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Debian

Debian News

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Debian
  • My Debian Activities in November 2016

    This month I marked 377 packages for accept and rejected 36 packages. I also sent 13 emails to maintainers asking questions.

  • Debian LTS report for November 2016

    Noevember 2016 was my third month as a Debian LTS team member. I was allocated 11 hours and had 1,75 hours left from October. This makes a total of 12,75 hours. In November I spent all 12,75 hours (and even a bit more) preparing security updates for spip, memcached and monit.

  • Free software activities in November 2016

    Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, most software is distributed pre-compiled to end users.

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to permit verification that no flaws have been introduced — either maliciously or accidentally — during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

Devuan GNU/Linux Continues Its Vision of Providing Debian Without Systemd

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GNU
Linux
Debian

It appears that the developers behind the Debian-based Devuan GNU/Linux operating system continue to pursue their vision of providing a libre Debian fork without the systemd init system.

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Also: Devuan 1.0 Jessie beta 2: That’s Debian Jessie minus systemd

Devuan and Ubuntu

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • New Devuan Beta, Sharket Mare, 2016 Predictions

    Not even 24 hours after my saying there hasn't been a new Devuan release since April, the project released Beta 2 for 32 and 64-bit machines. Elsewhere, Jeremy Garcia celebrates 16 years of LinuxQuestions.org and writer-blogger Bruce Byfield today said that Linux and its application are commercial grade despite what some may think. The Ubuntu 17.04 release schedule was posted and Canonical has approved Snaps sans dependencies.

  • Systemd-Free Debian Fork Devuan Releases Its Second Beta
  • Docker and Canonical partner on CS Docker Engine for millions of Ubuntu users
  • Docker, Canonical Team Up on CS Docker Engine for Ubuntu

    When it comes to containers, Canonical has been early to make many of the right moves. The company was one one of the first to weave in platform support for Docker, which is partly significant because the majority of OpenStack deployments are built on Ubuntu.

    Now, Docker and Canonical have announced an integrated Commercially Supported (CS) Docker Engine offering on Ubuntu, meant to provide Canonical customers with a single path for support of the Ubuntu operating system and CS Docker Engine in enterprise Docker operations.

  • Ubuntu devs can now build Snaps without dependencies

    To encourage app distribution advancements, Canonical is now letting Ubuntu app developers build their Snaps without bundling their dependencies. The new support comes through the ubuntu-app-platform snap that has just been reached the Ubuntu Software store.

systemd free Linux distro Devuan releases second beta

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Debian

The self-proclaimed “Veteran Unix Admins” forking Debian in the name of init freedom have released Beta 2 of their “Devuan” Linux distribution.

Devuan came about after some users felt it had become too desktop-friendly. The change the greybeards objected to most was the decision to replace sysvinit init with systemd, a move felt to betray core Unix principles of user choice and keeping bloat to a bare minimum.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Project News - November 28th, 2016

    Welcome to this year's fourth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.

  • 4 Snap Apps You Can Install on Ubuntu Right Now

    In the mood to read a quick round-up of a some popular desktop Linux apps that are now available to install as Snappy apps?

    Me too, so I wrote one.

    For the purposes of this post (read: cos i’m lazy) you won’t find apps that are not intended to be distributed widely listed (i.e. apps which require an argument to be passed to install them, like Dekko, LibreOffice, and others).

    If you’re on a metered internet connection (or subsisting on a slow one) installing apps as Snaps probably isn’t the most effective use of your bandwidth. Until Snap frameworks (or whatever Canonical calls Snap dependencies) arrive most Snaps that you install are bundled with everything needed to run.

  • Ubuntu Prepping Its 16.04 "Rolling HWE Kernel"

    Similar to past Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) releases, Ubuntu 16.04.2 and beyond will feature hardware enablement kernels back-ported from newer Ubuntu releases in order to allow new hardware to work on these older LTS releases, but now the Xenial Xerus is switching to a concept of a "rolling HWE kernel."

    Canonical's Leann Ogasawara describes the rolling HWE kernel as, "The biggest change is that we are moving to what we refer to as a "rolling HWE kernel" model. Essentially, consumers of an HWE kernel will automatically be upgraded to the next HWE kernel offered in subsequent point releases until reaching the final HWE Kernel offered in 16.04.5." So it's really not like a true rolling Linux kernel, just that you will automatically be upgraded to future HWE kernels with future LTS point releases. It's documented more at this Wiki page.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • The Systemd-Free Debian Fork Celebrates Its Second Birthday

    Devuan, the Debian fork that frees the system of systemd, is now two years old.

    Yesterday marked two years since the announcement of the systemd-free Debian fork, Devuan.

    Two years going, this Linux OS that aims for "Init Freedom" isn't the most vibrant distribution out there. When's the last time you've heard of Devuan or even used it yourself? This year much of the systemd "hate" seems to have calmed down compared to prior years, although new features continue to be tacked onto systemd. Here's an interesting Google Trends comparison for those interested.

  • Debian with three monitors under low cost graphics interface

    Since 2008 I use two monitors in my desktop. Yesterday I bought a new graphics interface and a third monitor. Some time I was looking for a low cost graphics interface. Ok, I am using GeForce GT 740 which has three output ports: VGA, DVI and HDMI. In Brazil this interface card can be found around R$ 400 (US$ 117, but my card was US$ 87 in Brazilian Black Friday). In Amazon.com, it is between US$ 51 and US$ 109. The chosen manufacturer was Zotac, but all GT 740 and 750 will work fine (I tested the GT 750 too).

  • Canonical Announces the Availability of Ubuntu Advantage VG on AWS Marketplace

    Canonical, through Udi Nachmany, head of the Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud program, was proud to announce the availability for purchase of Ubuntu Advantage Virtual Guests on the AWS marketplace.

  • Mir is not only about Unity8

    Mir is a project to support the management applications on the display(s) of a computer. It can be compared to the more familiar X-Windows used on the current Ubuntu desktop (and many others). I’ll discuss some of the motivation for Mir below, but the point of this post is to clarify the relationship between Mir and Unity8.

  • Mir/Ubuntu Developer Talks Up Mir Outside Of Unity 8

    Most talk these days of Ubuntu's Unity 8 next-gen desktop experience and their Mir display server goes hand-in-hand since the change-over is planned in-step before Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, but there's a new Ubuntu Insights blog post up working to promote Mir as more than just tech for the Unity 8 desktop.

    Canonical engineer Alan Griffith has written a blog post today about Mir outside of Unity 8. Mir's abstraction layer is providing libmiral.so as a stable library to Mir providing window manager, the miral-shell providing both traditional and tiling window manager, and miral-kiosk as a sample "kiosk" with basic window management.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) – Overview

    Ubuntu 17.04, code named Zesty Zapus, is the future release that will succeed Ubuntu 16.10, and even though it’s End of life date has been scheduled for January 2018, the development team aims to bring a lot of upgrades, fixes, and additions in this release.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 (Nev) and 8.10 (Erik) Get New Security Updates from Debian

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Today, November 27, 2016, the developers of the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux distribution announced the availability of new security updates for the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" and 8.15 "Nev" releases.

While the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" release is still in the works, it gets the same security update as Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik," which are being ported from the upstream repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" (a.k.a. Debian Stable) to Parsix GNU/Linux's own repos.

It's been a week since our previous report on the security updates pushed to the stable Parsix GNU/Linux repositories, and we're seeing updated versions of the Vim text editor, Apache Tomcat 7 and 8 Java Servlet Containers, as well as Wireshark network protocol analyzer.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian putting everything on the /usr

    Debian is preparing to revise its default file system mapping to bring it in in line with other major distributions (like Fedora and CentOS).

    Evidence of the shift can be found in the bootstrap option that's arrived in its unstable branch, where Debian dev Ansgar Burchardt posted news that mailing list announcement: “debootstrap in unstable can now install with merged-/usr, that is with /bin, /sbin, /lib* being symlinks to their counterpart in /usr.”

  • Distrowatch Rankings Compared: 2006 vs 2016
  • A Brief Introduction to LXC Containers

    I recently found myself needing a machine to compile binaries on for a CentOS server. I first considered actually spinning up a CentOS system on a VPS; however, that seemed a little overboard just for compiling, I then realized that this would be the perfect use for a container. I could have an identical system to the one where the binaries will be deployed on, and at little cost since it can simply be blown away when I’m done. In order to set up my compile machine I used LXC.

    LXC, or “Linux Containers”, are a set of tools for creating full-featured containers. Compared to other tools such as systemd-nspawn, LXC is much more complex, and it has been used to build projects such as Docker. Docker has since moved away from LXC, however LXC is still one of the huge players in the Linux container game. The Linux container project also brings LXD, a daemon that can be used to manage containers. LXD makes a larger use of system images, as opposed to templates, in order to allow quick deployment of containers. Together these projects allow easy deployment and management of containers, as well as as advanced features and customizability.

  • New snapd 2.18 release and new candidate core snap
  • What's new in Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) - an overview

    The Ubuntu 16.10 operating system was released last month. The new version, which is also called Yakkety Yak, came around six months after Canonical - the company behind Ubuntu - released version 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) of the Linux-based operating system.

    We've already discussed the changes that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS brought along, so in this article we'll be covering a quick overview of Ubuntu 16.10 desktop, essentially focusing on the major new features/changes it brings to the table when compared to version 16.04 LTS.

Debian News

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Debian
  • Starting the faster, more secure APT 1.4 series

    We just released the first beta of APT 1.4 to Debian unstable (beta here means that we don’t know any other big stuff to add to it, but are still open to further extensions). This is the release series that will be released with Debian stretch, Ubuntu zesty, and possibly Ubuntu zesty+1 (if the Debian freeze takes a very long time, even zesty+2 is possible). It should reach the master archive in a few hours, and your mirrors shortly after that.

  • Debian package build tools

    When I was first introduced to Debian packaging, people recommended I use pbuilder. Given how complex the toolchain is in the pbuilder case, I don’t understand why that is (was?) a common recommendation.

  • vmdebootstrap Sprint Report

    This is now a little overdue, but here it is. On the 10th and 11th of November, the second vmdebootstrap sprint took place. Lars Wirzenius (liw), Ana Custura (ana_c) and myself were present. liw focussed on the core of vmdebootstrap, where he sketched out what the future of vmdebootstrap may look like. He documented this in a mailing list post and also presented (video).

    Ana and myself worked on live-wrapper, which uses vmdebootstrap internally for the squashfs generation. I worked on improving logging, using a better method for getting paths within the image, enabling generation of Packages and Release files for the image archive and also made the images installable (live-wrapper 0.5 onwards will include an installer by default).

  • Quicker Debian installations using eatmydata

    Two years ago, I did some experiments with eatmydata and the Debian installation system, observing how using eatmydata could speed up the installation quite a bit. My testing measured speedup around 20-40 percent for Debian Edu, where we install around 1000 packages from within the installer. The eatmydata package provide a way to disable/delay file system flushing. This is a bit risky in the general case, as files that should be stored on disk will stay only in memory a bit longer than expected, causing problems if a machine crashes at an inconvenient time. But for an installation, if the machine crashes during installation the process is normally restarted, and avoiding disk operations as much as possible to speed up the process make perfect sense.

antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" Linux OS Is Just Around the Corner, RC1 Out Now

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GNU
Linux
Debian

During the first days of November, we reported that the antiX MX-16 "Metamorphosis" Linux operating system entered development, and that it will be based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.6 "Jessie".

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More in Tux Machines

SUSE Leftovers

  • openSUSE Heroes meeting, day 2
    After a long, but exciting first day, we even managed to get some sleep before we started again and discussed the whole morning about our policies and other stuff that is now updated in the openSUSE wiki. After that, we went out for a nice lunch…
  • Installing Tumbleweed, November 2016
    The Tumbleweed system that I already have installed had desktops KDE, Gnome, XFCE and LXDE. But for recent intstalls (as with Leap 42.2), I have been going with KDE, Gnome, XFCE, LXQt, FVWM and MATE. So it seemed reasonable for the new Tumbleweed install to follow the same path. I also added Enlightenment for experimenting.

Android Leftovers

Linux Graphics

  • LibRetro's Vulkan PlayStation PSX Renderer Released
    A few days back I wrote about a Vulkan renderer for a PlayStation emulator being worked on and now the code to that Vulkan renderer is publicly available. For those wanting to relive some PlayStation One games this week or just looking for a new test case for Vulkan drivers, the Vulkan renderer for the LibRetro Beetle/Mednafen PSX emulator is now available, months after the LibRetro folks made a Vulkan renderer for the Nintendo 64 emulator.
  • Etnaviv DRM Updates Submitted For Linux 4.10
    The Etnaviv DRM-Next pull request is not nearly as exciting as MSM getting Adreno 500 series support, a lot of Intel changes, or the numerous AMDGPU changes, but it's not bad either for a community-driven, reverse-engineered DRM driver for the Vivante graphics cores.
  • Mesa 12.0.4 Being Prepped For Ubuntu 16.10/16.04
    Ubuntu is preparing Mesa 12.0.4 for Ubuntu Xenial and Yakkety users. It's not as great as Mesa 13, but at least there are some important fixes back-ported. Mesa 12.0.4 is exciting for dozens of bug fixes, including the work to offer better RadeonSI performance. But with Mesa 12.0.4 you don't have the RADV Vulkan driver, OpenGL 4.5, or the other exciting Mesa 13 work.

Games for GNU/Linux