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Debian

Ubuntu vs Linux Mint Distro Comparison

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu

With the constantly changing system and desktop requirements, our needs for a suitable operating system change too. For people belonging to the programming and software development field, an operating system or a distro matching their work capacity matters a lot. If you are a Linux user and looking for a new Linux distribution for your system, then the two best options you could consider – are Ubuntu, and Linux Mint. Keeping in mind both of the above distros have a number of editions to download from, so we will compare the latest ones for your ease.

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Source Code Adventure Part 2: Debian, Source DVDs, and Professional Repositories

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Debian

As a continuation to Part 1, this article will present you information regarding source code availability of Debian GNU/Linux operating system. Fortunately, Debian provides us Source Code DVDs in ISO image format. This means when we distribute Debian to people we can easily distribute the corresponding source code as well, quickly and conveniently, as many free software licenses like GNU GPL within Debian require it. Think about it: if Debian does not provide so, how do we distribute the source accompanying the binary ISO? It requires gigantic effort per person, as we will need --among other options-- to manually scrap Debian repository to provide corresponding source code. That's why I said source DVDs are convenient. More fortunately, Debian also provides us so many places online to get source code either in individual or collective forms and facilitate us to search among them intelligently. Everything is really professional in my opinion. I could not find any other distro that gives same level of source code availability services like Debian. Finally, like before, I hope this helps everybody to get source code of GNU/Linux and learn more about it. Okay, let's go!

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PureOS Rolls On as Stable

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GNU
Linux
Debian

A rolling release receives periodic updates in a “rolling” fashion–they just keep rolling in. This is good, as you get the latest cutting edge changes to applications and system libraries. But unfortunately there is a side effect to rolling releases: they are bad for stability, because the changes they bring are often not yet widely used, or tested, in real world situations. This issue is inherent to any fast moving body of code, and PureOS is no different; we attempt to solve it by putting the user at the center of our design choices. With this in mind, we polled our forum and worked internally to devise a pragmatic solution that follows best practices, while continuing to provide options for users.

Our solution is straightforward; we’re making our PureOS release a stable release, and creating a new rolling release. In addition to this stable release, we’re adding two complementary suites–amber-security and amber-updates–which work together to bring a rock solid release. We will also build and release a rolling release just like the one our users are used to, meant for those who are willing to use, and test, the latest software from upstream. Both releases will receive security updates, of course, but the rolling release will lack real-world testing, by design.

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Tails 3.16 is out

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Debian

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Debian: Latest Work by Jonathan Carter, Mike Gabriel, Thorsten Alteholz, and Russ Allbery

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Debian
  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities (2019-08)

    Ah, spring time at last. The last month I caught up a bit with my Debian packaging work after the Buster freeze, release and subsequent DebConf. Still a bit to catch up on (mostly kpmcore and partitionmanager that’s waiting on new kdelibs and a few bugs). Other than that I made two new videos, and I’m busy with renovations at home this week so my home office is packed up and in the garage. I’m hoping that it will be done towards the end of next week, until then I’ll have little screen time for anything that’s not work work.

  • Mike Gabriel: My Work on Debian LTS/ELTS (August 2019)

    In August 2019, I have worked on the Debian LTS project for 24 hours (of 24.75 hours planned) and on the Debian ELTS project for another 2 hours (of 12 hours planned) as a paid contributor.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in August 2019

    This month the numbers went up again and I accepted 389 packages and rejected 43. The overall number of packages that got accepted was 460.

  • rra-c-util 8.0

    This is a roll-up of a lot of changes to my utility package for C (and increasingly for Perl). It's been more than a year since the last release, so it's long-overdue.

    Most of the changes in this release are to the Perl test libraries and accompanying tests. Test::RRA now must be imported before Test::More so that it can handle the absence of Test::More (such as on Red Hat systems with perl but not perl-core installed). The is_file_contents function in Test::RRA now handles Windows and other systems without a diff program. And there are more minor improvements to the various tests written in Perl.

Sparky 2019.09

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

There are new live/install media of Sparky 2019.09 “Po Tolo” available to download. This is the 2nd snapshot of the (semi-)rolling line, which is based on the testing branch of Debian “Bullseye”.

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Debian Leftovers

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Debian
  • C TAP Harness 4.5

    Peter Paris requested that C TAP Harness support being built as C++ code. I've not been a big fan of doing this with pure C code since I find some of the requirements of C++ mildly irritating, but Peter's initial patch also fixed one type error in a malloc uncovered because of one of C++'s rules requiring the return of malloc be cast. It turned out to be a mostly harmless error since the code was allocating a larger struct than it needed to, but it's still evidence that there's some potential here for catching bugs.

    That said, adding an explicit cast to every malloc isn't likely to catch bugs. That's just having to repeat oneself in every allocation, and you're nearly as likely to repeat yourself incorrectly.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities August 2019
  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - August 2019

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

  • Sparky news 2019/08

    The 8th monthly report of 2019 of the Sparky project:

    • Sparky 2019.08 (semi-)rolling based on Debian testing “Bullseye” released
    • Chours translate Wiki pages to Russian, so I do that to Polish as well; let me know if you would like to translate Sparky Wiki to your language
    • Sparky 2019.08 Special Editions released
    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.2.11 & 5.3-rc6
    • Nemomen started translating Sparky tools to Hungarian
    • added to repos: FreeOffice office suite

HP Linux Imaging & Printing Drivers Now Support Linux Mint 19.2 and Debian 10

Filed under
Linux
Debian

The HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.19.8 software is now available with support for several new HP printers and scanners, among which we can mention HP DesignJet T1530 Postscript, HP DesignJet T2530 Postscript, HP DesignJet T930 Postscript, HP DesignJet T1600 Postscript Printer, and HP DesignJet T1600dr Postscript Printer.

Additionally, the HP DesignJet T2600 Postscript MFP, HP LaserJet Pro MFP M329dn, HP LaserJet Pro MFP M329dw, HP LaserJet Pro M305d, HP LaserJet Pro M304a, HP LaserJet Pro M305dn, and HP LaserJet Pro M305dw printers are supported as well in the HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.19.8 release, which also adds support for new GNU/Linux distributions.

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Debian and Ubuntu/Canonical Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Molly de Blanc: Free software activities (July 2019)

    Debian AH rebranded to the Debian Community Team (CT) after our sprint back in June. We had meetings, both following up on things that happened at the meeting and covering typical business. We created a draft of a new team mission statement, which was premiered, so to speak, at DebConf19.

  • Mike Gabriel: Debian goes libjpeg-turbo 2.0.x [RFH]

    I recently uploaded libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp1 to Debian experimental. This has been the first upload of the 2.0.x release series of libjpeg-turbo.

    After 3 further upload iterations (~exp4 that is), the package now builds on nearly all (except 3) architectures supported by Debian.

    @all: Please Test

    For those architectures that libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp* is already available in Debian experimental, please start testing your applications on Debian testing/unstable systems with libjpeg-turbo 2.0.2-1~exp* installed from experimental. If you observe any peculiarities, please file bugs against src:libjpeg-turbo on Debian BTS. Thanks!

    Please note: the major 2.x release series does not introduce an SOVERSION bump, so applications don't have to be rebuilt against the newer libjpeg-turbo. Simply drop-in-replace installed libjpeg62-turbo bin:pkg by the version from Debian experimental.

  • Kubernetes 1.16 beta now available, with support from Canonical

    Canonical announces full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.16, starting with the beta release, with support covering the following installation mechanisms – kubeadm, Charmed Kubernetes, and MicroK8s.

    The beta release of Kubernetes offers users an opportunity to test some of the upcoming features and to validate containerised workloads on the latest Kubernetes technology. It also offers the user community a chance to give early feedback on the next release, ensuring new features work as intended, and the existing features you rely upon haven’t regressed.

    For quick, secure, and reliable Kubernetes installations in a single step, the MicroK8s beta channel will be updated with Kubernetes 1.16 beta. In addition to supporting the beta, the MicroK8s community has recently added one line installs of Helm and Cilium. With MicroK8s 1.16 beta you can develop and deploy Kubernetes 1.16 on any Linux desktop, server or VM across 42 Linux distros. Mac and Windows are supported with Multipass.

  • MicroK8s Version 1.16.0 Beta Released!

    We’re excited to announce the release of MicroK8s 1.16 beta! MicroK8s is a lightweight and reliable Kubernetes cluster delivered as a single snap package – it can be installed on any Linux distribution which supports snaps or Windows and Mac using Multipass. MicroK8s is small and simple to install and is a great way to stand up a cluster quickly for development and testing. Try it on your laptop!

  • A guide to developing Android apps on Ubuntu

    Android is the most popular mobile operating system and is continuing to grow its market share. IDC expects that Android will have 85.5% of the market by 2022, demonstrating that app development on Android will continue to be an in-demand skill.

    For developers looking to build Android apps, Ubuntu is the ideal platform in conjunction with Android Studio – the official Android development environment. Ubuntu features a wide variety of software development tools including numerous programming language compilers, integrated development environments (IDEs) and toolchains to enable developers to target multiple hardware platforms.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 593
  • Snaps help Xibo rekindle its relationship with Linux

    Sometimes, relationships just don’t work out. At first, it seemed that Xibo and Linux were made for each other. Xibo had a popular open source digital signage and player system, while Linux brought a community of enthusiastic users. Dan Garner of Xibo remembers why they broke up in 2015: “Releasing our player on Linux was too heavy on development resources, we were a small team, and it was difficult to make deployment stable”.

    So, Linux releases were shelved, much to the disappointment of users. Xibo’s software remained available as open source and as binaries. However, Linux users had to do the heavy lifting to install it and make it work. Hardcore fans often built their Xibo systems directly from the source code, creating a patchwork of different generations of the software in a universe outside Xibo’s mainstream activities.

  • Connect to Wi-Fi From Terminal on Ubuntu 18.04/19.04 with WPA Supplicant

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how to connect to Wi-Fi network from command line on Ubuntu 18.04/19.04 server and desktop using wpa_supplicant. In a modern home wireless network, communications are protected with WPA-PSK (pre-shared key) as opposed to WPA-Enterprise, which is designed for enterprise networks. WPA-PSK is also known as WPA-Personal. wpa_supplicant is an implementation of the WPA supplicant component. A supplicant in wireless LAN is a client software installed on end-user’s computer that needs to be authenticated in order to join a network.

Kali Linux Team has Renamed their Meta-packages to More Meaningful

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Security
Debian

Kali Linux team has renamed their meta-packages to more meaningful to understand it in a better way.

This implementation will optimize Kali, reduce ISO size, and organize meta-packages in a better way.

Some of you may already know about it, however, i will give you an overview about meta-package before discuss further on this topic.

What’s Meta-package?

Meta-packages are specialized packages, they do not contain any files usually found in packages.

Meta-package is a way to collect and group related software packages, they simply depend on other packages to be installed.

It allows entire sets of software to be installed by selecting only the appropriate meta-package.

Say for example, Each Linux desktop environments comes with a wide range of applications, it can be installed by running a single command because they were already grouped together.

This will reduce download requirements, i mean to say, this will obtain all the Gnome packages in one download.

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Android Leftovers

Android Leftovers

How App Stores Are Addressing Fragmentation in the Linux Ecosystem

According to DistroWatch, 273 Linux distributions are currently active, with another 56 dormant and 521 discontinued. While some of these have shared underpinnings, it still makes for an extremely varied landscape for companies and developers. It means developers must create multiple versions of their applications to be able to provide their software to all Linux users or just address a fraction of the market. Also, developers require multiple versions of build tools, which inevitably results in significant resource overhead. Desktop application distribution is complex across all operating systems in general; in Linux, this is further compounded by such fragmentation and inter-dependencies both in the packaging and distribution of software. For example, Fedora uses the RPM packaging format, while Debian uses the .deb format. Moreover, packages built for one version of a Linux distribution are often incompatible with other versions of the same distribution and need to be built for each version separately. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (ansible, faad2, linux-4.9, and thunderbird), Fedora (jbig2dec, libextractor, sphinx, and thunderbird), Mageia (expat, kconfig, mediawiki, nodejs, openldap, poppler, thunderbird, webkit2, and wireguard), openSUSE (buildah, ghostscript, go1.12, libmirage, python-urllib3, rdesktop, and skopeo), SUSE (python-Django), and Ubuntu (exim4, ibus, and Wireshark).

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 161 - Human nature and ad powered open source

    Josh and Kurt start out discussing human nature and how it affects how we view security. A lot of things that look easy are actually really hard. We also talk about the npm library Standard showing command line ads. Are ads part of the future of open source?

  • Skidmap malware drops LKMs on Linux machines to enable cryptojacking, backdoor access

    Researchers have discovered a sophisticated cryptomining program that uses loadable kernel modules (LKMs) to help infiltrate Linux machines, and hides its malicious activity by displaying fake network traffic stats. Dubbed Skidmap, the malware can also grant attackers backdoor access to affected systems by setting up a secret master password that offers access to any user account in the system, according to Trend Micro threat analysts Augusto Remillano II and Jakub Urbanec in a company blog post today. “Skidmap uses fairly advanced methods to ensure that it and its components remain undetected. For instance, its use of LKM rootkits – given their capability to overwrite or modify parts of the kernel – makes it harder to clean compared to other malware,” the blog post states. “In addition, Skidmap has multiple ways to access affected machines, which allow it to reinfect systems that have been restored or cleaned up.”

  • Skidmap Linux Malware Uses Rootkit Capabilities to Hide Cryptocurrency-Mining Payload

    Cryptocurrency-mining malware is still a prevalent threat, as illustrated by our detections of this threat in the first half of 2019. Cybercriminals, too, increasingly explored new platforms and ways to further cash in on their malware — from mobile devices and Unix and Unix-like systems to servers and cloud environments. They also constantly hone their malware’s resilience against detection. Some, for instance, bundle their malware with a watchdog component that ensures that the illicit cryptocurrency mining activities persist in the infected machine, while others, affecting Linux-based systems, utilize an LD_PRELOAD-based userland rootkit to make their components undetectable by system monitoring tools.