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Debian

Ubuntu and Debian: ZFS Desktop Support, Weekly Newsletter, LXD For Linux Containers, Ubuntu Core and Raspberry Pi, Debian Buster on the Raspberry Pi 3

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu's Work On New Desktop Installer Continues, Evaluating ZFS Desktop Support

    A few things in Ubuntu's latest weekly development summary caught our attention... As has been going on for months, a new Ubuntu installer "Ubiquity-NG" continues to be worked on, but seemingly tying into that they are looking at ZFS support on the desktop. 

    Public details are light, but it looks like Canonical is evaluating the means of better supporting ZFS on the desktop. ZoL packages are available for all Ubuntu editions right now, but not any nice/easy-to-use desktop installer integration at the moment. 

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 564
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 564
  • LXD For Linux Containers Had A Very Fruitful 2018

    While Canonical often takes heat for their various project "forks", their work on LXD for further innovating atop LXC for Linux containers has really paid off. Over the past few years LXD has really evolved into quite a capable system container manager beast. 

    Stéphane Graber of Canonical talked at FOSDEM in Brussels yesterday about LXD over 2018 and its many accomplishments. The biggest achievement for this project that continues to be led by Canonical is that LXD now ships on all Chromebooks as part of its container support for running Linux applications.

  • Easy IoT with Ubuntu Core and Raspberry Pi

    My current job involves me mostly working in the upper layers of the desktop software stack however I started out working in what was then called embedded engineering but now would probably be know as the Internet of Things (IoT). I worked on a number of projects which normally involved taking some industrial equipment (radio infrastructure, camera control system) and adding a stripped down Linux kernel and an application.

  • Debian buster on the Raspberry Pi 3 (update) [Ed: Updated Monday]
  • Looking for a new Raspberry Pi image maintainer

Debian: 'Secure Boot' and Java

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Debian
  • Help test initial support for Secure Boot

    The Debian Installer team is happy to report that the Buster Alpha 5 release of the installer includes some initial support for UEFI Secure Boot (SB) in Debian's installation media.

    This support is not yet complete, and we would like to request some help! Please read on for more context and instructions to help us get better coverage and support.

  • Debian Installer Buster Alpha 5 Has Initial UEFI Secure Boot Support

    The fifth alpha of the Debian Installer for the upcoming Debian 10.0 "Buster" release is now available for testing. What makes this new release particularly important to test is that it features the initial UEFI Secure Boot support.

    Debian 9 "Stretch" didn't get UEFI Secure Boot support in time while Debian developers have been working to ensure this year's release, Debian 10.0 Buster, will support this security standard found in PC hardware of recent years. The Secure Boot support isn't complete in this Debian Installer Buster Alpha 5 release, but it's getting close and in need of more widespread testing. Debian Buster will default to installing the signed packages on x86_64 hardware.

  • Help the Java Team distribute your project!

    There is a vast array of great free software projects written in Java. All sorts of large systems that we all rely on every day are built upon the Apache Foundation libraries. Large companies like Google and IBM put out standard libraries that so many other projects use. Unfortunately, the standard practice for distributing Java code makes it a lot of work to integrate them into Debian.

    The Debian Java Team's work is generally under-appreciated, so we are getting the word out here. The Java Team has to consistently fight the Java standard practice of bundling all deps into a single JAR. This means there is no shared security updates, each dev has to update every dependency themselves in that model. That works great for large companies with staff devoted to doing that.

Debian Reports: Debconf Video Team Sprint and Jonathan Carter's Work

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Debian
  • Debconf Video Team Sprint – Day 1

    The Debconf Video team has got together for a sprint…

  • Debconf Video Team Sprint – Day 2

    Two things to concentrate on today, getting the stage box rack populated and following conversation with starting to Jonathan last night, to look at Raspberry Pi boot.

    So task 1 Racking up the stage box equipment

    It is a shame that we do not have all of the radio receivers for the stage box yet, never mind; I can leave a 1U space in the case for 2 of the missing receivers and I can fit the the one receiver I have with the log side ear that comes with the kit so that it can still be fitted into the rack… Note to self DO NOT lose the little mounting plate to bind two receivers together – I will need 2 of them, and each receiver comes with just 1…

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities (2019-01)

    I used to think monthly logs are too much effort, but I decided to give it a go and it ended up being easy and very non-intrusive to my workflow.

Want a bit of privacy? Got a USB stick? Welcome to TAILS 3.12

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Security
Debian

The Linux distro for the security-conscious has been updated with a fresh USB installation method.

Hot on the heels of Apple's latest privacy blunder, The Amnesic Incognito Live System (TAILS) has emitted version 3.12.

The big news this time around is the arrival of a USB image alongside the usual ISO. ISOs, handy for burning to a DVD or spinning up a virtual machine, are not so good when it comes to one of TAILS' strengths – running Linux without a trace.

The faff of needing a couple of USB sticks and around three hours of spare time is gone with this release. A single 8GB USB stick is sufficient to handle the 1.2GB download and TAILS reckons that the whole process should take an hour and a half.

A swift download and burn to USB using Etcher and a user is up, running and able to enjoy the discretion afforded by the Debian-based distro and the Tor network.

Read more

Releasing Slax 9.7.0

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Good news, a new and improved version of Slax has been just released as Slax 9.7.0.

Read more

Also: Slax 9.7.0 Released With This Desktop Linux Distribution Down To 255MB

Debian-Based DebEX OS Now Shipping with Linux Kernel 5.0 and Budgie Desktop 10.4

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OS
Debian

DebEX Build 190128 is now available with the Budgie 10.4 desktop environment, and it's the first release of the GNU/Linux distribution to ship with the soon-to-be-released Linux 5.0 kernel. This release is based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, which is currently available as Debian Testing.

The biggest news is the implementation of the Linux 5.0 kernel as Arne Exton took the risk to add a pre-release version into his DebEX operating system. Therefore, DebEX Build 190128 is using Linux kernel 5.0.0 RC3, which means that it shouldn't be installed on production systems.

Read more

Reasons Why I Recommend Using Debian Linux

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Debian

It is a community distribution that does not intend to exploit distribution for commercial purposes, such as Red Hat and Ubuntu.

This point for me is a guarantee to preserve our security and our privacy.

​​Who is interested in this point I invite you to read the social contract of Debian.

Conclusion

We do not have to be formatting our computer every 6 months since the testing and unstable branches follow a model close to the Rolling Release.

If we install Debian Testing or Unstable we will never have to reinstall our operating system because the Debian repositories are updated daily with new Software. In this way, when we update our operating system, we will receive the relevant updates progressively and we will always be using current software versions.

Users who choose to use the stable version will have a 5-year support and in case they want to have current software versions they can use the Debian backports repositories.
Note: The intention of this post is not to say that Debian is superior to the rest of the distributions. I only try to describe the aspects that I like and for which I use Debian.

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New release:

Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch" Live & Installable ISOs Now Available to Download

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Debian

A security vulnerability that could lead to man-in-the-middle attacks allowing remote attackers to install malicious packages on users' computers, which later could be used to execute code with administrative privileged, was discovered in APT, the command-line package manager used by Debian GNU/Linux systems.

The Debian Project was quick to release a patched version of the APT package for their Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" users to address the vulnerability, urging everyone to update their systems as soon as possible. To further limit any unwanted problems, they also respined their installation and live images by releasing Debian GNU/Linux 9.7.

Read more

Also: Updated Debian 9: 9.7 released

MATE desktop in Debian buster becomes remote desktop aware (RDA)

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Debian

The MATE desktop environment in Debian will be the first desktop environment in Debian that has (still basic) support for detecting its graphical context (esp. detecting, if it is run inside a remote session).

With the packages mate-panel 1.20.4-2 and mate-screensaver 1.20.3-3, two new (preview) features entered Debian recently.

Read more

Also: MATE On Debian Becomes Remote Desktop Aware

Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch" Released with Patched APT Package Manager

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Debian

A security vulnerability affects the APT package manager on Debian GNU/Linux and Ubuntu, as well as other derivatives from the two, allowing a remote attacker to install malicious packages users' machines. APT considered the packages as valid, thus allowing the attacker to execute code as root and possibly crash the host.

Both Debian and Ubuntu released patched versions of APT in their supported distributions, but the Debian Project also respined their installation and live images by releasing the Debian GNU/Linux 9.7 "Stretch" point release to avoid any complications in new deployments of their operating system.

Read more

Also:Updated Debian 9: 9.7 released

Debian 9.7 Released To Address APT Security Issue

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12 open source tools for natural language processing

Natural language processing (NLP), the technology that powers all the chatbots, voice assistants, predictive text, and other speech/text applications that permeate our lives, has evolved significantly in the last few years. There are a wide variety of open source NLP tools out there, so I decided to survey the landscape to help you plan your next voice- or text-based application. For this review, I focused on tools that use languages I'm familiar with, even though I'm not familiar with all the tools. (I didn't find a great selection of tools in the languages I'm not familiar with anyway.) That said, I excluded tools in three languages I am familiar with, for various reasons. The most obvious language I didn't include might be R, but most of the libraries I found hadn't been updated in over a year. That doesn't always mean they aren't being maintained well, but I think they should be getting updates more often to compete with other tools in the same space. I also chose languages and tools that are most likely to be used in production scenarios (rather than academia and research), and I have mostly used R as a research and discovery tool. Read more

Devices: Indigo Igloo, Raspberry Pi Projects and Ibase

  • AR-controlled robot could help people with motor disabilities with daily tasks
    Researchers employed the PR2 robot running Ubuntu 14.04 and an open-source Robot Operating System called Indigo Igloo for the study. The team made adjustments to the robot including padding metal grippers and adding “fabric-based tactile sensing” in certain areas.
  • 5 IoT Projects You Can Do Yourself on a Raspberry Pi
    Are you new to the Internet of Things and wonder what IoT devices can do for you? Or do you just have a spare Raspberry Pi hanging around and are wondering what you can do with it? Either way, there are plenty of ways to put that cheap little board to work. Some of these projects are easy while others are much more involved. Some you can tackle in a day while others will take a while. No matter what, you’re bound to at least get some ideas looking at this list.
  • Retail-oriented 21.5-inch panel PCs run on Kaby Lake and Bay Trail
    Ibase’s 21.5-inch “UPC-7210” and “UPC-6210” panel PCs run Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U and Bay Trail CPUs, respectively. Highlights include 64GB SSDs, mini-PCIe, mSATA, and IP65 protection.

NexDock 2 Turns Your Android Phone or Raspberry Pi into a Laptop

Ever wished your Android smartphone or Raspberry Pi was a laptop? Well, with the NexDock 2 project, now live on Kickstarter, it can be! Both the name and the conceit should be familiar to long-time gadget fans. The original NexDock was a 14.1-inch laptop shell with no computer inside. It successfully crowdfunded back in 2016. The OG device made its way in to the hands of thousands of backers. While competent enough, some of-the-time reviews were tepid about the dock’s build quality. After a brief stint fawning over Intel’s innovative (now scrapped) Compute Cards, the team behind the portable device is back with an updated, refined and hugely improved model. Read more

Graphics: Libinput 1.13 RC2, NVIDIA and AMD

  • libinput 1.12.902
    The second RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    This is the last RC, expect the final within the next few days unless
    someone finds a particulaly egregious bug.
    
    One user-visible change: multitap (doubletap or more) now resets the timer
    on release as well. This should improve tripletap detection as well as any
    tripletap-and-drag and similar gestures.
    
    valgrind is no longer a required dependency to build with tests. It was only
    used in a specific test run anyway (meson test --setup=valgrind) and not
    part of the regular build.
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    
    Benjamin Poirier (1):
          evdev: Rename button up and down states to mirror each other
    
    Feldwor (1):
          Set TouchPad Pressure Range for Toshiba L855
    
    Paolo Giangrandi (1):
          touchpad: multitap state transitions use the same timing used for taps
    
    Peter Hutterer (3):
          tools: flake8 fixes, typo fixes and missing exception handling
          meson.build: make valgrind optional
          libinput 1.12.902
  • Libinput 1.13 RC2 Better Detects Triple Taps
    Peter Hutterer of Red Hat announced the release of libinput 1.13 Release Candidate 2 on Thursday as the newest test release for this input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland Linux systems. Libinput 1.13 will be released in the days ahead as the latest six month update to this input library. But with the time that has passed, it's not all that exciting of a release as the Logitech high resolution scrolling support as well as Dell Totem input device support for the company's Canvas display was delayed to the next release cycle. But libinput 1.13 is bringing touch arbitration improvements for tablets, various new quirks, and other fixes and usability enhancements.
  • Open-Source NVIDIA PhysX 4.1 Released
    Software releases are aplenty for GDC week and NVIDIA's latest release is their newest post-4.0 PhysX SDK. NVIDIA released the open-source PhysX 4.0 SDK just before Christmas as part of the company re-approaching open-source for this widely used physics library. Now the latest available is PhysX 4.1 and the open-source code drop is out in tandem.
  • AMD have launched an update to their open source Radeon GPU Analyzer, better Vulkan support
    AMD are showing off a little here, with an update to the Radeon GPU Analyzer open source project and it sounds great.