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Debian

Tails 3.14 is out

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GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Debian: DebConf19, David Kalnischkies and Joey Hess

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Debian
  • Lenovo Platinum Sponsor of DebConf19

    With this commitment as Platinum Sponsor, Lenovo is contributing to make possible our annual conference, and directly supporting the progress of Debian and Free Software, helping to strengthen the community that continues to collaborate on Debian projects throughout the rest of the year.

  • David Kalnischkies: Newbie contributor: A decade later

    Time flies. On this day, 10 years ago, a certain someone sent in his first contribution to Debian in Debbugs#433007: --dry-run can mark a package manually installed (in real life). What follows is me babbling randomly about what lead to and happened after that first patch.

    That wasn't my first contribution to open source: I implemented (more like copy-pasted) mercurial support in the VCS plugin in the editor I was using back in 2008: Geany – I am pretty sure my code is completely replaced by now, I just remain being named in THANKS, which is very nice considering I am not a user anymore. My contributions to apt were coded in vim(-nox) already.

  • Joey Hess: 80 percent

    I added dh to debhelper a decade ago, and now Debian is considering making use of dh mandatory. Not being part of Debian anymore, I'm in the position of needing to point out something important about it anyway. So this post is less about pointing in a specific direction as giving a different angle to think about things.

    debhelper was intentionally designed as a 100% solution for simplifying building Debian packages. Any package it's used with gets simplified and streamlined and made less a bother to maintain. The way debhelper succeeds at 100% is not by doing everything, but by being usable in little pieces, that build up to a larger, more consistent whole, but that can just as well be used sparingly.

    dh was intentionally not designed to be a 100% solution, because it is not a collection of little pieces, but a framework. I first built an 80% solution, which is the canned sequences of commands it runs plus things like dh_auto_build that guess at how to build any software. Then I iterated to get closer to 100%. The main iteration was override targets in the debian/rules file, to let commands be skipped or run out of order or with options. That closed dh's gap by a further 80%.

Programming: ML, RcppArmadillo, Lightweight Java Game Library (LWJGL), Rust and Debian

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Development
Debian
  • Top 20 Best ML Algorithms For Both Newbies and Professionals

    When I started to work with machine learning problems, then I feel panicked which algorithm should I use? Or which one is easy to apply? If you are as like me, then this article might help you to know an overview of machine learning algorithms.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.9.400.3.0

    The recent 0.9.400.2.0 release of RcppArmadillo required a bug fix release. Conrad follow up on Armadillo 9.400.2 with 9.400.3 – which we packaged (and tested extensively as usual). It is now on CRAN and will get to Debian shortly.

    Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 597 other packages on CRAN.

  • LWJGL 3.2.2 Updates Against Vulkan 1.1, Other New Packages

    For those making use of the Lightweight Java Game Library (LWJGL) for cross-platform libraries common to games/multimedia software, version 3.2.2 is now available with nearly a half year worth of updates.

  • Rust doubly-linked list

    I have now released (and published on crates.io) my doubly-linked list library for Rust.

    Of course in Rust you don't usually want a doubly-linked list. The VecDeque array-based double-ended queue is usually much better. I discuss this in detail in my module's documentation.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (March and April 2019)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

    Jean-Baptiste Favre (jbfavre)
    Andrius Merkys (merkys)
    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    Christian Ehrhardt
    Aniol Marti
    Utkarsh Gupta
    Nicolas Schier
    Stewart Ferguson
    Hilmar Preusse
    Congratulations!

Debian: #debian-meeting revival and Debian Buster and Wayland

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Debian
  • #debian-meeting revival

    As part of my DPL campaign I suggested that we have more open community meetings, and also suggested that we have more generic open team meetings in a well-known public channel. Fortunately, that idea doesn’t really need a DPL to implement it, and on top of that our new DPL (Sam Hartman) supports the initiative. We do have a #debian-meeting IRC channel that’s been dormant for years, so we’re reviving that for these kind of meetings.

    Today we had our first session, it was the first meeting on that channel since 2011 (almost 8 years!). The topic was “Meet the new DPL and ask him anything!”. It was announced on some of the Debian channels, most notably on Bits from Debian, I played it careful by not announcing too widely because we don’t yet have much in the way of moderation and I think if we had to deal with many trolls it would’ve been tough. This was also really early for people in the Americas (6am East Coast) so future sessions will be staggered across different times and days of the week. The session was a bit quieter than I expected, but Sam gave really nice answers and I learned a few new things so it all worked out ok, I would rather start small and build on it than it have been too chaotic and a mess. In 2017 I started a community channel called #debian-til (TIL standing for “Today I Learned”). The idea is that people share interesting Debian related things that they have learned, and it started with a hand full of people and took a year to grow to a hundred, but I’m very happy with how that worked out and how the culture of that channel has evolved, I’m hoping that #debian-meeting can also grow and evolve to be something useful and fun for our community, instead of only a channel to schedule meetings in.

  • Debian Buster and Wayland

    The next release of Debian OS (codename "Buster") is due very soon. It's currently in deep freeze, with no new package updates permitted unless they fix Release Critical (RC) bugs. The RC bug count is at 123 at the time of writing: this is towards the low end of the scale, consistent with being at a late stage of the freeze.

    As things currently stand, the default graphical desktop in Buster will be GNOME, using the Wayland desktop technology. This will be the first time that Debian has defaulted to Wayland, rather than Xorg.

    For major technology switches like this, Debian has traditionally taken a very conservative approach to adoption, with a lot of reasoned debate by lots of developers. The switch to systemd by default is an example of this (and here's one good example of LWN coverage of the process we went through for that decision).

  • Debian 10 "Buster" Currently Defaults To GNOME On Wayland, But That Still Could Change

    As it stands now the upcoming release of Debian 10 "Buster" will provide a default desktop of the GNOME Shell running atop Wayland, but that still could change with a Debian developer suggesting the experience might not be good enough for this next release that they would be better off still using the X.Org Server.

    While some distributions like Fedora and RHEL8 are defaulting to GNOME atop Wayland, others like Ubuntu are preferring GNOME on X.Org for the time being due to Wayland bugs, driver/GPU compatibility concerns, and other issues. With Debian Buster, they had been following the advice of the Debian GNOME team that the default GNOME session should be Wayland in place of the X.Org Server.

Debian: OpenStack-cluster-installer in Buster and Derivative Elive

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Debian
  • OpenStack-cluster-installer in Buster

    As per the package description and the package name, OCI (OpenStack Cluster Installer) is a software to provision an OpenStack cluster automatically, with a “push button” interface. The OCI package depends on a DHCP server, a PXE (tftp-hpa) boot server, a web server, and a puppet-master.

    Once computers in the cluster boot for the first time over network (PXE boot), a Debian live system squashfs image is served by OCI (served by Apache), to act as a discovery image. This live system then reports the hardware features of the booted machine back to OCI (CPU, memory, HDDs, network interfaces, etc.). The computers can then be installed with Debian from that live system. During this process, a puppet-agent is configured so that it will connect to the puppet-master of OCI. Uppong first boot, OpenStack services are then installed and configured, depending on the server role in the cluster.

    OCI is fully packaged in Debian, including all of the Puppet modules and so on. So just doing “apt-get install openstack-cluster-installer” is enough to bring absolutely all dependencies, and no other artifact are needed. This is very important so one only needs a local Debian mirror to install an OpenStack cluster. No external components must be downloaded from internet.

  • ELIVE 3.0.4 STABLE UPDATE

    Elive 3.0 has been updated, and it will probably be the last updated build for the 3.0 release!

    In the last few months I have been deeply working on the next future versions of Elive, which will support things like Secure Boot and UEFI, with 64bit available builds and based in Debian Buster, all these things are simply… amazing! I hope to make the next beta versions publicly available soon with also including a working installer that will have extra features! I didn’t wanted to publicly announce anything until now because I’m a meticulous perfectionist who wants to verify that most of the things are correctly working before giving any promise.

  • IBM's Red Hat Deal, NuoDB Operator Now Has Red Hat OpenShift Operator Certification, Krita 4.2.0 Alpha Released, Elive 3.0 Update, UBports Announces Ubuntu Touch OTA-9 and Fedora Kernel 5.1 Test Week Starts Monday

    Elive 3.0 has been updated, and this should be the last update before the 3.0 release.

Norbert Preining Releases TeX Live 2019 and Puts it in Debian GNU/Linux

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Debian
  • Norbert Preining: TeX Live 2019 released

    The DVDs are already being burnt and will soon be sent to the various TeX User groups who ordered. The .iso image is available on CTAN, and the net installer will pull all the newest stuff. Currently we are working on getting those packages updated during the freeze to the newest level in TeX Live.

  • TeX Live 2019 in Debian

    All the changes listed in the upstream release blog apply also to the Debian packages, but we have rebuilt binaries from the sources in current svn, which means there are several fixes for dvipdfmx, and updates to the ptex family of engines.

  • FOSSASIA OpenTechSummit 2019

    FOSSASIA brings together developers and users of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software). It is an organization developing software applications for social change using a wide-range of technologies. It was established 2009. Projects range from Free and Open Source software, to design, graphics and hardware.

Debian, Ubuntu and Xubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Buster upgrade

    I upgraded my home server from Debian stretch to buster recently, which is something I normally do once we’re frozen: this is a system that was first installed in 1999 and has a lot of complicated stuff on it, and while I try to keep it as cleanly-maintained as I can it still often runs into some interesting problems. Things went largely OK this time round, although there were a few snags of various degrees of severity, some of which weren’t Debian’s fault.

    As ever, etckeeper made it much more comfortable to make non-trivial configuration file changes without fearing that I was going to lose information.

  • Debutsav Mumbai and itsfoss.com changes

    While I and a few members of Debian India has been trying to get a debutsav Mumbai happening, now we have the dates for the event as it was announced today on the mailing list. While there are definitely lot of things that would need to be done in order for a successful Debtusav to happen, at least we have got the dates so other things can get start moving.

  • Anticipating Ubuntu 19.10 on May 2019

    Ubuntu 19.10 codenamed "Eoan" is supposed to be released next October this year. But in May we already can download the ISO image. It continues the previous names of Artful, Bionic, Cosmic, and Disco. And further we can also see the contents of that ISO without even downloading nor running it on our computer by just reading the corresponding manifest file. This short article is for new testers who want to see several information including the desktop, programs versions, and more. This way, it will be interesting for everybody to see and start test Eoan daily build ISO and further to help report issues to the developers.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 577
  • Web and Design team summary – 7 May 2019

    This was a fairly busy two weeks for the Web & design team at Canonical.  Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

  • Switch to Xubuntu 64-bit

    The development of technology makes many electronic devices become sophisticated. One of them is a computer. In 2000 and under, we could still find many computer devices with a CRT (Cathode-ray tube) monitor. And now, the item has become old school items. Same as computer devices that use 32-bit architecture. At this time some software developers only provide various applications for 64-bit systems and have left 32-bit.

    Sometimes, when I look for alternative applications from Windows to Linux, many developers only provide 64-bit. Even though at that time I used 32-bit Ubuntu. And this is one of the difficulties that may be felt by some people who still use computers that are classified as old, like mine.

    Finally, I decided to switch to a 64-bit system. Luckily even though my computer is included in the old production, the laptop processor that I have, supports the installation of 32-bit and 64-bit operating systems. When I write this article, I have used Xubuntu 64-bit. Xubuntu is one of the Linux distributions that I like, and they have also stopped support for 32-bit, starting from Xubuntu 19.04 until next.

Tails 3.13.2 is out

Filed under
Security
Debian

This release is an emergency release to fix a critical security vulnerability in Tor Browser.

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Sparky 4.10

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GNU
Linux
Debian

New live/install images of SparkyLinux 4.10 “Tyche” are available to download.
Sparky 4 is based on Debian stable line of “Stretch”.

Sparky 4.10 offers a fully featured operating system with a lightweight LXDE desktop environment; and minimal images of MinimalGUI (Openbox) and MinimalCLI (text mode) which lets you install the base system with a desktop of your choice with a minimal set of applications, via the Sparky Advanced Installer.

Sparky 4.10 armhf offers a fully featured operating system for single board mini computers RaspberryPi; with the Openbox window manager as default; and a minimal, text mode CLI image to customize it as you like.

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Also: Sergio Durigan Junior: Debian Bug Squashing Party, Toronto version

Debian Leftovers and Development Reports

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Debian
  • Mike Gabriel: My Work on Debian LTS/ELTS (April 2019)

    In April 2019, I have worked on the Debian LTS project for 11.5 hours (of 17.25 hours planned, pulling over 5.75 hours to the next month) and on the Debian ELTS project for another 10 hours (of 10 hours planned) as a paid contributor.

  • Joachim Breitner: Drawing foldl and foldr

    This is taken from the recently published and very nice “foldilocks” tutorial by Ayman Nadeem, but I have seen similar pictures before.

    I always thought that something is not quite right about them, in particular the foldr. I mean, they are correct, and while the foldl one clearly conveys the right intuition, the foldr doesn’t quite: it looks as if the computer would fast forward to the end of the list, and then start processing it. But that does not capture the essence of foldr, which also starts at the beginning of the list, by applying its argument lazily.

  • Romain Perier: My work on Debian (April 2019)
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: Theming, Mutter and Sprint 1

  • App Devs Ask Linux Distros to “Stop Theming Our Apps”
    A group of independent Linux app developers have written an open letter to ask wider GNOME community to ask: “stop theming our apps”. The letter is addressed to the maintainers of Linux distributions who elect to ship custom GTK and icons themes by default in lieu of upstream defaults. By publicising the issues they feel stem from the practice of “theming” it’s hoped that distros and developers might work together to create a “healthier GNOME third party app ecosystem”.
  • A Group of Independent Linux App Developers Has Asked Wider GNOME Community To 'Stop Theming' Its Apps
  • GNOME's Mutter Makes Another Step Towards X11-Less, Starting XWayland On-Demand
    GNOME 3.34 feature development continues at full-speed with a lot of interesting activity this cycle particularly on the Mutter front. On top of the performance/lag/stuttering improvements, today Mutter saw the merging of the "X11 excision" preparation patches. The Mutter patches by longtime GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho around preparing for X11 excision were merged minutes ago.
  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: New Background panel, Calendar search engine, GTK4 shortcut engine (Sprint 1)
    GNOME To Do is full GTK4 these days. Which means it’s both a testbed for new GTK4 features, and also a way to give feedback as an app developer for the GTK team. Unfortunately, it also means To Do is blocked on various areas where GTK4 is lacking. One of these areas is keyboard shortcut. Last year, Benjamin wrote a major revamp for keyboard shortcuts. As part of this cycle, I decided to rebase and finish it; and also make To Do use the new API. Unfortunately, I failed to achieve what I set myself to. Turns out, adding a shortcuts engine to GTK4 is more involving and requires way more context than I had when trying to get it up to speed. I failed to predict that one week would have not been enough to finish it all. However, that does not mean all the efforts were wasted! The rebasing of the shortcuts engine was a non-trivial task successfully completed (see gtk!842), and I also fixed a few bugs while working on it. I also got a working prototype of GNOME To Do with the new APIs, and confirmed that it’s well suited — at least for a simpler application such as To Do. In retrospect, I believe I should have been more realistic (and perhaps slightly pessimistic) about the length and requirements of this task.

Programming: SVE2, Graphical Interface, Guile, Python and More

  • Arm SVE2 Support Aligning For GCC 10, LLVM Clang 9.0
    Given the significant performance benefits to Arm's Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2), they are working on ensuring the open-source Linux compiler toolchains support these new CPU instructions ahead of SoCs shipping that support this big addition. Arm announced Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2) recently as their latest advancement around SIMD programming and increasing data-level parallelism in programs. SVE2 is designed to ultimately deliver better SIMD performance than their long-available Neon extensions and to scale the performance with vector length increases as well as enabling auto-vectorization techniques. More details in this post on SVE2.
  • Intake: Discovering and Exploring Data in a Graphical Interface
    Do you have data that you’d like people to be able to explore on their own? Are you always passing around snippets of code to load specific data files? These are problems that people encounter all the time when working in groups and using the same datasources or when trying to distribute data to the public. Some users are comfortable interacting with data entirely programatically, but often it is helpful to use a GUI (Graphical User Interface) instead. With that in mind we have reimplemented the Intake GUI so that in addition to working in a jupyter notebook, it can be served as a web application next to your data, or at any endpoint.
  • lightening run-time code generation
    The upcoming Guile 3 release will have just-in-time native code generation. Finally, amirite? There's lots that I'd like to share about that and I need to start somewhere, so this article is about one piece of it: Lightening, a library to generate machine code.
  • Python Language Creator: “Male Attitude” Is Hurting The Programming Space
    Guido van Rossum is a famous name in the programming world. He is the creator of the Python programming language which was developed back in 1989. It is only since the last few years when this general-purpose programming language started gaining popularity. The number of Python users has increased significantly and it was not only named as the best programming language by IEEE but also the most asked-about language on Stack Overflow, overthrowing JavaScript — the all-time winner for decades.
  • Avant-IDLE: an experiment

Dear Ubuntu: Please Stop Packaging Epiphany If You Won’t Do It Properly

When users try Epiphany on Ubuntu, they receive a sub-par, broken browser. If you’re not willing to do this right, please just remove Epiphany from your repositories. We’d all be happier this way. You are the most popular distributor of Epiphany by far, and your poor packaging is making the browser look bad. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Episode 19: Democratizing Cybersecurity
    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Alex Gounares of Polyverse Linux about Cybersecurity for everyone.
  • Introducing the Librem Tunnel
    You probably know by now that the Librem Tunnel is part of Librem One, a suite of privacy-protecting, no-tracking apps and services created by our team at Purism, which also includes Librem Mail, Librem Chat and Librem Social. Librem Tunnel offers an encrypted, no-logging, virtual private network tunnel, making sure all your network traffic is secure and your privacy fully protected. This means you can safely and conveniently use any public hotspot and not have to worry about how private your connection really is, using standards-based OpenVPN with any compatible client. You are not the product in Librem Tunnel: you will not be tracked, we do not sell your data, and we don’t advertise.
  • Trump Explains Why He Banned Huawei, And It’s Not Convincing
    The world’s two biggest economies are indulged in a trade war and the toll is being paid by the Chinese company Huawei, which is being erased from existence in the US. The US government has already blacklisted Huawei, causing a big blow to its growing smartphone business across the globe. After the temporary license ends in August, it won’t be able to do any business with US-based companies unless the ban is lifted.
  • Snort Alerts
    It was previously explained on LinuxHint how to install Snort Intrusion Detection System and how to create Snort rules. Snort is an Intrusion Detection System designed to detect and alert on irregular activities within a network. Snort is integrated by sensors delivering information to the server according to rules instructions. In this tutorial Snort alert modes will be explained to instruct Snort to report over incidents in 5 different ways (ignoring the “no alert” mode), fast, full, console, cmg and unsock. If you didn’t read the articles mentioned above and you don’t have previous experience with snort please get started with the tutorial on Snort installation and usage and continue with the article on rules before continuing this lecture. This tutorial assumes you have Snort already running.