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Debian

DebConf20 Debian Conference Kicks Off Today for Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye”

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Debian

This year, the Debian Project celebrates two major events, the project’s 27th anniversary and 12 years since the launch of the first DebConf Debian developer conference.

An annual gathering, DebConf is the most important event for Debian developers and users, who gather together to share their knowledge and plan on the features of the next major Debian GNU/Linux release.

Initially scheduled to take place in Haifa, Israel, from August 23rd to 29th, the DebConf20 conference is for Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye,” which is heavily developed under the Debian Testing umbrella since July 2019.

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Stepping down as Qt 6 maintainers

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Debian

After quite some time maintaining Qt in Debian both Dmitry Shachnev and I decided to not maintain Qt 6 when it's published (expected in December 2020, see https://wiki.qt.io/Qt_6.0_Release). We will do our best to keep the Qt 5 codebase up and running.

We **love** Qt, but it's a huge codebase and requires time and build power, both things that we are currently lacking, so we decided it's time for us to step down and pass the torch. And a new major version seems the right point to do that.

We will be happy to review and/or sponsor other people's work or even occasionally do uploads, but we can't promise to do it regularly.

Some things we think potential Qt 6 maintainers should be familiar with are, of course, C++ packaging (specially symbols files) and CMake, as Qt 6 will be built with it.

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Also: Debian's Qt Maintainers Stepping Down Ahead Of Qt 6.0

Sparky 2020.08

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GNU
Linux
Debian

The August snapshot of Sparky 2020.08 of the (semi-)rolling line is out.
It is based on the Debian testing “Bullseye”.

Changes:
• packages updated from Debian testing repos as of August 14, 2020
• Linux kernel 5.7.10 (5.8.1 & 5.9-rc1 in Sparky unstable repos)
• added Memory Test and Hardware Detection to the live config
• installed qt5ct + added qt5ct config to non Qt based desktops: Openbox, MATE & Xfce
• GCC 9 removed; the default compiler is GCC 10 now
• LXQt 0.14.1
• MATE 1.24.1
• Xfce 4.14
• Firefox 79.0
• Thunderbird 68.11.0
• LibreOffice 7.0.0-rc2 (7.0.1~rc1 in Debian testing repos now)
• VLC 3.0.11
• Calamares 3.2.24
• small improvements

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Also: SparkyLinux 2020.08 Continues the Debian Bullseye Rolling Releases with LibreOffice 7.0, GCC 10

DebConf20 talk recorded

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Debian

OK, one step back. Why are we doing this? Because our hardworking friends of the DebConf20 video team recommended so. In order to minimize connecitvity issues from the variety of speakers throughout the world, we were requested to pre-record the exposition part of our talks, send them to the video team (deadline: today 2020-08-16, in case you still owe yours!), and make sure to be present at the end of the talk for the Q&A session. Of course, for a 45 minute talk, I prepared a 30 minute presentation, saving time for said Q&A session.

Anyway, I used the excellent OBS studiolive video mixing/editing program (of course, Debian packages are available. This allowed me to set up several predefined views (combinations and layouts of the presentation, webcam, and maybe some other sources) and professionally and elegantly switch between them on the fly.

I am still a newbie with OBS, but I surely see it becoming a part of my day to day streaming. Of course, my setup still was obvious (me looking right every now and then to see or control OBS, as I work on a dual-monitor setup…)

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Debian turns 27!

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Debian

Today is Debian's 27th anniversary. We recently wrote about some ideas to celebrate the DebianDay, you can join the party or organise something yourselves

Today is also an opportunity for you to start or resume your contributions to Debian. For example, you can scratch your creative itch and suggest a wallpaper to be part of the artwork for the next release, have a look at the DebConf20 schedule and register to participate online (August 23rd to 29th, 2020), or put a Debian live image in a DVD or USB and give it to some person near you, who still didn't discover Debian.

Our favorite operating system is the result of all the work we do together. Thanks to everybody who has contributed in these 27 years, and happy birthday Debian!

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Also: Debian GNU/Linux Turns 27 Years Old

Meet the first South African elected to lead Debian Linux

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Interviews
Debian

Earlier this year, the developers of Debian elected Jonathan Carter, a South African based in Cape Town, as the Debian Project Lead.

Debian is a Linux distribution that is an important component in the free software and open-source ecosystems.

Aside from being used as an operating system on servers and desktop computers, Debian is used as the foundation of several other popular Linux distributions, including Ubuntu which was founded by Mark Shuttleworth.

Debian was also a pioneer in providing users with central software repositories, releasing its Advanced Packaging Tool in 1999.

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Debian Janitor: 8,200 landed changes landed so far

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Debian

The Debian Janitor is an automated system that commits fixes for (minor) issues in Debian packages that can be fixed by software. It gradually started proposing merges in early December. The first set of changes sent out ran lintian-brush on sid packages maintained in Git. This post is part of a series about the progress of the Janitor.

The bot has been submitting merge requests for about seven months now. The rollout has happened gradually across the Debian archive, and the bot is now enabled for all packages maintained on Salsa , GitLab , GitHub and Launchpad.

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Debian vs Ubuntu in 2020- The Ultimate Showdown

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Debian
Ubuntu

As a computer software distribution package, Ubuntu and Debian are utilized in two ways...

Desktop Operating System
Server

Although they are similar in many ways, they have their differences. Ubuntu is based on the testing branch of Debian and often, Debian involves too many manual works and so it is not recommended for beginners. While Ubuntu is easy to use for beginners, it is not as stable as Debian in its built. Let us have a comparison between Debian vs Ubuntu.

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Cosmo Communicator Review: the dual boot pocket PC phone

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KDE
Linux
Reviews
Debian

Around the turn of the century, smartphones came in many clever and innovative shapes and sizes. For about 10 years, we lost that innovation to rectangular touch screen slabs, but now some of that innovation is coming back. The Cosmo Communicator is a good example. It’s an Android smartphone with a real physical keyboard, a clam-shell hinge to open it up, and an external screen. It even allows you to partition the storage area and install full Linux for a dual boot experience.

The Cosmo Communicator is 171.4mm long, 79.3mm wide, and 17.3mm thick. It’s not a small device. The weight is 326g, so it’s not light either. It’s got a 4220mAh battery with fast charging, 5.99″ FHD 2160×1080 pixel main display, 1.91″ external OLED touch display, 24Mp external camera with LED flash, and 5Mp front-facing video call camera. It supports all of the GSM, CDMA, and 4G LTE radios and is also available in a Verizon version or Japan version for those different frequencies. You’ve got dual nano-SIM card slots and eSIM support as well. It comes with Android 9.0 installed, but now with recent updates, we can also install a special version of Debian Linux. Sailfish might work too.

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Debian GNU/Linux 11 (Bullseye) Artwork Contest Is Now Open for Entries

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GNU
Linux
Debian

This is the moment for aspiring artists and designers who want to display their work in front of millions of Debian users to submit their best artwork for the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 11 (Bullseye) operating system series, due for release in mid-2021.

Submissions are opened until November 1st, 2020, but your artwork needs to meet the following specifications. For example, you will have to create a wiki page for your artwork proposal at DebianArt/Themes, write down a few words about your idea, use an image format that can be later modified using free and open source software, and add a license that lets the Debian Project distribute your artwork within Debian GNU/Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: NVIDIA, Intel, AMD and Zink

     
  • NVIDIA GeForce Now quietly starts working on Linux as the Avengers come to play

    If you use or have been following NVIDIA GeForce Now, the cloud gaming platform that delivers PC titles you already own from sources such as Steam and Epic Games to a multitude of devices, the latest development seems to have emerged silently. Spotted by the team at GamingonLinux, users of Linux can now, it seems, access GeForce Now in either Chromium of Google Chrome. Indeed, previously this tactic involved fudging user agents to make GeForce Now believe you were on a Chromebook, following the launch of the web client for Google's laptops. And it works just fine, I logged in and played some games with no issues on Ubuntu in both browsers. And just to double check, Firefox still shows an incompatible device error.

  • Intel Compute Runtime 20.37.17906 Brings Rocket Lake Support

    Intel's software team has released a new version of their Compute Runtime that provides OpenCL and oneAPI Level Zero capabilities for their graphics hardware on Linux.

  • AMDGPU TMZ + HDCP Should Allow Widevine DRM To Behave Nicely With AMD Linux Systems

    Coming together this year for the mainline Linux kernel was the AMDGPU Trusted Memory Zone (TMZ) capability for encrypted video memory support with Radeon GPUs. This topic was talked about at this week's XDC2020 conference. AMDGPU TMZ prevents unauthorized applications from accessing the encrypted/trusted memory of an application. TMZ protects both reads and writes while leveraging an AES cipher. But while discrete Radeon GPUs can also support TMZ, for now the AMD Linux developers have just been focused on the capability for their APU platforms.

  • Zink OpenGL-On-Vulkan Seeing Some 50~100% FPS Gains

    After working on getting the Zink OpenGL-over-Vulkan driver up to OpenGL 4.6 with still pending patches, former Samsung OSG engineer Mike Blumenkrantz has been making remarkable progress on the performance aspect as well. This generic Mesa OpenGL implementation that works atop Vulkan drivers is about to see much better performance. Blumenkrantz recently commented the performance was turning out better than expected but that was for micro-benchmarks. But now with more optimizations he is achieving even better results.

Sculpt OS release 20.08

  • Sculpt OS release 20.08

    The new version of Sculpt OS is based on the latest Genode release 20.08. In particular, it incorporates the redesigned GUI stack to the benefit of quicker boot times, improved interactive responsiveness, and better pixel output quality. It also removes the last traces of the noux runtime. Fortunately, these massive under-the-hood changes do not disrupt the user-visible surface of Sculpt. Most users will feel right at home. Upon closer inspection, there are couple of new features to appreciate. The CPU-affinity of each component can now be restricted interactively by the user, components can be easily restarted via a click on a button, font-size changes have an immediate effect now, and the VESA driver (used when running Sculpt in a virtual machine) can dynamically change the screen resolution.

  • Sculpt OS 20.08 Released With Redesigned GUI Stack

    Building off the recent Genode OS 20.08 operating system framework release is now Sculpt OS 20.08 as the open-source project's general purpose operating system attempt. Sculpt OS 20.08 pulls in the notable Genode 20.08 changes like the redesigned GUI stack with better responsiveness and other benefits. It also includes the ability to run the Falk web browser as the first Chromium-based browser on Genode/Sculpt. Sculpt OS is Genode's effort around creating a general purpose OS but for right now is still largely limited to developers, hobbyists, and those wishing to tinker around with new operating systems.

today's howtos

Python Programming

  • Python 3.8.5 : Linked List - part 001.
  • Doug Hellmann: sphinxcontrib.datatemplates 0.7.0

    sphinxcontrib.datatemplates is an extension for Sphinx to render parts of reStructuredText pages from data files in formats like JSON, YAML, XML, and CSV.

  • Python : 10 Ways to Filter Pandas DataFrame

    In this article, we will cover various methods to filter pandas dataframe in Python. Data Filtering is one of the most frequent data manipulation operation. It is similar to WHERE clause in SQL or you must have used filter in MS Excel for selecting specific rows based on some conditions. In terms of speed, python has an efficient way to perform filtering and aggregation. It has an excellent package called pandas for data wrangling tasks. Pandas has been built on top of numpy package which was written in C language which is a low level language. Hence data manipulation using pandas package is fast and smart way to handle big sized datasets.

  • Top GUI Frameworks that is every Python Developer's Favorite

    Python is one of the most popular and widely known programming languages that is a favorite in the developer community. Its advanced libraries and file extensions enable developers to build state-of-the-art tools for real-world problems, or simply design a GUI (Graphic User Interface). GUI plays an essential role in the computer world as it makes human-machine interaction easier. Python offers a diverse range of options for GUI frameworks. Some of these frameworks are more preferred by the developers to build both .apk and .exe applications. Moreover, its GUI toolkits include TK, GTK, QT, and wxWidgets, which come with more features than other platform-specific kits. Though the Python wiki on GUI programming lists on 30 cross-platform frameworks, we have selected our top 4 picks. They are: Kivy: It an open-source Python library for the rapid development of applications that makes use of innovative user interfaces, such as multi-touch apps. This liberal MIT-licensed Kivy is based on OpenGL ES 2 and includes native multi-touch for each platform. It is an event-driven framework based around the main loop, making it very suitable for game development. It supports multiple platforms, namely, Windows, MacOSX, Linux, Android-iOS, and Raspberry Pi. Unlike QtCreator, Kivy doesn’t have a visual layout program, but it uses its own design language to help you associate UI layout with code objects.