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Debian

Tails 3.11 and Tor Transparency (Financials)

Filed under
Security
Debian

Deepin Builds a Better Linux Desktop

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Reviews
Debian

Deepin 15.8, released last month, is loaded with more efficient layout tweaks that give the distribution greater functionality and maturity.

Deepin, based in China, shed its Ubuntu base when with the 2015 release of version 15, which favored Debian Linux. That brought numerous subtle changes in the code base and software roots. Ubuntu Linux itself is based on Debian.

The chief distinguishing factor that accounts for Deepin's growing popularity is its homegrown Deepin Desktop Environment (DDE). One of the more modern desktop environments, it is one of the first Linux distros to take advantage of HTML 5 technology.

Coinciding with the base affiliation change, the developers, Deepin Technology, slightly changed the distro's name. What was "Deepin Linux" is now "deepin." That subtle rebranding is an attempt to differentiate previous releases named "Deepin," "Linux Deepin" and "Hiweed GNU/Linux."

Regardless of whether the name is rendered as "deepin" or "Deepin Linux," this distro offers users an eloquent, modern-themed Linux OS. It is easy to use and comes with high-quality software developed in-house.

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Fedora and Debian Development Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
Debian
  • Fedora 27 Officially Retired

    Fedora 27 has officially reached the End of Life (EOL) status on November 30, so no further updates and security patches would be released beyond this date.

    Officially shipped on November 14, 2017, Fedora 27 has received approximately 9,500 updates according to official data.

    However, with Fedora 28 and Fedora 29 already up for grabs, it makes sense for this old version to be retired, and now all users are recommended to update their devices as soon as possible to the latest releases.

  • Ankur Sinha "FranciscoD": NeuroFedora update: week 48
  • My Debian Activities in November 2018

    This month I accepted 486 packages, which is twice as much as last month. On the other side I was a bit reluctant and rejected only 38 uploads. The overall number of packages that got accepted this month was 556.

  • My Work on Debian LTS/ELTS (November 2018)

    In November 2018, I have worked on the Debian LTS project for nine hours as a paid contributor. Of the originally planned twelve hours (four of them carried over from October) I gave two hours back to the pool of available work hours and carry one hour over to December.

    For November, I also signed up for four hours of ELTS work, but had to realize that at the end of the month, I hadn't even set up a test environment for Debian wheezy ELTS, so I gave these four hours back to the "pool". I have started getting an overview of the ELTS workflow now and will start fixing packages in December.

Debian and Mozilla Development Reports for Last Month

Filed under
Moz/FF
Debian

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • glBSP

    I was surprised to see glBSP come up for adoption; I found out when I was installing something entirely unrelated, thanks to the how-can-i-help package. (This package is a great idea: it tells you about packages you have installed which are in danger of being removed from Debian, or have other interesting bugs filed against them. Give it a go!) glBSP is a dependency on another of my packages, WadC, so I adopted it fairly urgently.

    glBSP is a node-building tool for Doom maps. A Map in Doom is defined in a handful of different lumps of data. The top-level, canonical data structures are relatively simple: THINGS is a list of things (type, coordinates, angle facing); VERTEXES is a list of points for geometry (X/Y coordinates); SECTORS define regions (light level, floor height and texture,…), etc. Map authoring tools can build these lumps of data relatively easily. (I've done it myself: I generate them all in liquorice, that I should write more about one day.)

  • How to Connect Your Android Phone to Ubuntu Wirelessly

    Easy: all you need is a modern Linux distro like Ubuntu and an open-source GNOME Shell extension called ‘GSConnect‘.

    GSConnect is a totally free, feature packed add-on that lets you connect your Android phone to Ubuntu over a wireless network, no USB cable required!

    In this post we talk about the features the extension offers, and show you how to install GSConnect on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and above so that you can try it out for yourself!

Debian: Rust, Outreachy and More

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Debian
  • Debian, Rust, and librsvg

    Debian supports many architectures and, even for those it does not officially support, there are Debian ports that try to fill in the gap. For most user applications, it is mostly a matter of getting GCC up and running for the architecture in question, then building all of the different packages that Debian provides. But for packages that need to be built with LLVM—applications or libraries that use Rust, for example—that simple recipe becomes more complicated. How much the lack of Rust support for an unofficial architecture should hold back the rest of the distribution was the subject of a somewhat acrimonious discussion recently.

    The issue came up on the debian-devel mailing list when John Paul Adrian Glaubitz complained about the upload of a new version of librsvg to unstable. Librsvg is used to render Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) images; the project has recently been switching some of its code from C to Rust, presumably for the memory safety offered by Rust. Glaubitz said that the new "Rust-ified" library had been uploaded with no warning when the package maintainer "knows very well that this particular package has a huge number of reverse dependencies and would cause a lot of problems with non-Rust targets now". The reverse dependencies are the packages that rely on librsvg in this case.

  • Debian welcomes its new Outreachy intern

    Debian continues participating in Outreachy, and we'd like to welcome our new Outreachy intern for this round, lasting from December 2018 to March 2019.

    Anastasia Tsikoza will work on Improving the integration of Debian derivatives with the Debian infrastructure and the community, mentored by Paul Wise and Raju Devidas.

    Congratulations, Anastasia, and welcome!

Debian Leftovers

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Debian

ASUS Pushes Out TinkerOS 2.0.8 With Many Updates To Its Debian Linux Image

Filed under
Hardware
Debian

For those with an ASUS Tinker Board, the Debian-based TinkerOS has an updated operating system release.

The Tinker Board that comes in at about twice the price of a Raspberry Pi but with significantly better performance has out an official operating system update. TinkerOS 2.0.8 pulls in the latest Mali graphics driver, is updated to the Linux 4.4.132 LTS kernel, now supports Wake-On-LAN from suspend-to-RAM, supports WiFi Direct, improves HDMI hot-plug detection, and has a number of other improvements.

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Deepin 15.8 Promo Video Proves Distro Deserves ‘Blingiest Desktop’ Crown

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

The recent Deepin 15.8 release impressed many on its arrival — now a new promo video published by the team behind demonstrates precisely why.

The five-minute clip, which we’ve embedded above, showcases the distro’s recent crop of UI changes and UX tweaks, including a new boot menu, disk encryption feature, and optional ‘dark mode’.

And call me sucker for eye candy but it all looks terrifically bling-bling. Whether the blurred ‘fluent design’ aesthetic is to your own personal tastes or not, isn’t it great to see that such a distinctly different desktop available?

Read more

New Reviews of Deepin 15.8 (Debian-based, China-made)

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Reviews
Debian
  • A Linux Noob Reviews: The Deepin 15.8 Installer

    As someone relatively new to Linux land, I may not seem like the ideal candidate to critically evaluate a Linux desktop OS installer. Then again, since beginning my regular Linux coverage I've been focused on relating to fellow beginners or people interested in making the jump from either Windows or macOS. And the first point of contact with any Linux distribution (beyond the website) is normally the installer. It's where you start to fall in love or begin to pull your hair out in frustration.

    Linux installers can be many things. Streamlined, elegant affairs taking mere minutes until you're up and running. They can be satisfying challenges. In some cases they can be complete deal breakers based on your skill level. They are the doorway to what could be your next daily driver, or the on-ramp to a continuing search.

    So in these reviews I'll show you every single step the installer guides you through, and point out the thoughtful touches that make the experience better than most. Or the potential barriers that could stop you in your tracks.

    Alright, let's talk about Deepin 15.8 and begin by getting in front of a ridiculous rumor that practically turned into a witch hunt. Yes, it's from China. No, that doesn't mean it's spyware. From what I've gathered, the developers had installed a traffic analytics tracking service into their Deepin Install app store (you can see that source code here). While the presence of traffics analytics in Deepin software can be debated, there was never anything malicious happening. And as of Deepin 15.8, it has been removed anyway.

  • Deepin 15.8 Run Through

    In this video, we look at Deepin 15.8, the latest release of the Rolling Deepin, as normal I use VirtualBox for all my videos and Deepin is a bit stucky in it.

  • Deepin 15.8 overview | Attractive and Efficient, Excellent User Experience

    Hiweed GNU/Linux) is a Debian-based distribution (it was Ubuntu-based until version 15 released in late 2015) that aims to provide an elegant, user-friendly and reliable operating system. It does not only include the best the open source world has to offer, but it has also created its own desktop environment called DDE or Deepin Desktop Environment which is based on the Qt 5 toolkit. Deepin focuses much of its attention on intuitive design. Its home-grown applications, like Deepin Software Centre, DMusic and DPlayer are tailored to the average user.

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More in Tux Machines

ODROID-XU4: Much Better Performance Than The Raspberry Pi Plus USB3 & Gigabit Ethernet @ $60

Hardkernel recently sent over the ODROUD-XU4 for benchmarking. This ARM SBC that just measures in at about 82 x 58 x 22 mm offers much better performance than many of the sub-$100 ARM SBCs while also featuring dual USB 3.0 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, eMMC storage, and is software compatible with the older XU3 ARM SBCs. Here's a look at the performance of the ODROID-XU4 compared to a variety of other single board computers. This ~$60+ ARM single board computer is built around a Samsung Exynos5422 SoC that features four Cortex-A15 cores at 2.0GHz and four Cortex-A7 cores at 1.3GHz while the graphics are provided by a Mali-T628. Read more

Six-port network appliance runs Linux on Atom C3558

Acrosser’s compact “AND-DNV3N2” networking appliance runs Linux on a quad-core, 2.2GHz Atom C3558 and offers a SATA-III bay, 2x mini-PCIe and USB 3.0 ports, and 6x GbE ports, two of which can be outfitted as fiber SFP ports. Acrosser, which says it is now an Intel IoT Solutions Alliance partner, announced a desktop network appliance available with 6x copper Gigabit Ethernet ports or 4x GbE and 2x fiber-optic SFP ports. Like Advantech’s 6x port FWA-1012VC appliance, the AND-DNV3N2 Micro Box Networking Appliance runs on a quad-core, 2.2GHz Atom C3558 “Denverton” server SoC. (The Advantech model also sells an 8-port variant with an octa-core C3758.) Read more

today's leftovers

  • Director v1.6.0 is available
    Icinga Director v1.6.0 has been released with Multi-Instance Support, Configuration Baskets and improved Health Checks. We’re excited to announce new features that will help you to work more efficiently.
  • Fedora Looks To Build Firefox With Clang For Better Performance & Compilation Speed
    Following the move by upstream Mozilla in switching their Linux builds of Firefox from being compiled by GCC to LLVM Clang, Fedora is planning the same transition of compilers in the name of compilation speed and resulting performance. FESCo Ticket 2020 laid out the case, "Mozilla upstream switches from gcc to clang and we're going to follow upstream here due to clang performance, maintenance costs and compilation speed. Tom Stellard (clang maintainer) has asked me to file this ticket to comply with Fedora processes."
  • Work in progress: PHP stack for EL-8
  • Sandwich-style SBC offers four 10GbE SFP+ ports
    SolidRun’s “ClearFog CX 8K” SBC is built around a “CEx7 A8040” COM Express Type 7 module that runs Linux on a quad -A72 Armada A8040. Features include 4x 10GbE SFP+ ports and mini-PCIe, M.2, and SATA expansion. In August, SolidRun updated its ClearFog line of Linux-driven router boards with a high-end ClearFog GT 8K SBC with the same 2GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 Marvell Armada A8040 SoC found on its MacchiatoBIN Double Shot Mini-ITX board. Now, the company has returned to the headless (no graphics) Armada A8040 with the ClearFog CX 8K. [..] It’s rare to see an Arm-based Type 7 module.
  • Watch Out: Clicking “Check for Updates” Still Installs Unstable Updates on Windows 10
    Microsoft hasn’t learned its lesson. If you click the “Check for Updates” button in the Settings app, Microsoft still considers you a “seeker” and will give you “preview” updates that haven’t gone through the normal testing process. This problem came to everyone’s attention with the release of the October 2018 Update. It was pulled for deleting people’s files, but anyone who clicked “Check for Updates” in the first few days effectively signed up as a tester and got the buggy update. The “Check for Updates” button apparently means “Please install potentially updates that haven’t gone through a normal testing process.”

OSS Leftovers

  • DAV1D v0.1 AV1 Video Decoder Released
    Out today is DAV1D as the first official (v0.1) release of this leading open-source AV1 video decoder. This release was decided since its quality is good enough for use, covers all AV1 specs and features, and is quite fast on desktop class hardware and improving for mobile SoCs.
  • PikcioChain plans for open-source MainNet in roadmap update
    France-based PikcioChain, a platform designed to handle and monetize personal data, has announced changes to its development roadmap as it looks towards the launch of its standalone MainNet and block explorer in the first quarter of 2019.
  • New Blockstream Bitcoin Block Explorer Announces The Release Of Its Open Source Code Esplora
    Blockstream has just announced a release of Esplora, its open source software. This is the software that keeps the website and network running. This new release follows on the heels of its block explorer that was released in November to the public. The company released the block explorer, and after making sure it was successful, released the code behind that block explorer. This way, developers can easily create their block explorers, build add-ons and extensions as well as contribute to Blockstream.info.
  • Will Concerns Break Open Source Containers?
    Open source containers, which isolate applications from the host system, appear to be gaining traction with IT professionals in the U.S. defense community. But for all their benefits, security remains a notable Achilles’ heel for a couple of reasons. First, containers are still fairly nascent, and many administrators are not yet completely familiar with their capabilities. It’s difficult to secure something you don’t completely understand. Second, containers are designed in a way that hampers visibility. This lack of visibility can make securing containers extremely taxing.
  • Huawei, RoboSense join group pushing open-source autonomous driving technology
    Telecommunications equipment giant Huawei Technologies, its semiconductor subsidiary HiSilicon and RoboSense, a maker of lidar sensors used in driverless cars, have become the first Chinese companies to help establish an international non-profit group that supports open-source autonomous driving projects. The three firms are among the more than 20 founding members of the Autoware Foundation, which aims to promote collaboration between corporate and academic research efforts in autonomous driving technology, according to a statement from the group on Monday. The foundation is an outgrowth of Autoware.AI, an open-source autonomous driving platform that was started by Nagoya University associate professor Shinpei Kato in 2015.
  • 40 top Linux and open source conferences in 2019
    Every year Opensource.com editors, writers, and readers attend open source-related conference and events hosted around the world. As we started planning our 2019 schedules, we rounded up a few top picks for the year. Which conferences do you plan to attend in 2019? If you don't see your conference on this list, be sure to tell us about it in the comments and add it to our community conference calendar. (And for more events to attend, check out The Enterprisers Project list of business leadership conferences worth exploring in 2019.)
  • Adding graphics to the Windows System for Linux [Ed: CBS is still employing loads of Microsoft boosters like Simon Bisson, to whom "Linux" is just something for Microsoft to swallow]/
  • Kong launches its fully managed API platform [Ed: Typical openwashing of APIs, even using the term "open source" where it clearly does not belong]g
  • How Shared, Open Data Can Help Us Better Overcome Disasters
    WHEN A MASSIVE earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant failed, leaking radioactive material into the atmosphere and water. People around the country as well as others with family and friends in Japan were, understandably, concerned about radiation levels—but there was no easy way for them to get that information. I was part of a small group of volunteers who came together to start a nonprofit organization, Safecast, to design, build, and deploy Geiger counters and a website that would eventually make more than 100 million measurements of radiation levels available to the public. We started in Japan, of course, but eventually people around the world joined the movement, creating an open global data set. The key to success was the mobile, easy to operate, high-quality but lower-cost kit that the Safecast team developed, which people could buy and build to collect data that they might then share on the Safecast website.