cloud-native practitioners coming together to explore the next steps in making container technologies successful and secure at scale.

  • Modernize your application deployment with Lift and Shift

    For many software modernization projects, it’s all about learning to love, lift, and shift. No, wait. It’s all about learning to love lift and shift. The basic idea behind lift and shift is to modernize how an existing application is packaged and deployed. Because it’s not about rewriting the application itself, lift and shift is typically quick to implement.

    Modern development environments rely on containers for packaging and deployment. A modern environment also uses a continuous integration / continuous deployment (CI/CD) system that automatically builds, tests, and deploys an application whenever its source code changes.

  • Istio on OpenShift: Technology Preview 2 of Service Mesh Now Available

    It’s been a few weeks since the release of the first tech preview of Istio on OpenShift. Since then a lot has happened, and we are happy to announce the availability of our second tech preview release.

    In this release we are adding a whole new user interface from the upstream Kiali project. The Kiali user interface can help Istio users understand what’s happening in their service mesh, canl show how the various components are connected, and can help to detect issues (HTTP 500, pod not started, misconfigurations) to better fix those.

  • Insider Selling: Red Hat Inc (RHT) EVP Sells 960 Shares of Stock
  • Featured Stock: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Scout Investments Inc. Acquires 3,034 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Get "The Art of Modern Application Development" the Red Hat way - eBook, free [Ed: Apparently a paid-for ad]

Fedora 29 Is Blocked From Release Due To 11 Open Bugs

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Fedora 29 will not be managing to deliver its final release right on time due to lingering blocker bugs.

At the first Fedora 29 Final meeting today it was declared a No-Go for releasing next week on 23 October as had been planned.

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Red Hat News

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat Leftovers

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Fedora: Flock, Flatpaks, Fedora/RISC-V and More

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  • CommOps takeaways from Flock 2018

    The annual Fedora contributor conference, Flock, took place from August 8-11, 2018. Several members of the Community Operations (CommOps) team were present for the conference. We also held a half-day team sprint for team members and interested people to participate and share feedback with the team.

  • Flatpaks, sandboxes and security

    Last week the Flatpak community woke to the “news” that we are making the world a less secure place and we need to rethink what we’re doing. Personally, I’m not sure this is a fair assessment of the situation. The “tl;dr” summary is: Flatpak confers many benefits besides the sandboxing, and even looking just at the sandboxing, improving app security is a huge problem space and so is a work in progress across multiple upstream projects. Much of what has been achieved so far already delivers incremental improvements in security, and we’re making solid progress on the wider app distribution and portability problem space.

    Sandboxing, like security in general, isn’t a binary thing – you can’t just say because you have a sandbox, you have 100% security. Like having two locks on your front door, two front doors, or locks on your windows too, sensible security is about defense in depth. Each barrier that you implement precludes some invalid or possibly malicious behaviour. You hope that in total, all of these barriers would prevent anything bad, but you can never really guarantee this – it’s about multiplying together probabilities to get a smaller number. A computer which is switched off, in a locked faraday cage, with no connectivity, is perfectly secure – but it’s also perfectly useless because you cannot actually use it. Sandboxing is very much the same – whilst you could easily take systemd-nspawn, Docker or any other container technology of choice and 100% lock down a desktop app, you wouldn’t be able to interact with it at all.

  • Fedora/RISC-V now mirrored as a Fedora “alternative” architecture
  • PSA: System update fails when trying to remove rtkit-0.11-19.fc29

Fedora: A Look at Fedora Workstation 29 and NeuroFedora Update

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  • Fedora Workstation 29 Is Looking Up To Be Another Impressive Release, Looking Great

    In addition to Ubuntu 18.10 releasing soon, Fedora 29 is set to be release by month's end if all goes well.

    I have been running the latest Fedora 29 packages on a number of test boxes and overall it's been running great. Yes, for the past few years I've been back to running Fedora on my main production system (after a few years of a falling out but besides that being a big user going back to the Fedora Core days), but Fedora 29 in particular is feeling really quite polished and great.

  • NeuroFedora update: week 41

    In week 41, we finally announced NeuroFedora to the community on the mailing list and on the Fedora Community Blog. So, it is officially a thing!

    There is a lot of software available in NeuroFedora already. You can see the list here. If you use software that is not on our list, please suggest it to us using the suggestion form.

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More in Tux Machines

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.

CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator
    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document. In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.
  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements
    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.
  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure
    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing. The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

ODROID 'Hacker Board'

  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen
    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2. In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.
  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board
    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe. When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.