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Debian

antiX MX 18.1 Distro Released with Latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch" Updates

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Debian

Based on Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch," antiX MX 18.1 updates the mx-installer, which is based on gazelle-installer, to address bug that lead to crashes during installation of the GRUB bootloader, adds support in mx-repo-manager to lists even more repository mirrors, and improves MX-PackageInstaller and MX-Conky.

Another important area improved in antiX MX 18.1 is the antiX live-USB image, which now features persistence up to 20GB of disk space, as well as much better UEFI boot capabilities, especially when running it on 64-bit UEFI systems. The devs consider creating a "full-featured" antiX live-USB for 32-bit UEFI systems as well.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Debian 9

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Reviews
Debian

Over the past few months I have been working my way through the top Linux distributions and writing a review for each one.

Thus far I have covered Manjaro, Linux Mint, Elementary, MX Linux and Ubuntu. These reviews are based on the top 5 distributions as listed at Distrowatch. Number 6 on that list is Debian which is the distribution I am reviewing here.

The list of distributions at Distrowatch include every distribution that you may or may or not have heard of and it is worth pointing out that not every distribution on the list is suitable for everybody’s needs. For example Kali is very popular with penetration testers and security experts because it comes with a whole range of tools for testing networks and for searching for vulnerabilities. Kali however is not suitable for the average Joe who primarily uses their system for web browsing and casual gaming.

The Everyday Linux User blog is about looking at Linux distributions from the point of view of an average computer user. What this means is that it isn’t specifically for developers, for hackers, for artists, musicians or video bloggers. The reviews are aimed at showing off a standard desktop operating system that by and large should be easy to install, easy to use and should either provide a good variety of applications or the ability to easily install those applications.

With this in mind whilst reviewing certain distributions I will state where that distribution is or isn’t necessarily suitable for the Everyday Linux User.

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Servers: Red Hat, SUSE, and Debian

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Red Hat
Server
Debian
SUSE

Red Hat

  • BlueStore: Improved performance with Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2

    Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.2 is now available! The big news with this release is full support for the BlueStore Ceph backend, offering significantly increased performance for both object and block applications.

  • Which open source backup solution do you use?

    Even though lots of our data exists in the cloud today, you still need to protect your local files with a reliable backup solution. When I needed a new offsite backup solution for my Linux desktop files, I asked my editors and fellow Community Moderators at Opensource.com to share their recommendations. They provided some familiar and some new-to-me options.

  • From The Enterprisers Project: 9 Kubernetes Jobs Facts and Figures
  • 12 ways to get smarter about Kubernetes

    Kubernetes adoption is growing at a rapid clip, yet this is still new technology for most folks. That means that many people in IT, from the C-suite through the most junior positions, are still getting up to speed on the basics and what comes next: What is Kubernetes, what do IT teams use it for, what are the overlapping trends, what are the day-to-day realities, and so forth.

    Fortunately, many accessible resources can help you smooth out the learning curve. Below, we curate some of our favorites. The goal here isn’t to achieve deep technical expertise, but rather to help you beef up your general Kubernetes IQ.

    Doing so can help IT leaders and their teams better understand why Kubernetes has become one of the hottest open source projects around. You’ll also want to delve into its relationship with other significant trends such as containers, cloud-native development, multi-cloud, and hybrid cloud – and yes, dig into the nuts and bolts of the technology itself.

  • CYBG Supports 25x More Customer Logins on iB Digital Services Platform with Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform

SUSE:

  • Anyone Can Benchmark + openSUSE Challenge | Choose Linux 2

    Episode 2 is all about opposites, such as the major differences between benchmarking graphics cards like Radeon VII on Linux and Windows. Then we dive into the Phoronix Test Suite, a robust tool that isn’t just for tech reviewers. Find out why you should be using it too.

    Plus, the distro challenges roll on as Jason decides to do a complete 180, jumping from elementary OS to openSUSE Tumbleweed.

  • Deliver Applications Faster – Here’s How

    Join us for an executive level overview of the path your business can take to reduce application delivery cycle times and increase business agility. We’ll discuss emerging container technologies, cloud native application architectures, DevOps processes, and ways you can use them together to effect the change you need. Discover how SUSE can help you deliver your applications faster!

  • Explore options for SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 Service Pack 4, End-of-Life Mar 31, 2019

    General support for SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 product family, including SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications 11 will be ending on March 31, 2019.

Debian:

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in January 2019

    This month I accepted 363 packages, which is again more than last month. On the other side I rejected 68 uploads, which is almost twice as last month. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 494.

  • Review of Debian System Administrator’s Handbook

    Debian System Administrator’s Handbook is a free-to-download book that covers all the essential part of Debian that a sysadmin might need.

    This has been on my to-do review list for quite some time. The book was started by two French Debian Developers Raphael Hertzog and Roland Mas to increase awareness about the Debian project in France. The book was a huge hit among francophone Linux users. The English translation followed soon after that.

Ubuntu Preloaded by Zotac and Debian Development Reports

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Zotac launches its first five embedded mini-PCs — with Ubuntu

    Zotac unveiled a line of Linux-ready, embedded “ZBox Pro” mini-PCs. The fanless systems include an Apollo Lake based “Pico” ultra-mini-PC plus Braswell and Apollo Lake based “Nano” and Kaby Lake based “QK” models.

    Consumer mini-PC maker Zotac has announced its first line of embedded mini-PCs and the first available with pre-loaded Linux. The Intel-based ZBox Pro series computers are aimed more at light embedded duty such as digital signage than industrial work, and they offer processors and I/O that are very similar to Zotac’s consumer media, desktop replacement, and gaming designs. However, they offer more durable, aluminum cases with extended -20 to 40⁰ to 45⁰ support, depending on the model. They also provide “more controlled tolerances” than Zotac’s consumer mini-PCs, and they offer 5-year longevity support.

  • Debian build helpers: dh dominates

    It's been a while since someone did this. Back in 2009, Joey Hess made a talk at Debconf 9 about debhelper and mentioned in his slides (PDF) that it was used in most Debian packages.

  • Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (January, 2019)

    January was another quiet month for free software. This isn’t to say I wasn’t busy, but merely that there were fewer things going on, with those things being more demanding of my attention. I’m including some more banal activities both to pad out the list, but to also draw some attention to the labor that goes into free software participation.

Safer Way to Run Bleeding Edge Software on Debian and Ubuntu

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Debian
Ubuntu

You may have noticed that some software in your distribution is not the latest available. Most people are not even aware of this because, often, it’s not an issue. It’s only when you need some very recent features when it becomes an issue. Let’s say your favorite video editor had some code changes that improve rendering time by 20%. That may be something you want.

Long story short, most distributions that are considered “stable” or “long term support” will have (at least partially) older software in their repositories. But “rolling distros” have much newer software included, as they constantly pull in updates from upstream developers. Debian Unstable (codenamed Sid) is such a distribution. With some command-line magic, you can run Debain Sid inside your current installation of Debian Stable or Ubuntu.

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Also: Fresh snaps from January 2019

Ubuntu and Debian: ZFS Desktop Support, Weekly Newsletter, LXD For Linux Containers, Ubuntu Core and Raspberry Pi, Debian Buster on the Raspberry Pi 3

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu's Work On New Desktop Installer Continues, Evaluating ZFS Desktop Support

    A few things in Ubuntu's latest weekly development summary caught our attention... As has been going on for months, a new Ubuntu installer "Ubiquity-NG" continues to be worked on, but seemingly tying into that they are looking at ZFS support on the desktop. 

    Public details are light, but it looks like Canonical is evaluating the means of better supporting ZFS on the desktop. ZoL packages are available for all Ubuntu editions right now, but not any nice/easy-to-use desktop installer integration at the moment. 

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 564
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 564
  • LXD For Linux Containers Had A Very Fruitful 2018

    While Canonical often takes heat for their various project "forks", their work on LXD for further innovating atop LXC for Linux containers has really paid off. Over the past few years LXD has really evolved into quite a capable system container manager beast. 

    Stéphane Graber of Canonical talked at FOSDEM in Brussels yesterday about LXD over 2018 and its many accomplishments. The biggest achievement for this project that continues to be led by Canonical is that LXD now ships on all Chromebooks as part of its container support for running Linux applications.

  • Easy IoT with Ubuntu Core and Raspberry Pi

    My current job involves me mostly working in the upper layers of the desktop software stack however I started out working in what was then called embedded engineering but now would probably be know as the Internet of Things (IoT). I worked on a number of projects which normally involved taking some industrial equipment (radio infrastructure, camera control system) and adding a stripped down Linux kernel and an application.

  • Debian buster on the Raspberry Pi 3 (update) [Ed: Updated Monday]
  • Looking for a new Raspberry Pi image maintainer

Debian: 'Secure Boot' and Java

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Debian
  • Help test initial support for Secure Boot

    The Debian Installer team is happy to report that the Buster Alpha 5 release of the installer includes some initial support for UEFI Secure Boot (SB) in Debian's installation media.

    This support is not yet complete, and we would like to request some help! Please read on for more context and instructions to help us get better coverage and support.

  • Debian Installer Buster Alpha 5 Has Initial UEFI Secure Boot Support

    The fifth alpha of the Debian Installer for the upcoming Debian 10.0 "Buster" release is now available for testing. What makes this new release particularly important to test is that it features the initial UEFI Secure Boot support.

    Debian 9 "Stretch" didn't get UEFI Secure Boot support in time while Debian developers have been working to ensure this year's release, Debian 10.0 Buster, will support this security standard found in PC hardware of recent years. The Secure Boot support isn't complete in this Debian Installer Buster Alpha 5 release, but it's getting close and in need of more widespread testing. Debian Buster will default to installing the signed packages on x86_64 hardware.

  • Help the Java Team distribute your project!

    There is a vast array of great free software projects written in Java. All sorts of large systems that we all rely on every day are built upon the Apache Foundation libraries. Large companies like Google and IBM put out standard libraries that so many other projects use. Unfortunately, the standard practice for distributing Java code makes it a lot of work to integrate them into Debian.

    The Debian Java Team's work is generally under-appreciated, so we are getting the word out here. The Java Team has to consistently fight the Java standard practice of bundling all deps into a single JAR. This means there is no shared security updates, each dev has to update every dependency themselves in that model. That works great for large companies with staff devoted to doing that.

Debian Reports: Debconf Video Team Sprint and Jonathan Carter's Work

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Debian
  • Debconf Video Team Sprint – Day 1

    The Debconf Video team has got together for a sprint…

  • Debconf Video Team Sprint – Day 2

    Two things to concentrate on today, getting the stage box rack populated and following conversation with starting to Jonathan last night, to look at Raspberry Pi boot.

    So task 1 Racking up the stage box equipment

    It is a shame that we do not have all of the radio receivers for the stage box yet, never mind; I can leave a 1U space in the case for 2 of the missing receivers and I can fit the the one receiver I have with the log side ear that comes with the kit so that it can still be fitted into the rack… Note to self DO NOT lose the little mounting plate to bind two receivers together – I will need 2 of them, and each receiver comes with just 1…

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities (2019-01)

    I used to think monthly logs are too much effort, but I decided to give it a go and it ended up being easy and very non-intrusive to my workflow.

Want a bit of privacy? Got a USB stick? Welcome to TAILS 3.12

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Security
Debian

The Linux distro for the security-conscious has been updated with a fresh USB installation method.

Hot on the heels of Apple's latest privacy blunder, The Amnesic Incognito Live System (TAILS) has emitted version 3.12.

The big news this time around is the arrival of a USB image alongside the usual ISO. ISOs, handy for burning to a DVD or spinning up a virtual machine, are not so good when it comes to one of TAILS' strengths – running Linux without a trace.

The faff of needing a couple of USB sticks and around three hours of spare time is gone with this release. A single 8GB USB stick is sufficient to handle the 1.2GB download and TAILS reckons that the whole process should take an hour and a half.

A swift download and burn to USB using Etcher and a user is up, running and able to enjoy the discretion afforded by the Debian-based distro and the Tor network.

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Releasing Slax 9.7.0

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Good news, a new and improved version of Slax has been just released as Slax 9.7.0.

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Also: Slax 9.7.0 Released With This Desktop Linux Distribution Down To 255MB

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Red Hat's Wayland Agenda and AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel

  • Hans de Goede: Wayland itches summary
    1. Middle click on title / header bar to lower the Window does not work for native apps. Multiple people have reported this issue to me. A similar issue was fixed for not being able to raise Windows. It should be easy to apply a similar fix for the lowering problem. There are bugs open for this here, here and here. 2. Running graphical apps via sudo or pxexec does not work. There are numerous examples of apps breaking because of this, such as lshw-gui and usbivew. At least for X11 apps this is not that hard to fix. But sofar this has deliberately not been fixed. The reasoning behind this is described in this bug. I agree with the reasoning behind this, but I think it is not pragmatic to immediately disallow all GUI apps to connect when run as root starting today.
  • Hans de Goede: Better support for running games under Wayland (with GNOME3/mutter as compositor)
    First of all I do not want people to get their hopes up about $subject of this blogpost. Improving gaming support is a subjects which holds my personal interest and it is an issue I plan to spend time on trying to improve. But this will take a lot of time (think months for simple things, years for more complex things).
  • AMD Begins Queueing Graphics Driver Changes For The Linux 5.3 Kernel
    Being past the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window, AMD's open-source Linux graphics driver developers have already begun queuing changes anticipated for Linux 5.3 via a work-in-progress tree. Given the short time that this 5.3 WIP tree has been around, there isn't too much exciting about the changes -- yet. But surely over the weeks ahead it will get interesting. Making things particularly interesting is that we are expecting initial Navi support to make it for Linux 5.3... In recent weeks AMD began pushing AMDGPU LLVM compiler back-end changes for GFX10/Navi and we expect the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver enablement to come for Linux 5.3. Linux 5.3 will already be arriving after the rumored release of the first Navi graphics cards so having to wait past 5.3 for mainline support would already be tragic. But given the recent LLVM activity, we expect AMD to push out the Navi kernel driver changes soon. For that likely massive patch-set to be reviewed in time, the Navi patches would need to make their debut within the next few weeks.

today's howtos and programming

Fedora 30 Workstation review - Smarter, faster and buggier

Fedora 30 is definitely one of the more interesting releases of this family in a long-time. It brings significant changes, including solid improvements in the desktop performance and responsiveness. Over the years, Fedora went from no proprietary stuff whatsoever to slowly acknowledging the modern needs of computing, so now it gives you MP3 codecs and you can install graphics drivers and such. Reasonable looks, plus good functionality across the board. However, there were tons of issues, too. Printing to Samba, video screenshot bug, installer cropped-image slides, package management complications, mouse cursor lag, oopses, average battery life, and inadequate usability out of the box. You need to change the defaults to have a desktop that can be used in a quick, efficient way without remembering a dozen nerdy keyboard shortcuts. All in all, I like the freshness. In general, it would seem the Linux desktop is seeing a cautious revival, and Fedora's definitely a happy player. But there are too many rough edges. Well, we got performance tweaks after so many years, and codecs, we might get window buttons and desktop icons one day back, too. Something like 6/10, and definitely worth exploring. I am happy enough to do two more tests. I will run an in-vivo upgrade on the F29 instance on this same box, and then also test the distro on an old Nvidia-powered laptop, which will showcase both the support for proprietary graphics (didn't work the last time) and performance improvements, if they scale for old hardware, too. That's all for now. Read more

Events: Automotive at LF, Linux Clusters Institute, Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan Keynote Speakers and Schedule Announced
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source has announced the speaker line up for Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit. One registration provides access to all content at both events, which will be held July 17-19 at the Toranomon Hills Forum in Tokyo. Open Source Summit Japan (OSSJ) and Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) will bring together top talent from companies on the leading edge of innovation including Toyota Motor Corporation, Uber, Intel, Sony, Google, Microsoft and more. Talks will cover a range of topics, with ALS talks on everything from infrastructure and hardware to compliance and security; and OSSJ sessions on AI, Linux systems, cloud infrastructure, cloud native applications, open networking, edge computing, safety and security and open source best practices.
  • Register Now for the 2019 Introductory Linux Clusters Institute Workshop
    Registration is now open for the 2019 Linux Clusters Institute (LCI) Introductory Workshop,which will be held August 19-23, 2019 at the Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center in New Brunswick, NJ. This workshop will cover the fundamentals of setting up and administering a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster and will be led by leading HPC experts.
  • Additional early bird slots available for LPC 2019
    The Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC) registration web site has been showing “sold out” recently because the cap on early bird registrations was reached. We are happy to report that we have reviewed the registration numbers for this year’s conference and were able to open more early bird registration slots. Beyond that, regular registration will open July 1st. Please note that speakers and microconference runners get free passes to LPC, as do some microconference presenters, so that may be another way to attend the conference. Time is running out for new refereed-track and microconference proposals, so visit the CFP page soon. Topics for accepted microconferences are welcome as well.