Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

Tails 3.9 is out

Filed under
Security
Debian

Tails 3.9 is the biggest update of Tails this year!

Read more

UCS 4.3-2 Published! New: Maintenance Mode for Release Updates …

Filed under
Server
Debian

UCS 4.3-2 now offers a maintenance mode for importing release updates via Univention Management Console (UMC). UMC is the web-based, graphical user interface for the administration of the entire domain. In the past, when a release update was recorded, short-term failures of the UMC could occur, for example, because the updated services were restarted. This new maintenance mode significantly improves the reliability during the import of release updates via UMC. In addition, you can now track the progress of the updates.

Read more

Debian and Ubuntu: LTS Work, LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition), Ubuntu 18.10, ‘Software Center’ Revamp, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Holger Levsen: 20180901-lts-201808
  • My Free Software Activities in July & August 2018 [by Raphaël Hertzog]

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

  • Ubuntu free Linux Mint Project, LMDE 3 ‘Cindy’ Cinnamon, released

    The Linux Mint Project community announced the release of LMDE 3 Cinnamon, codenamed as ‘Cindy’. LMDE( Linux Mint Debian Edition) is a Linux Mint project where the main goal of Linux Mint team is to see how viable their distribution would be and how much work would be necessary if Ubuntu was ever to disappear.

    LMDE aims to be similar to Linux Mint, but without the use of Ubuntu. Instead, LMDE package base is provided by Debian.

    LMDE 3 Cindy includes some bug and security fixes. However, the Debian base package stands unchanged. Mint and desktop components are updated continuously. Once ready, the newly developed features get directly into LMDE. These changes are staged for inclusion in the next upcoming Linux Mint point release, which is not yet disclosed.

  • Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish WON’T Ship With Android Integration

    Earlier this year in May, we reported regarding Canonical’s interest in shipping Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish with inbuilt Android integration. In the latest development, as it turns out, it’s not going to happen.

    As per a report by OMGUbuntu, the Ubuntu developers aren’t satisfied with the current state of GSconnect GNOME Shell extension. For those who don’t know, the developers were planning to bring an out-of-the-box Android integration with the help of this extension only.

  • See Canonical’s Mockups for a Major ‘Software Center’ Revamp

    A major redesign of the Ubuntu Software app is being proposed by Canonical.

    The planned overhaul, hammered out at a design sprint hosted by Canonical back in June, wants to make it easier for you, me, and everyone else to “discover” new apps, more often,

    Canonical design team member Matthew Paul Thomas has produced a series of mockups depicting an idealised “front page ” for the GNOME Software & Ubuntu Software stores, aimed at making the catalog a more exciting and dynamic place

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 543

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 543 for the week of August 27 – September 2, 2018.

Debian's Birthday Party and Technoshamanism

Filed under
Debian
  • [Debian birthday] And lo, we sacrificed to the gods of BBQ once more

    As is becoming something of a tradition by now, Jo and I hosted another OMGWTFBBQ at our place last weekend. People came from far and wide to enjoy themselves. Considering the summer heatwave we've had this year, we were a little unlucky with the weather. But with the power of gazebo technology we kept (mostly!) dry... Smile

    I was too busy cooking and drinking etc. to take any photos myself, so here are some I sto^Wborrowed from my friends!

    We continued to celebrate Debian getting old..

  • Technoshamanism meeting in Axat, France (October 5 to 8)

    We still enjoy temporary autonomous zones, new ways of life, of art / life, we try to think and cooperate towards the goal of food self-sufficiency and interdependence, towards the reforestation of the Earth, and towards the ancestorfuturist fertilization of the imagination. Our main practice is to promote networks of the unconscious to strengthen the desire to form communities as well as proposing alternatives to the “productive” thinking of science and technology.

Debian Stretch Gets Patch for Regression Causing Boot Failures on ARM Systems

Filed under
Debian

In a recent security advisory, Salvatore Bonaccorso writes that the last Linux kernel update released for Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" to mitigate the L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF) security vulnerabilities is causing boot failures for users on the ARM architecture.

Also known as Foreshadow, these security vulnerabilities are similar to the Spectre security vulnerabilities and allow an attacker that has access to an unprivileged process to read the memory from arbitrary addresses that aren't controlled by users, including from the kernel.

Read more

Debian-Based Neptune Linux 5.5 Operating System Released with LibreOffice 6.1

Filed under
OS
Debian

Coming only a month after the Neptune 5.4 release that introduced a new dark theme and updated several components, Neptune 5.5 bumps the kernel version to Linux kernel 4.17.8 and updates the graphics stack to Mesa 18.1.6, AMDGPU DDX 18.0.1, Nouveau DDX 1.0.15, and ATI/Radeon DDX 18.0.1.

"This update represents the current state of Neptune 5 and renews the ISO file so if you install Neptune you don't have to download tons of Updates," writes Leszek Lesner in today's announcement. "In this update we improved hardware support further by providing Linux Kernel 4.17.8 with improved drivers and bugfixes."

Read more

Tails 3.9 Anonymous OS Is Coming September 5 with TrueCrypt & VeraCrypt Support

Filed under
OS
Debian

That's right, we're talking about Tails 3.9, which is currently in development with a Release Candidate ready for public testing as we speak. As we reported a few weeks ago, Tails devs planned on implementing support for opening VeraCrypt encrypted drives in the GNOME desktop environment that's used by default in Tails.

Tails 3.9 promises to be the first release to ship with VeraCrypt support, but it also looks like there will be support for opening TrueCrypt encrypted volumes as well, straight from your GNOME desktop. Moreover, this release will integrate the "Additional Software Packages" feature into the desktop.

Read more

Carl Chenet: FOSS: passive consumerism kills our community

Filed under
OSS
Debian

TL;DR: Don’t be a passive consumer of FOSS. It’s going to kill the FOSS community or change it in bad ways. Contribute in any way described in this article, even really basic ones, but contribute daily or on a very regular basis.

I have been a system engineer for more than 10 years now, almost exclusively working with GNU/Linux systems. I’m also deeply involved in the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) community for a long time and I spend a lot of time on social networks (mostly Twitter and Mastodon these days). And some behaviours always piss me off.

Read more

Debian: TeX Live and Debian Long Term Support (LTS) Reports for July 2018

Filed under
Debian

Deepin OS 15.7 – Enjoy The Better Performance

Filed under
Reviews
Debian

Deepin OS is among the most awesome Operating Systems in the world, period. The Debian-based distro has successfully won the hearts of everybody that I know has used it for over a day and its latest release (in the form of version 15.7) brings so many improvements I could have a field day reviewing them all.

If you are not already familiar with this OS then don’t skip this article.

Deepin OS is an open-source, Debian-based desktop distribution whose aim is to provide users with a beautiful, security-conscious, and user-friendly Operating System. It was initially based on Ubuntu until the release of its current major version, 15 when it switched to model Debian.

As at the time of writing, it sits at #28 on Distrowatch and has a 9/10 rating out of 301 reviews with approx. 325 hits per day.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Tails 3.11 and Tor Transparency (Financials)

The Year 2018 in Open Hardware and MIT's 3D Printer

  • The Year 2018 in Open Hardware
    2018 saw several open hardware projects reach fruition. Where the open hardware movement goes from here, remains to be seen. 2018 was not “The Year of Open Hardware,” any more than it was the fabled “Year of the Linux Desktop.” All the same, 2018 was a year in which open hardware projects started to move from fundraising and project development to product releases. Many of these open products were traditional hardware, but 2018 also saw the release of innovative tech in the form of new and useful gadgets. In the background, open hardware hangs on to traditional niches. These niches occur at the intersection of altruism, hobbyists, academia, and the market, to say nothing of crowdfunding and the relative affordability of 3D printing. A prime example of this intersection is the development of prosthetics. Much of the modern work in open hardware began almost a decade ago with the Yale OpenHand project. At the same time, sites like Hackaday.io offer kits and specifications for hobbyists, while the e-NABLE site has become a place for exchanging ideas for everyone from tinkerers to working professionals in the field. As a result, open hardware technology in the field of prosthetics has grown to rival traditional manufacturers in a handful of years. This niche is a natural one for open hardware not only because of the freely available resources, but for simple economics. Traditionally manufactured prosthetic hands begin at about $30,000, far beyond the budgets of many potential customers. By contrast, an open hardware-based company like the UK based Open Bionics can design a cosmetically-pleasing hand for $200, which is still a large sum in impoverished areas, but far more obtainable. A non-profit called Social Hardware estimates that a need for prosthetic hands in India alone numbers 26,000 and hopes to help meet the demand by offering a development kit on which enthusiasts can learn and later donate their results to those who need them.
  • This MIT Developed 3D Printer Is 10 Times Faster Than Modern 3D Printers
    3D printers have become more and more useful in the mass production of complex products that are cheaper and stronger. However, the only issue with 3D printing is its slow speed. These desktop 3D printers can print only one product at a time and only one thin layer at a making.
  • Accelerating 3-D printing
    Imagine a world in which objects could be fabricated in minutes and customized to the task at hand. An inventor with an idea for a new product could develop a prototype for testing while on a coffee break. A company could mass-produce parts and products, even complex ones, without being tied down to part-specific tooling and machines that can’t be moved. A surgeon could get a bespoke replacement knee for a patient without leaving the operating theater. And a repair person could identify a faulty part and fabricate a new one on site — no need to go to a warehouse to get something out of inventory.

FreeBSD 12.0, FreeNAS 11.2 and DNSSEC enabled in default unbound(8) configuration

Programming: Linux Direct Rendering Manger Subsystem, Python, QtCreator CMake, Rust and More

  • The Linux Direct Rendering Manger Subsystem Poised To Have A Second Maintainer
    For hopefully helping out with code reviews and getting code staged in a timely manner before being upstreamed to the mainline Linux kernel, Daniel Vetter of the Intel Open-Source Technology Center is set to become a co-maintainer.  Daniel Vetter who has been with Intel OTC for a number of years working on their Linux graphics driver has proposed becoming a DRM co-maintainer, "MAINTAINERS: Daniel for drm co-maintainer...lkml and Linus gained a CoC, and it's serious this time. Which means my [number one] reason for declining to officially step up as drm maintainer is gone, and I didn't find any new good excuse."
  • Discovering the pathlib module
    The Python Standard Library is like a gold mine, and the pathlib module is really a gem.
  • QtCreator CMake for Android plugin
    It’s about QtCreator CMake for Android! I know it’s a strange coincidence between this article and The Qt Company’s decision to ditch QBS and use CMake for Qt 6, but I swear I started to work on this project *before* they announced it ! This plugin enables painless experience when you want to create Android apps using Qt, CMake and QtCreator. It’s almost as easy as Android Qmake QtCreator plugin! The user will build, run & debug Qt on Android Apps as easy as it does with Qmake.
  • Testing Your Code with Python's pytest, Part II
  • Top Tips For Aspiring Web Developers
    As we’re a portal geared towards open-source development, we’re naturally going to bang the drum about the benefits of getting involved in open-source projects. There are so many fantastic open-source projects that are still going strong today – WordPress, Android and even Ubuntu/Linux to name but a few. Open source projects will give you direct hands-on experience, allowing you to build your own portfolio of work and network with other like-minded developers too.
  • Announcing Rust 1.31 and Rust 2018
    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.31.0, and "Rust 2018" as well. Rust is a programming language that empowers everyone to build reliable and efficient software.
  • A call for Rust 2019 Roadmap blog posts
    It's almost 2019! As such, the Rust team needs to create a roadmap for Rust's development next year.
  • Processing CloudEvents with Eclipse Vert.x
    Our connected world is full of events that are triggered or received by different software services. One of the big issues is that event publishers tend to describe events differently and in ways that are mostly incompatible with each other. To address this, the Serverless Working Group from the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) recently announced version 0.2 of the CloudEvents specification. The specification aims to describe event data in a common, standardized way. To some degree, a CloudEvent is an abstract envelope with some specified attributes that describe a concrete event and its data.