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Debian

Debian-Based Mobian Linux Now Supports the PineTab Linux Tablet

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Debian

The Debian-based Mobian Linux distribution for mobile devices is now available for PINE64’s PineTab Linux tablet in addition to the PinePhone Linux phone. A couple of months ago, I told you about the Mobian Project, a new GNU/Linux distribution that promised to bring the many benefits of the Debian GNU/Linux operating system to mobile devices.

To achieve that, Mobian Linux leverages the GNOME-based Phosh user interface developed by Purism for their Librem 5 phone, but for other devices, such as PINE64’s very popular PinePhone Linux phone. Until today, Mobian only supported the PinePhone, but the developers just announced on Twitter that they’ve started building their mobile oriented distribution for PINE64’s PineTab Linux tablet too.

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Mobian OS For PinePhone Now Available For Linux Tablet ‘PineTab’

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OS
Linux
Debian

A few months ago, we reported about Mobian Linux, an open-source project that aims to bring Debian GNU/Linux to mobile devices. Initially, Mobian was only available for Linux-based PinePhone. But as expected, Mobian OS has finally been ported to another PINE64 device, PineTab.

Yes, the Mobian team officially announced on Twitter that along with PinePhone it has started to support and build images for Linux-based tablet PineTab too.

The team also said that Mobian OS would support even more devices in the coming months. As of now, images of Mobian Linux are only available for PINE64’s smartphone and tablet device i.e., PinePhone and PineTab.

If you have a PineTab tablet, you can download the latest prebuilt Mobian image for PineTab and install it following the official guide.

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[Tails] Call for testing: 4.11~rc1

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Tails 4.11, scheduled for September 22, will be the first version of Tails to include Tor Browser 10.0 and to support persistent settings on the Welcome Screen!

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A morality cabal of Debian users tried to knife Torvalds

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Linux
Debian

A morality cabal of Debian users had a go at censoring IT’s Mr Sweary Linus Torvalds in 2014 according to a leak of documents from Debian-private.

The documents show a group of Linux developers who were so shocked that Torvalds swore at a conference they were attempting to use the Debian code-of-conduct to get him ostracised from the Linux mother church.

What appears to have got their knickers in a twist was that: “Linus described the Free Software Foundation as `bigots.’"

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Jonathan Carter: DebConf 20 Online

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Debian

My first one was DebConf7. Initially I mostly started watching the videos because I wanted to learn more about packaging. I had just figured out how to create binary packages by hand, and have read through the new maintainers guide, but a lot of it was still a mystery. By the end of DebConf7 my grasp of source packages was still a bit thin, but other than that, I ended up learning a lot more about Debian during DebConf7 than I had hoped for, and over the years, the quality of online participation for each DebConf has varied a lot.

I think having a completely online DebConf, where everyone was remote, helped raise awareness about how important it is to make the remote experience work well, and I hope that it will make people who run sessions at physical events in the future consider those who are following remotely a bit more.

During some BoF sessions, it was clear that some teams haven’t talked to each other face to face in a while, and I heard at least 3 teams who said “This was nice, we should do more regular video calls!”. Our usual communication methods of e-mail lists and IRC serve us quite well, for the most part, but sometimes having an actual conversation with the whole team present at the same time can do wonders for dealing with many kind of issues that is just always hard to deal with in text based mediums.

There were three main languages used in this DebConf. We’ve had more than one language at a DebConf before, but as far as I know it’s the first time that we had multiple talks over 3 languages (English, Malayalam and Spanish).

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Also: Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in August 2020

Debian: DebConf 2020 and Latest Development Reports

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Debian
  • Elana Hashman: Three talks at DebConf 2020

    This year has been a really unusual one for in-person events like conferences. I had already planned to take this year off from travel for the most part, attending just a handful of domestic conferences. But the pandemic has thrown those plans into chaos; I do not plan to attend large-scale in-person events until July 2021 at the earliest, per my employer's guidance.

    I've been really sad to have turned down multiple speaking invitations this year. To try to set expectations, I added a note to my Talks page that indicates I will not be writing any new talks for 2020, but am happy to join panels or reprise old talks.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in August 2020

    Here’s my (eleventh) monthly update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world.

  • Mike Gabriel: My Work on Debian LTS (August 2020)

    In August 2020, I have worked on the Debian LTS project for 16 hours (of 8 hours planned, plus another 8 hours that I carried over from July).

The Problems Debian Is Facing In 2020

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Debian

The virtual DebConf20 concluded last week as the annual main conference for the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Recently elected Debian Project Leader Jonathan Carter gave his talk at the event as an overview of where the project is at today as well as some of the problems they are facing today.

Debian's finances are sitting at around a healthy $896,065 USD. COVID-19 has helped their finances a bit in regards to less travel/conference expenses. Carter also noted as part of their fund, Debian is in the process of acquiring two new Lenovo servers they were able to obtain discounted to help in their efforts.

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Sparky 2020.09

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Debian

The September snapshot of Sparky 2020.09 of the (semi-)rolling line is out. It is based on the Debian testing “Bullseye”.

This release provides package updates and fixed an issue of the Sparky Advanced Installer, which generated broken fstab. There is no problem if you have installed Sparky 2020.08 using Calamares (called Sparky Installer).

Changes:
• packages updated from Debian testing repos as of August 31, 2020
• Linux kernel 5.7.17 (5.8.5 & 5.9-rc3 in Sparky unstable repos)
• Firefox 80
• LibreOffice 7.0.1-rc1
• fixed the Advanced Installer issue; thanks to lami07

System re-installation is not required, simply keep Sparky up to date.

The Special Edition iso images have been already updated too.

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Debian: BBB vs Jitsi, Extended Long Term Support (ELTS) and More

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Debian
  • Russell Coker: BBB vs Jitsi

    I previously wrote about how I installed the Jitsi video-conferencing system on Debian [1]. We used that for a few unofficial meetings of LUV to test it out. Then we installed Big Blue Button (BBB) [2]. The main benefit of Jitsi over BBB is that it supports live streaming to YouTube. The benefits of BBB are a better text chat system and a “whiteboard” that allows conference participants to draw shared diagrams. So if you have the ability to run both systems then it’s best to use Jitsi when you have so many viewers that a YouTube live stream is needed and to use BBB in all other situations.

    One problem is with the ability to run both systems. Jitsi isn’t too hard to install if you are installing it on a VM that is not used for anything else. BBB is a major pain no matter what you do. The latest version of BBB is 2.2 which was released in March 2020 and requires Ubuntu 16.04 (which was released in 2016 and has “standard support” until April next year) and doesn’t support Ubuntu 18.04 (released in 2018 and has “standard support” until 2023). The install script doesn’t check for correct apt repositories and breaks badly with no explanation if you don’t have Ubuntu Multiverse enabled.

  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - August 2020

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

    In August, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 21.75h for LTS (out of my 30 max; all done) and 14.25h for ELTS (out of my 20 max; all done).

    We had a Birds of a Feather videoconf session at DebConf20, sadly with varying quality for participants (from very good to unusable), where we shared the first results of the LTS survey.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities August 2020

    This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

  • Daniel Lange & Debian, aggression and hypocrisy in focus

    This blog follows up on the earlier report about Daniel Lange, who was accused of aggression but accepted into Debian anyway at almost the same time Jacob Appelbaum was expelled.

    We quote the following two emails from the debian-private (leaked) gossip network, little comment is needed to see the hypocrisy at work inside Debian.

Securedrop Worktstation and how can you help

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Server
Security
Debian

The second half of the event was a live demo of the new SecureDrop Workstation project.

SecureDrop is an open source whistleblower submission system that media organizations and NGOs can install to securely accept documents from anonymous sources. It was originally created by the late Aaron Swartz and is now managed by Freedom of the Press Foundation. SecureDrop is available in 20 languages.

The current SecureDrop is dependent heavily on air-gapped Tails systems. This means increased security but also means a lot of time in accessing the submissions by the journalists. SecureDrop Workstation is the next generation system coming up to help in reducing this and also provide much smoother user experience without giving up the security.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla/Firefox/Tor Browser

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.5a1

    Tor Browser 10.1a1 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • Karl Dubost: Week notes - 2020 w39 - worklog - A new era

    So the Mozilla Webcompat team is entering a new era. Mike Taylor (by the time this will be published) was the manager of the webcompat team at Mozilla since August 2015. He decided to leave. Monday, September 21 was his last day. We had to file an issue about this. The new interim manager is… well… myself. So last week and this week will be a lot about: * have a better understanding of the tasks and meetings that Mike was attending. * trying to readjust schedules and understanding how to get a bit of sleep with a distributed organization which has most of its meeting toward friendly European and American time zones. Basically, all meetings are outside the reasonable working timeframe (8:00 to 17:00 Japan Time). * trying to figure out how to switch from peer to manager with the other persons in the webcompat team. I want to remove any sources of stress.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: September 2020 Edition

Programming Leftovers

  • Code your first algorithm in Scratch

    With more kids learning from home this year, it's important to engage them with unique learning opportunities. The classroom looks very different than it did before, and it's going to continue to evolve. So should the lessons we teach. In the first article in this series, I shared how my students taught me to code. Over the next few weeks, I will be exploring how educators and parents can harness the power of coding to teach kids a wide variety of skills. "But I don't know anything about coding!" you may be shouting at your computer. That's one of the beauties of open source code: everyone is a learner, and everyone is a teacher. Whether you're new to coding or you've been doing it all your life, part of the process is making mistakes. It's all about problem-solving and learning how to find information. The greatest tool an educator has in a coding classroom is the phrase, "I don't know; let's find out together!"

  • 5 questions to ask yourself when writing project documentation

    Before getting down to the actual writing part of documenting another one of your open source projects, and even before interviewing the experts, it's a good idea to answer some high-level questions about your new document. [...] Or, what company is behind the document? What brand identity does it want to convey to its audience? The answer to this question will significantly influence your writing style. The company may also have its own style guide or at least a formal mission statement, in which case, you should start there. If the company is just starting out, you may ask the questions above to the document's owner. As the writer, it's important to integrate the voice and persona you create for the company with your own worldview and beliefs. This will make your writing sound more natural and less like company jargon.

  • 33 Excellent Free Books to Learn all about R

    The R language is the de facto standard among statisticians for the development of statistical software, and is widely used for statistical software development and data analysis. R is a modern dialect of S, one of several statistical programming languages designed at Bell Laboratories. R is much more than a programming language. It’s an interactive suite of software facilities for data manipulation, calculation, and graphical display. R offers a wide variety of statistical (linear and nonlinear modelling, classical statistical tests, time-series analysis, classification, clustering, …) and graphical techniques, and is highly extensible. The ability to download and install R packages is a key factor which makes R an excellent language to learn. What else makes R awesome? Here’s a taster.

  • [Perl] while loops that have an index

    Perl got this syntax that allow to use a while loop without having to explicitly increment an index by doing an i++. It is made possible by the each function.

  • OO linked lists in Perl

    After many days, trying to implement linked lists by nested hash (link to Rosetta Code) (link to my code) or Struct::Dumb, I get how to write the (singly) linked list in object-oriented style by Perl. One with bless, another one with Moose. Keep the learning record here.

  • Find all the prime numbers less than 'n' in O(n) Time complexity

    Our task is to find all the prime numbers that are less than n in Linear Time. We use Sieve of Eratosthenes to find the prime numbers till n. But the time complexity is O(N log (log N)). Here our desired time complexity is O(N). Hence a modified version of the Sieve of Eratosthenes is to be used.

  • PyPy 7.3.2 triple release: python 2.7, 3.6, and 3.7

    The interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the multiple release. This is a micro release, all APIs are compatible with the 7.3.0 (Dec 2019) and 7.3.1 (April 2020) releases, but read on to find out what is new. Conda Forge now supports PyPy as a python interpreter. The support is quite complete for linux and macOS. This is the result of a lot of hard work and good will on the part of the Conda Forge team. A big shout out to them for taking this on. Development of PyPy has transitioning to https://foss.heptapod.net/pypy/pypy. This move was covered more extensively in this blog post. We have seen an increase in the number of drive-by contributors who are able to use gitlab + mercurial to create merge requests. The CFFI backend has been updated to version 1.14.2. We recommend using CFFI rather than c-extensions to interact with C, and using cppyy for performant wrapping of C++ code for Python.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (rails), openSUSE (chromium, jasper, ovmf, roundcubemail, samba, and singularity), Oracle (firefox), SUSE (bcm43xx-firmware, firefox, libqt5-qtbase, qemu, and tiff), and Ubuntu (aptdaemon, atftp, awl, packagekit, and spip).

  • Foreign Hackers Cripple Texas County’s Email System, Raising Election Security Concerns

    Last week, voters and election administrators who emailed Leanne Jackson, the clerk of rural Hamilton County in central Texas, received bureaucratic-looking replies. “Re: official precinct results,” one subject line read. The text supplied passwords for an attached file.

    But Jackson didn’t send the messages. Instead, they came from Sri Lankan and Congolese email addresses, and they cleverly hid malicious software inside a Microsoft Word attachment. By the time Jackson learned about the forgery, it was too late. Hackers continued to fire off look-alike replies. Jackson’s three-person office, already grappling with the coronavirus pandemic, ground to a near standstill.

  • Windows XP Source Code Reportedly Leaked, Posted to 4chan
  • Windows XP source code leaked online, on 4chan, out of all places
  • [Attacker] Accessed Network of U.S. Agency and Downloaded Data

    An unnamed U.S. federal agency was hit with a cyber-attack after a [attacker] used valid access credentials, authorities said on Thursday.

    While many details of the hack weren’t revealed, federal authorities did divulge that the [attacker] was able to browse directories, copy at least one file and exfiltrate data, according to the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency, known as CISA.

    The [attacker] implanted malware that evaded the agency’s protection system and was able to gain access to the network by using valid access credentials for multiple users’ Microsoft 365 accounts and domain administrator accounts, according to authorities.

New in calibre 5.0

Welcome back, calibre users. It has been a year since calibre 4.0. The two headline features are Highlighting support in the calibre E-book viewer and that calibre has now moved to Python 3. There has been a lot of work on the calibre E-book viewer. It now supports Highlighting. The highlights can be colors, underlines, strikethrough, etc. and have added notes. All highlights can be both stored in EPUB files for easy sharing and centrally in the calibre library for easy browsing. Additionally, the E-book viewer now supports both vertical and right-to-left text. calibre has moved to using Python 3. This is because Python 2 was end-of-lifed this year. This should be completely transparent to calibre users, the only caveat being that some third party calibre plugins have not yet been ported to Python 3 and therefore will not work in calibre 5. For status on the various plugin ports, see here. This effort involved porting half-a-million lines of Python code and tens-of-thousands of lines of extension code to Python 3. This would not have been possible without the help of Eli Schwartz and Flaviu Tamas. Read more Also: 5 Best free software for disk imaging or cloning hard drives