Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

BunsenLabs Linux Lithium Release Hits Stable After Two Years, Based on Debian Buster

Filed under
Debian

After more than two years in development, BunsenLabs Linux Lithium release has finally hit the stable channel today for this OpenBox-based and lightweight Debian GNU/Linux derivative, a continuation of the acclaimed CrunchBang Linux.

The BunsenLabs Team is proud to announce today the official release of BunsenLabs Lithium, a new major release based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” operating system series.

As expected, BunsenLabs Linux Lithium is packed with lots of goodies, including the ability to install the distribution on newer computers that use Secure Boot, a new look and feel featuring a brand-new dark theme with custom-colored Papirus icons by default, and more modularity for user to fully customize the distro to their needs.

For example, users can now replace the default Openbox window manager with another desktop environment and keep many of the settings, such as menu item, key bindings, and autostarted apps. Also, the BunsenLabs session now uses jgmenu by default and can coexist with a default Openbox or Xfce sessions.

[...]

The BunsenLabs Linux Lithium release is available for download right now from the official website as a 64-bit live ISO and a minimal, CD-sized 32-bit non-PAE version, which can be extended to full-size by installing the bunsen-meta-all or bunsen-meta-lite metapackages.

Read more

Direct: [STABLE RELEASE] BunsenLabs Lithium Official ISOs

Also: [Debian-Based SparkyLinux] July 2020 donation report

Debian Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities July 2020

    This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in July 2020

    This was my 17th month of contributing to Debian. I became a DM in late March last year and a DD last Christmas! \o/

    Well, this month I didn’t do a lot of Debian stuff, like I usually do, however, I did a lot of things related to Debian (indirectly via GSoC)!

  • DebConf3

    This tshirt is 17 years old and from DebConf3. I should probably wash it at 60 celcius for once...

    DebConf3 was my first DebConf and took place in Oslo, Norway, in 2003. I was very happy to be invited, like any Debian contributor at that time, and that Debian would provide food and accomodation for everyone. Accomodation was sleeping on the floor in some classrooms of an empty school and I remember having tasted grasshoppers provided by a friendly Gunnar Wolf there, standing in line on the first day with the SSH maintainer (OMG!1 (and it wasn't Colin back then!)) and meeting the one Debian person I had actually worked with before: Thomas Lange or MrFAI. In Oslo I also was exposed to Skolelinux / Debian Edu for the first time, saw a certain presentation from the FTP masters and also noticed some people recording the talks, though as I learned later these videos were never released to the public. And there was this fiveteen year old called Toresbe, who powered on the PDP's which were double his age. And then actually made use of them. And and and.

  • Sparky news 2020/07

    The 7th monthly report of 2020 of the Sparky project:

    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.7.11 & 5.8-rc7
    • added new desktop: NsCDE
    • added to repo: Shutter-Encoder, Lite Editor, Sparky APTus AppCenter
    • Sparky 5.12 Nibiru of the stable line released
    • riot-desktop package changed its name to element-desktop

Updated Debian 10: 10.5 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the fifth update of its stable distribution Debian 10 (codename "buster"). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

This point release also addresses Debian Security Advisory: DSA-4735-1 grub2 -- security update which covers multiple CVE issues regarding the GRUB2 UEFI SecureBoot 'BootHole' vulnerability.

Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 10 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old "buster" media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

Those who frequently install updates from security.debian.org won't have to update many packages, and most such updates are included in the point release.

New installation images will be available soon at the regular locations.

Read more

Also: Debian GNU/Linux 10.5 “Buster” Released with BootHole Patches, 62 Security Updates

Debian 10.5 Released To Address The GRUB2 BootHole Vulnerability, Other Security Fixes

Debian 10.5 Buster point release 20200801 - all of the fixes

Debian 10.5 media testing process started 202008011145 - post 1 of several.

Debian 10.5 media testing - continuing quite happily - post 2 of several

Debian: Ben Hutchings, Chris Lamb, and Jonathan Carter

Filed under
Debian

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, July 2020

    I was assigned 20 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative, but only worked 5 hours this month and returned the remainder to the pool.

    Now that Debian 9 'stretch' has entered LTS, the stretch-backports suite will be closed and no longer updated. However, some stretch users rely on the newer kernel version provided there. I prepared to add Linux 4.19 to the stretch-security suite, alongside the standard package of Linux 4.9. I also prepared to update the firmware-nonfree package so that firmware needed by drivers in Linux 4.19 will also be available in stretch's non-free section. Both these updates will be based on the packages in stretch-backports, but needed some changes to avoid conflicts or regressions for users that continue using Linux 4.9 or older non-Debian kernel versions. I will upload these after the Debian 10 'buster' point release.

  •        

  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in July 2020

    As part of being on the board of directors of the Open Source Initiative and Software in the Public Interest I attended their respective monthly meetings and participated in various licensing and other discussions occurring on the internet, as well as the usual internal discussions regarding logistics and policy etc. This month, it was SPI's Annual General Meeting and the OSI has been running a number of remote strategy sessions for the board.

  •        

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities for 2020-07

    Here are my uploads for the month of July, which is just a part of my free software activities, I’ll try to catch up on the rest in upcoming posts. I haven’t indulged in online conferences much over the last few months, but this month I attended the virtual editions of Guadec 2020 and HOPE 2020. HOPE isn’t something I knew about before and I enjoyed it a lot, you can find their videos on archive.org.

Why has Debian been gripped by vendettas?

Filed under
Debian

Debian Community News and the Uncensored Debian Planet site (follow the RSS feed if you want all sides of the story) have cast a new light on uncomfortable truths about the way free software is produced.

As people dig deeper, they are surprised to find that evidence of cult phenomena is indisputable while accusations against victims lack any evidence whatsoever.

Nonetheless, running an elaborate cult surely takes time and effort. Why would anybody bother to do this?

Credibility of Debian's name

Debian, thanks to the the Debian Social Contract, long history and technical reliability, has built up a reputation for technical competence.

When somebody associated with Debian points out that Google's privacy policy is no more than a modern-day re-write of The Emperor's New Clothes, their concerns are often amplified and widely noticed.

Companies like Google resent this, so they exert influence in various ways to discredit those individuals who speak the truth.

We see exactly the same phenomena in the United States right now where President Trump has been trying to undermine his country's leading expert on pandemics, Dr Anthony Fauci.

Read more

Debian: Former DPL Chris Lamb, Current DPL Jonathan Carter and Steve Kemp

Filed under
Debian

           

  • Chris Lamb: Pop culture matters

    Many people labour under the assumption that pop culture is trivial and useless while only 'high' art can grant us genuine and eternal knowledge about the world. Given that we have a finite time on this planet, we are all permitted to enjoy pop culture up to a certain point, but we should always minimise our interaction with it, and consume more moral and intellectual instruction wherever possible.

    Or so the theory goes. What these people do not realise is that pop culture can often provide more information about the world, humanity in general and — what is even more important — ourselves.

    This is not quite the debate around whether high art is artistically better, simply that pop culture can be equally informative. Jeremy Bentham argued in the 1820s that "prejudice apart, the game of push-pin is of equal value with the arts and sciences of music and poetry", that it didn't matter where our pleasures come from. (John Stuart Mill, Bentham's intellectual rival, disagreed.) This fundamental question of philosophical utilitarianism will not be resolved here.

    [...]

    In summary, we can simultaneously say that pop culture is not worthy of our time relative to other pursuits while consuming however much of it we want, but deliberately dismissing pop culture doesn't mean that a lot of other people are not interacting with it and is therefore undeserving of any inquiry. And if that doesn't convince you, just like the once-unavoidable millennial pink, simply sticking our collective heads in the sand will not mean that wider societal-level ugliness is going to disappear anytime soon.

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities for 2020-06

    Hmm, this is the latest I’ve posted my monthly updates yet (nearly by a month!). June was both crazy on the incoming side, and at the same time I just wasn’t that productive (at least since then I caught up a lot). In theory, lockdown means that I spend less time in traffic, in shops or with friends and have more time to do stuff, in practice I go to bed later and later and waste more time watching tv shows and playing mobile games. A cycle that I have at least broken free from since June.

  • Steve Kemp: I'm a bit of a git (hacker?)

    Sometimes I enjoy reading the source code to projects I like, use, or am about to install for the first time. This was something I used to do on a very regular basis, looking for security issues to report. Nowadays I don't have so much free time, but I still like to inspect the source code to new applications I install, and every now and again I'll find the time to look at the source to random projects.

    Reading code is good. Reading code is educational.

    One application I've looked at multiple times is redis, which is a great example of clean and well-written code. That said when reading the redis codebase I couldn't help noticing that there were a reasonably large number of typos/spelling mistakes in the comments...

Tails 4.9, the Amnesic Incognito Live System, Released with Linux Kernel 5.7

Filed under
Security
Debian

Tails 4.9 is a monthly update that’s here to replace last month’s Tails 4.8 release for those who want to install the popular amnesic incognito live system on new computers.

Therefore, Tails 4.9 is just an updated installation media containing various up-to-date components. The most important updated component in this release being the Linux kernel, which has been updated to version 5.7.6.

Tails 4.8 was using Linux kernel 5.6, which is no longer supported, so the inclusion of the latest Linux 5.7 kernel series in Tails is great news for those who want to run the Debian-based distribution on newer hardware.

Read more

Craig Small: 25 Years of Free Software

Filed under
GNU
Debian

So you have written something you think others might like, what software license will you use to distribute it? In 1995 it wasn’t that clear. This was the era of strange boutique licenses including ones where it was ok to run the program as a hamradio operator but not a CB radio operator (or at least they tried to work it that way).

A friend of mine and the author of the Linux HAM HOWTO amongst other documents, Terry Dawson, suggested I use GPL or another Free Software license. He explained what this Free Software thing was and said that if you want your program to be the most useful then something like GPL will do it. So I released axdigi under the GPL license and most of my programs since then have used the same license. Something like MIT or BSD licenses would have been fine too, I was just not going to use something closed or hand-crafted.

That was a while ago, I’ve written or maintained many programs since then. I also became a Debian maintainer (23 years so far) and adopted both procps and psmisc which I still maintain as both the Debian developer and upstream to this day.

Read more

Events: DebianDay, GUADEC 2020 and OpenSUSE + LibreOffice

Filed under
GNOME
Debian
SUSE
  • Let's celebrate DebianDay 2020 around the world

    We encourage our community to celebrate around the world the 27th Debian anniversary with organized [DebianDay][1] events. This year due to the COVID-19 pandemic we cannot organize in-person events, so we ask instead that contributors, developers, teams, groups, maintainers, and users promote The Debian Project and Debian activities online on August 16th (and/or 15th).

    Communities can organize a full schedule of online activities throughout the day. These activities can include talks, workshops, active participation with contributions such as translations assistance or editing, debates, BoFs, and all of this in your local language using tools such as [Jitsi][2] for capturing audio and video from presenters for later streaming to YouTube.

    If you are not aware of any local community organizing a full event or you don't want to join one, you can solo design your own activity using [OBS][3] and stream it to YouTube. You can watch an OBS tutorial [here][4].

    Don't forget to record your activity as it will be a nice idea to upload it to [Peertube][5] later.

  • GUADEC 2020 Kicks Off Today as GNOME’s First Virtual Conference

    The GUADEC 2020 (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) event kicks off today until July 28th as GNOME’s first online conference in the coronavirus era.

    The time has come for the summer Linux conferences to open their doors to virtual visitors, and GUDEC 2020 is the first major Linux conference to switch to an online format. The event was supposed to take place in Zacatecas, Mexico, but as you can imagine, everyone is adapting every day to respond to the needs created by the COVID-19 crisis, which affects us all.

    GUADEC 2020 is the place where GNOME users and developers from all over the world gather together to share knowledge and discuss upcoming features of the next major release of the GNOME desktop environment, which is used by numerous Linux-based operating systems, including Ubuntu, Debian, openSUSE, Fedora, and many others.

  • openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference Extends Call for Papers

    Organizers of the openSUSE + LibreOffice Virtual Conference are extending the Call for Papers to August 4.

    Participants can submit talks for the live conference past the original deadline of July 21 for the next two weeks.

    The conference is scheduled to take place online from Oct. 15. - 17.

    The length of the talks that can be submitted are either a 15-minute short talk, a 30-minute normal talk and/or a 60-minute work group session. Organizers believe shortening the talks will keep attendees engaged for the duration of the online conference.

Debian: Unusual Bug, Sparky and Many New Developers

Filed under
Debian
  • Screen ghosts

    This is happening on two different laptops, an HP EliteBook x360 G1, and a Lenovo ThinkPad X240, one that I've been using since 3 years, one that I've been using since a week, and whose only thing in common is a 1920x1080 IPS screen and an Intel GPU.

    I have no idea where to start debugging this. Please reach out to me at enrico@debian.org if any of this makes sense to you.

  • Lite Editor

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: Lite Editor

    What is Lite Editor?

    Lite is a lightweight text editor written mostly in Lua — it aims to provide something practical, pretty, small and fast, implemented as simply as possible; easy to modify and extend, or to use without doing either.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (May and June 2020)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

    Richard Laager (rlaager)
    Thiago Andrade Marques (andrade)
    Vincent Prat (vivi)
    Michael Robin Crusoe (crusoe)
    Jordan Justen (jljusten)
    Anuradha Weeraman (anuradha)
    Bernelle Verster (indiebio)
    Gabriel F. T. Gomes (gabriel)
    Kurt Kremitzki (kkremitzki)
    Nicolas Mora (babelouest)
    Birger Schacht (birger)
    Sudip Mukherjee (sudip)
    The following contributors were added as Debian

    Maintainers in the last two months:

    Marco Trevisan
    Dennis Braun
    Stephane Neveu
    Seunghun Han
    Alexander Johan Georg Kjäll
    Friedrich Beckmann
    Diego M. Rodriguez
    Nilesh Patra
    Hiroshi Yokota

    Congratulations!

Syndicate content