Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

Debian/Ubuntu: Q4OS, Ubuntu Dock and LXD Weekly Status Update

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • There's Now a Windows 10 Installer for the Debian-Based Q4OS Linux Distribution

    The Q4OS development team is pleased to inform us today about the immediate availability for download of a Windows installer for their Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution, Q4OS, allowing users to create a dual-boot environment on their PCs.

    For those not familiar to Q4OS, it's an open-source and free Linux distro based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux operating system and built around the Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE), which resembles the look and feel of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop environment.

    Created with an emphasis on Windows users who want to migrate to a free, open-source, and more secure operating system, Q4OS now lets them install the distribution alongside Microsoft Windows in an easy manner, without having to do any modifications to your personal computer or install any other apps.

  • Ubuntu Dock Now Has Dynamic Transparency

    Ubuntu devs have listened to our gripe on the jarring contrast between GNOME 3.26's transparent top bar and the Ubuntu Dock.

  • Ubuntu Dock Features Adaptive Transparency on Ubuntu 17.10, Here's How It Works

    Ubuntu contributor Didier Roche continues his development on the look and feel of the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and today he announced that Ubuntu Dock is getting adaptive transparency.

    Canonical confirmed that Ubuntu 17.10 would come with the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment by default, though the default session has suffered numerous modifications compared to the vanilla one to make things easier for those using the Unity interface on Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

    Most probably, Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users won't upgrade to Ubuntu 17.10, but we're sure Ubuntu 17.04 users will because it'll reach end of life in about four months from the moment of writing, sometime in January 2018. Therefore, Canonical wants to make their Unity to GNOME transition as painless as possible.

  • LXD: Weekly Status #15

    This week has been pretty quiet as far as upstream changes since half the team was attending the Open Source Summity, the Linux Plumbers Conference and the Linux Security Summit in Los Angeles, California.

Debian Development Reports

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Free software log (July and August 2017)

    August was DebConf, which included a ton of Policy work thanks to Sean Whitton's energy and encouragement. During DebConf, we incorporated work from Hideki Yamane to convert Policy to reStructuredText, which has already made it far easier to maintain. (Thanks also to David Bremner for a lot of proofreading of the result.) We also did a massive bug triage and closed a ton of older bugs on which there had been no forward progress for many years.

    After DebConf, as expected, we flushed out various bugs in the reStructuredText conversion and build infrastructure. I fixed a variety of build and packaging issues and started doing some more formatting cleanup, including moving some footnotes to make the resulting document more readable.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2017

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #125

    16 package reviews have been added, 99 have been updated and 92 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

Debian: Tails 3.2 RC, Debian Policy, and Mini-DebConf 2017 Conference

Filed under
Debian
  • Tails 3.2 release candidate has been released for testing

    The LiveUSB Linux distribution, Tails (the amnesic incognito live system), has received a new release candidate for the upcoming 3.2 update that’s due out on the 26th of this month. The update comes with some big under-the-hood changes to the system which should improve hardware support and the email experience.

    If you’ve ever decided to try Tails on newer hardware, you may have had some driver issues; with this release, Tails ships with the Linux 4.12.12 kernel which is one of the latest. With it, users will get a better hardware experience; for example, the NVIDIA Maxwell series of graphics cards are now supported.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- September 2017
  • Mini-DebConf 2017 Debian Conference to Take Place November 23-26 in Cambridge UK

    Debian developer and leader of the debian-cd project Steve McIntyre announced the official dates and schedule of this year's Mini-DebConf conference for Debian developers and users.

    The Mini-DebConf 2017 conference will take place for four days, from Thursday, November 23 until Sunday, November 26, and it will be hosted at Arm's office in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Arm is Steve McIntyre's employer and the industry's leading supplier of microprocessors for embedded and IoT devices.

    "I'm organizing another mini-DebConf in Cambridge this year. Again, my employer Arm is going to host the conference for four days in November," said Steve McIntyre in the mailing list announcement. "I'm also hoping to find sponsors again to cover some other costs for the conference for things like food - please contact me if you can help!"

Ethical Hacking Distro Parrot Security Gets ZFS Support, It's Based on Debian 10

Filed under
Debian

Parrot Security OS, the security-oriented GNU/Linux distribution designed with IoT (Internet of Things) security, ethical hacking, and cloud-based penetration testing in mind, has been updated recently to version 3.8.

Read more

Debian Development and News: Google Blobs, RcppMsgPack 0.2.0, RcppRedis 0.1.8 and devscripts needs YOU!

Filed under
Development
Debian
  • Google Hangouts in Debian testing (Buster)

    Google offers a lot of software components packaged specifically for Debian and Debian-like Linux distributions. Examples are: Chrome, Earth and the Hangouts plugin. Also, there are many other Internet services doing the same: Spotify, Dropbox, etc. I’m really grateful for them, since this make our life easier.

    Problem is that our ecosystem is rather complex, with many distributions and many versions out there. I guess is not an easy task for them to keep such a big variety of support variations.

  • RcppMsgPack 0.2.0
  • RcppRedis 0.1.8
  • devscripts needs YOU!

    Over the past 10 years, I've been a member of a dwindling team of people maintaining the devscripts package in Debian.

  • My Free Software Activities in August 2017

    Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian.

A look at TAILS – Privacy oriented GNU/Linux Distribution

Filed under
Reviews
Security
Debian

The Amensic Incognito Live System, is a Debian based distribution that routes all internet traffic through the TOR network, and leaves no trace of its existence or anything done on the system when the machine is shut down. The obvious aim in this, is to aid in keeping the user anonymous and private. Tails is not installed to a users computer, but instead is run strictly as a LiveUSB / LiveDVD.

TAILS does not utilize the host machines Hard Disk at all, and is loaded entirely into RAM. When a machine is shut down, the data that is stored in RAM disappears over the course of a few minutes, essentially leaving no trace of whatever had been done. Granted, there is a method of attack known as a Cold Boot Attack, where data is extracted from RAM before it has had a chance to disappear, but TAILS has you covered on that front too; the TAILS website says,

“To prevent this attack, the data in RAM is overwritten by random data when shutting down Tails. This erases all traces from your session on that computer.”

Read more

Debian-Based Univention Corporate Server 4.2 Linux Gets Second Security Update

Filed under
Debian

Univention's Maren Abatielos is pleased to inform us about the availability of the second point release of the Debian-based Univention Corporate Server (UCS) 4.2 operating system for servers and the cloud.

Read more

Debian 10 "Buster" Switches GNOME Session To Wayland By Default

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian 10 "Buster" Switches GNOME Session To Wayland By Default

    For those not riding the in-development Debian "Buster" packages or the "Sid" bleeding-edge packages, the default desktop GNOME session is using Wayland by default.

    Changed back in July for Debian Sid and then during the middle of August for the Buster packaging, the gnome-session for Debian testing/Buster is defaulting to Wayland as outlined via the change-log (thanks to reader Fran for pointing it out).

  • Debian 10 development builds switch to Wayland

    Work on Debian 10 is under way already even though we won’t see it ready for mainstream consumption until 2019. One of the latest changes discovered in Debian 10 is that it drops X11 for Wayland. Debian is considered quite conservative in terms of how quickly it adopts new technologies in order to provide a stable experience and therefore will still continue to offer X11 as an alternative.

Debian and Ubuntu: MATE in Debian, Ubuntu Server Development, Linux Mint 18.3

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • MATE 1.18 landed in Debian testing

    This is to announce that finally all MATE Desktop 1.18 components have landed in Debian testing (aka buster).

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 05 Sep 2017

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • Artful Aardvark Beta 1 Released!
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 518
  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Preview Part 4: New Theme!

    The latest upgrade to Artful gives me GNOME Shell 3.25.19 with beautiful interface changes! It has new theme, new look, new login screen color, more orange color style everywhere. This new look is a new step towards GNOME 3.26 planned for Artful final version. Overall, as an Ubuntu user I like this interface. Thanks to all Ubuntu developers especially Didier Roche.

  • Linux Mint 18.3 Features & Release Date — What’s Hot In Next Version

    Linux Mint 18.2 ‘Sonya’, based on Ubuntu 16.04.02 LTS, was released in June with MATE 1.18, KDE 5.8, Xfce 4.12, and Cinnamon 3.4 desktop environments. That release, obviously, started the development process for the next iteration, i.e., Linux Mint 18.3.

    Linux Mint 18.3 Release Date

    On Linux Mint blog, the development team has started telling about the features that are getting implemented. But, what about Mint 18.3 release date? As Mint 18.2, based on Ubuntu 16.04.2, was released in June 2017, we can expect Mint 18.3 towards the end of December 2017 with Ubuntu 16.04.3 base.

Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Installer Enters Alpha with Linux 4.12 Support

Filed under
Debian

Work on the next major version of the Debian GNU/Linux operating system is ongoing since early July, a couple of weeks after the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" series arrived, and it now looks like it's already in Alpha stages of development.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%