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Red Hat

New CentOS Atomic Host Update Released with Linux Kernel 3.10, Docker 1.10.3-46

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Red Hat

CentOS Project's Jason Brooks is back again with some awesome news for those interested in using the CentOS Atomic Host operating system designed for running Docker containers on top of the RHEL-based CentOS Linux 7 platform.

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Red Hat goes to work on OpenStack network convergence

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Red Hat

Red Hat has fully embraced OpenStack’s Neutron in a convergence-targeted virtualisation package.

The Linux shop has released Red Hat Virtualisation 4, a package that subtly drops the reference to “Enterprise” held up until and including version 3.5

The intent seems to be for Red Hat’s virtualized Linux stack to become the platform for convergence, as opposed to merely a server density play.

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Red Hat and Fedora

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat CEO Tells LinuxCon Crowd What Makes Linux Stand Out

    Five years ago, on the 20th anniversary of Linux, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst delivered a keynote address at LinuxCon. Today, he returned to the LinuxCon stage here to help celebrate the 25th anniversary of Linux, bringing a message not all that different from the one he shared in 2011.

    The Linux world, however, is a different place in 2016, with one-time mortal foe Microsoft now embracing the open-source model. Whitehurst briefly shared the keynote stage with Wim Coekaerts, corporate vice president of enterprise open source at Microsoft, which is something that wouldn't have happened five years ago. Red Hat and Microsoft today partner at multiple levels, as the message and value of open source has continued to expand.

    During his keynote, Whitehurst said that it's hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about the history of Linux and vice versa, as the two are very much intertwined. Back in the 1990s when Red Hat got started a few years after Linux's birth, Whitehurst said his company didn't have a great business model. At one point, Red Hat actually tried to sell shrink-wrapped boxed software at big box retailers. Around 2001, Red Hat first introduced the enterprise open-source software model that is the core of the company's business today. The basic idea is to bundle open-source software together, test and certify the software, and then provide multiple years of enterprise-grade support.

  • Option Market: Red Hat Inc Risk Hits A Deteriorated Level
  • Building Fedora Rawhide Images with Imagefactory
  • Fedora 24 Release Party in Singapore

    As you might know, Fedora released its 24th version at the end of June! Recently, the Fedorans in Singapore had a party to celebrate the release. The release party was not only to celebrate its release, but also to commemorate Fedora’s open source journey so far. We invited people from different diverse background to join us for a night of fun and open conversations (Singapore is a cosmopolitan country!)

Red Hat News

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Red Hat

Fedora News

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Red Hat
  • Fedora 25 Linux OS to Arrive on November 15, Ship with Wayland by Default

    The Fedora Project is currently working very hard on the next major version of the popular GNU/Linux computer operating system, Fedora 25, bringing you all the latest and modern technologies.

    Wayland is a modern technology, the next generation display server designed as a drop-in replacement for the old X.Org Server or X11 as many of you out there might want to call the display server almost all GNU/Linux distributions are currently using by default. But there are many security-released issues with X11 that for some reason can't be fixed, so it's time for the open-source ecosystem to adopt Wayland.

  • New role as Fedora Magazine editor in chief

    Today, I am pleased to announce my new role as the Fedora Magazine editor-in-chief. After deciding to shift focus to other areas of the Fedora Project, I am receiving the torch from Ryan Lerch. Ryan has helped lead the Magazine, edit pieces from other contributors, contribute his own pieces, and decide strategic direction for the Magazine.

    He leaves big shoes to fill, but I hope to offer my own leadership, creativity, and direction in coming years as well. I’d like to thank both Ryan, Paul Frields, and Remy DeCausemaker for their mentorship and guidance towards becoming involved with Fedora and the Magazine. I’m excited to have the opportunity to help guide the Fedora Magazine in how it fits with the rest of Fedora.

  • FOSS Wave: Delhi, India

    After the introductory session on FOSS, we went ahead with our agenda and introduced the Fedora Project and the community behind it: what the Fedora Project is, what its mission is, and how the participants can get started with Fedora. The participants were guided upon how they can create their identity on the Fedora Project by signing up on FAS. They could then use that identity to get access to various Fedora applications and resources. The session on Fedora moved on with the introduction on how the contributors can get to the mailing list and introduce themselves to the community. There, they can get help about starting their contributions. The main focus during the session on Fedora was to introduce the participants to the Fedora Quality Assurance (QA) team and release validation testing.

Almost open: BIOS and firmware update tips for Linux users

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Linux
Red Hat

I suppose I'm lucky in that for more than 10 years my primary work environment has been Linux-based, yet all to often I've been forced to dig out a DOS or Windows image because I need to patch some BIOS device firmware. These days I don't own anything than has a valid Windows license, and even my 2008 white MacBook has spent most of its life running either Ubuntu or Fedora. Luckily most hardware manufacturers have started to provide bootable images for patching system firmware, and for enterprise-grade hardware they even provide Linux-ready tools. In this article, I'll walk through my recent firmware update on Linux, and I'll share a few recommendations based on that experience.

In the consumer/prosumer landscape there has been a shift toward UEFI-based systems for desktops and laptops, and along the way many manufacturers appear to have removed the option for the BIOS to update from a USB Stick. Historically we'd only see firmware updates for enterprise-class spinning rust (hard drives), but many SSD manufacturers are also providing regular firmware updates for consumer-class devices. Whilst we often should stand by the old adage "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," I'm a strong believer when standing up a new environment to make sure all my firmware is current. So begins my journey...

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Also: THE BIG LIE About Operating Systems

Trying Out Fedora 25 With Wayland, Early Benchmarks Included

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

With the news from Friday that Fedora 25 will run Wayland by default I loaded up the current Fedora 25 development packages on a test system this weekend and I used that as my primary system for all of my business/production work this weekend. It went well and included are some early gaming benchmarks of Fedora 25 Workstation GNOME on Wayland and X.Org.

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DNF 1.1.10 and DNF-PLUGINS-CORE 0.1.21-3 Released

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Red Hat

Another stability release of DNF and DNF-PLUGINS-CORE has been made. This release should eliminate the most critical bugs, especially the Unicode tracebacks and COPR plugin should work in Korora again. More information about the release can be found in DNF and plugins release notes.

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PuppEX Linux Live CD Now Based on Puppy Xenial, Compatible with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

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KDevelop 5.0 Open-Source IDE Officially Released with New C/C++ Language Support

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Open source drone controller has an FPGA-enhanced brain

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Linux Kernel 3.16.37 LTS Is a Massive Update with Tons of Networking Changes

Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 3.2.82 LTS, maintainer Ben Hutchings proudly informed the community about the availability of the thirty-seventh maintenance update to the Linux 3.16 LTS kernel series. Read more