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Debian

HP Linux Imaging & Printing Drivers Now Support Linux Mint 19.1 and Debian 9.7

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Linux
Debian

More than two months in development, the HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.19.3 software and drivers are here implement support for a bunch of new HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro All-in-One 9010, HP OfficeJet Pro All-in-One 9020, HP OfficeJet All-in-One 9010, HP PageWide XL 4100 and 4600 printers, HP PageWide XL 4100 and 4600PS MFP, as well as HP Color LaserJet Managed MFP E77422a, E77422dv, E77422dn, and E77428dn.

Additionally, it now supports the HP LaserJet MFP E72425a, E72425dv, E72425dn, and E72430dn, HP LaserJet Managed MFP E62655dn and E62665hs, HP LaserJet Managed Flow MFP E62665h, E62675z, and E62665z, HP LaserJet Managed E60155dn, E60165dn, and E60175dn, HP Color LaserJet Managed E65150dn and E65160dn, as well as HP Color LaserJet Managed MFP E67650dh and HP Color LaserJet Managed Flow MFP E67660z printers.

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Debian, Event in Kosovo and ApacheCon

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OSS
Debian

Ubuntu/Debian: Snapcraft Release and LTS Work by Mike Gabriel and Sylvain Beucler

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Snapcraft 3.3

    snapcraft 3.1 is now available on the stable channel of the Snap Store. This is a new minor release building on top of the foundations laid out from the snapcraft 3.3 release.

    If you are already on the stable channel for snapcraft then all you need to do is wait for the snap to be refreshed.

  • Mike Gabriel: My Work on Debian LTS/ELTS (March 2019)

    In March 2019, I have worked on the Debian LTS project for 14 hours (of 10 hours planned plus 4 hours pulled over from February) and on the Debian ELTS project for another 2 hours (of originally planned 6 hours) as a paid contributor.

  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS - March 2019

    In February I had requested to join the Debian LTS project, which extends the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

Sparky 5.7.1

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Debian

New live/install iso images of SparkyLinux 5.7.1 “Nibiru” are available to download.

This is a minor update of live images of Sparky 5 based on Debian testing “Buster”.

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Debian: Freexian, Reproducible Builds, Append-only Backup and Debian India (DebUtsav)

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Debian
  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, March 2019

    I was assigned 20 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 16.5 hours from February. I worked 22.5 hours and so will carry over 14 hours.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #205

    On our mailing list this week, Vagrant Cascadian posted a request for suggestions for Reproducible Builds-related ideas that students from Portland State University could work on. In addition, Holger Levsen made an announcement that registration for a MiniDebConf in Hamburg during June 2019 is now open and will likely involve a number of people involved in Reproducible Builds.

  • Append-only backups with borg to another VPS or dedicated server

    Prerequisites to follow this guide is to use Debian Stretch (9) or Debian Buster (10) and have two servers available, one main server from which the backups are taken, and another backup server where the backup archives will be stored. These two servers should be in separate locations for optimum protection.

    This guide will start with the configuration on the backup server in the first section. In the second section, we will configure the main server and then perform a backup, a test restore and show how to manually prune of old backup archives.

  • DebUtsav Delhi

    Debutsav-Delhi is the third edition of its kind. Initially Mozilla Delhi backed the Debutsav-delhi when they pitched the idea but later they withdrew for some reason and just became a supporting member. I must say Debian India events are happening frequent now. Some years ago in India Debian hang around with other FLOSS events. Now its DebUtsav giving chance to other FLOSS people to meet around Debian.

    As the usual way of DebUtsav, this one also was two day event with separate track for Debian related talks and for general FLOSS talk. I gave a talk about Debian LTS project. On first day evening some speakers and organizers gathered for dinner.

Debian elections: field reduced to four after one withdrawal

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Debian

One of the five candidates in the running for the post of leader of the Debian/GNU Linux project has withdrawn from the race, leaving four to contest for the post.
Simon Richter, an embedded systems expert from Germany, said he was pulling out of the race for personal reasons which he did not specify.

"As you may have noticed, life happened to me shortly after sending that mail [the email announcing he was throwing his hat in the ring]," he wrote.

"I'm definitely not in a position to make a serious bid anymore, so I'd like to withdraw. I still have opinions, but I guess I'll just blog about them at some point."

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Also: Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities March 2019

Debian and Sparky Reports for March

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GNU
Linux
Debian
  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in March 2019

    My activities as the current Debian Project Leader are covered in my Bits from the DPL (March 2019) email to the debian-devel-announce mailing list. Attentive followers of the on-going Debian Project Leader Elections will have noted that I am not running for a consecutive third term, so this was therefore my last such update, at least for the time being…

  • Joerg Jaspert: Miscellaneous, DPL election, Archive changes, Crazyness

    As some may have noticed, I nominated myself for this years DPL election. Crazy times, indeed. Got four other candidates, one has withdrawn in the meantime, so we will have a ballot with 5 options (don’t forget famous NOTA).

    My company helpfully agreed on quite a bunch of time I can take, should I really get elected, which I think will also help the other areas I am active in.

    I won’t bore you with repeating what I said in my platform or on the Debian Vote List, if you are interested in the DPL election business, feel free to read through it all. It is certainly an interesting campaigning period until now.

    Whoever will win in the end, I am sure it will be a good DPL.

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities (2019-03)
  • Sparky news 2019/03

    The 3rd monthly report of 2019 of the Sparky project:
    • Sparky Tube received a few improvements
    • Advanced Installed has a new option which lets you choose autologin without password (suggested by Elton)
    • Sparky 5.7 released (LXQt, MinimalGUI/Openbox, MinimalCLI)
    • Sparky 5.7 Special Editions released (GameOver, Multimedia & Rescue)
    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.0.5 & 4.20.17 (EOL) & 5.1-rc2
    • Added to repos: mkusb, qCalculator, qCamera, Sway, tbsm, mako, bemenu
    • Updated sddm-theme-sparky: replaced existing theme by a new one, which doesn’t need plasma as a dependency any more; added another sddm theme to a new ‘sddm-theme1-sparky’ package

The Debian Project mourns the loss of Innocent de Marchi

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Debian
Obits

The Debian Project recently learned that it has lost a member of its community. Innocent de Marchi passed a few months ago.

Innocent was a math teacher and a free software developer. One of his passions was tangram puzzles, which led him to write a tangram-like game that he later packaged and maintained in Debian. Soon his contributions expanded to other areas, and he also worked as a tireless translator into Catalan.

The Debian Project honors his good work and strong dedication to Debian and Free Software. Innocent's contributions will not be forgotten, and the high standards of his work will continue to serve as an inspiration to others.

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Debian: Screencasts, Free Software Work and Montreal's Debian & Stuff

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Debian
  • Series of screencasts related to DevOps and Debian packaging

    The screencasts are straightforward without any fuzz, just how this and that has to be done on a workbench. More stuff is coming up if there are some subscriptions.

  • Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (March, 2019)

    March was overrun with work, work, work. Planning a conference takes a lot out of you and consumes a lot of time, even when you’re getting paid to do it.

  • Montreal's Debian & Stuff - April 2019

    We had another Debian & Stuff in Montreal last weekend. Some people from the local FOSS community wanted to gather and watch the LibrePlanet 2019 livestream and we thought merging it with a D&S would be a good idea.

    People came and went, but all in all around 10 people showed up and we had tons of fun. I ended up hacking some more on my Tor Puppet module and played around with packaging the Tomu's bootloader in Debian.

    Some of the talks were really great. The videos aren't online yet, but if you eventually want to watch some of them, Tarek Loubani's opening keynote on FOSS and medical devices in Gaza was amazing (and hard to watch1). I also really enjoyed Shauna Gordon-McKeon's talk on governing the software commons.

The 4 best Debian Linux derivatives to check out

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Debian

The Debian Linux operating system is one of the oldest Linux distributions in history. It’s highly influential and used as a base in some of the most famous Linux operating systems.

Due to how influential Debian is, many derivatives have come on the scene over the years. These spin-offs of Debian borrow the core philosophy of the project but add in a twist, such as a focus on security, ease of use, etc. There are a whole lot of Debian Linux spinoffs out there. It is because of this that, we’ve decided to list off the best ones. So, here are the four best Debian derivatives to check out!

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Rob Szumski’s Keynote and Abby Kearns Interview at CloudNativeCon & KubeCon

GNOME: Theming, Mutter and Sprint 1

  • App Devs Ask Linux Distros to “Stop Theming Our Apps”
    A group of independent Linux app developers have written an open letter to ask wider GNOME community to ask: “stop theming our apps”. The letter is addressed to the maintainers of Linux distributions who elect to ship custom GTK and icons themes by default in lieu of upstream defaults. By publicising the issues they feel stem from the practice of “theming” it’s hoped that distros and developers might work together to create a “healthier GNOME third party app ecosystem”.
  • A Group of Independent Linux App Developers Has Asked Wider GNOME Community To 'Stop Theming' Its Apps
  • GNOME's Mutter Makes Another Step Towards X11-Less, Starting XWayland On-Demand
    GNOME 3.34 feature development continues at full-speed with a lot of interesting activity this cycle particularly on the Mutter front. On top of the performance/lag/stuttering improvements, today Mutter saw the merging of the "X11 excision" preparation patches. The Mutter patches by longtime GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho around preparing for X11 excision were merged minutes ago.
  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: New Background panel, Calendar search engine, GTK4 shortcut engine (Sprint 1)
    GNOME To Do is full GTK4 these days. Which means it’s both a testbed for new GTK4 features, and also a way to give feedback as an app developer for the GTK team. Unfortunately, it also means To Do is blocked on various areas where GTK4 is lacking. One of these areas is keyboard shortcut. Last year, Benjamin wrote a major revamp for keyboard shortcuts. As part of this cycle, I decided to rebase and finish it; and also make To Do use the new API. Unfortunately, I failed to achieve what I set myself to. Turns out, adding a shortcuts engine to GTK4 is more involving and requires way more context than I had when trying to get it up to speed. I failed to predict that one week would have not been enough to finish it all. However, that does not mean all the efforts were wasted! The rebasing of the shortcuts engine was a non-trivial task successfully completed (see gtk!842), and I also fixed a few bugs while working on it. I also got a working prototype of GNOME To Do with the new APIs, and confirmed that it’s well suited — at least for a simpler application such as To Do. In retrospect, I believe I should have been more realistic (and perhaps slightly pessimistic) about the length and requirements of this task.

Programming: SVE2, Graphical Interface, Guile, Python and More

  • Arm SVE2 Support Aligning For GCC 10, LLVM Clang 9.0
    Given the significant performance benefits to Arm's Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2), they are working on ensuring the open-source Linux compiler toolchains support these new CPU instructions ahead of SoCs shipping that support this big addition. Arm announced Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2) recently as their latest advancement around SIMD programming and increasing data-level parallelism in programs. SVE2 is designed to ultimately deliver better SIMD performance than their long-available Neon extensions and to scale the performance with vector length increases as well as enabling auto-vectorization techniques. More details in this post on SVE2.
  • Intake: Discovering and Exploring Data in a Graphical Interface
    Do you have data that you’d like people to be able to explore on their own? Are you always passing around snippets of code to load specific data files? These are problems that people encounter all the time when working in groups and using the same datasources or when trying to distribute data to the public. Some users are comfortable interacting with data entirely programatically, but often it is helpful to use a GUI (Graphical User Interface) instead. With that in mind we have reimplemented the Intake GUI so that in addition to working in a jupyter notebook, it can be served as a web application next to your data, or at any endpoint.
  • lightening run-time code generation
    The upcoming Guile 3 release will have just-in-time native code generation. Finally, amirite? There's lots that I'd like to share about that and I need to start somewhere, so this article is about one piece of it: Lightening, a library to generate machine code.
  • Python Language Creator: “Male Attitude” Is Hurting The Programming Space
    Guido van Rossum is a famous name in the programming world. He is the creator of the Python programming language which was developed back in 1989. It is only since the last few years when this general-purpose programming language started gaining popularity. The number of Python users has increased significantly and it was not only named as the best programming language by IEEE but also the most asked-about language on Stack Overflow, overthrowing JavaScript — the all-time winner for decades.
  • Avant-IDLE: an experiment

Dear Ubuntu: Please Stop Packaging Epiphany If You Won’t Do It Properly

When users try Epiphany on Ubuntu, they receive a sub-par, broken browser. If you’re not willing to do this right, please just remove Epiphany from your repositories. We’d all be happier this way. You are the most popular distributor of Epiphany by far, and your poor packaging is making the browser look bad. Read more