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Debian

Debian: Dirk Eddelbuettel's Code, Molly de Blanc Becomes Debian Developer, Iustin Pop on Debian DPL Election and Debian Bug Squashing Party

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Debian
  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tint 0.1.2: Some cleanups

    A new version 0.1.2 of the tint package is arriving at CRAN as I write this. It follows the recent 0.1.1 release which included two fabulous new vignettes featuring new font choices. The package name expands from tint is not tufte as the package offers a fresher take on the Tufte-style for html and pdf presentations.

    However, with the new vignettes in 0.1.1 we now had four full-length vignettes which made the package somewhat bulky. So for this release I reorganized things a little, added two new shorter vignettes with links to the full-length vignettes but keeping the size more constrained.

  • Molly de Blanc: developer

    I became a Debian Developer towards the end of 2018. I started the process in August 2017 at DebConf in Montreal. Over the course of 17 months I wrote emails, searched the Debian wiki, and learned a lot about the project.

  • Iustin Pop: Debian DPL election 2019

    As planned for this long weekend (in Switzerland), I went and re-read the platforms, and cast my vote. Which made me very happy, because I voted in the elections for the first time in a long while…

    But it didn’t start like that. The first call for nominations ended up with no (valid) nominations, and the follow-up thread was a bit depressing (high load for the DPL role, unclear expectations, etc.) For a time, it looked like the project is drifting, and some of the trolling on the list definitely didn’t help. I managed to prod a bit the thread and there was a nice reply from Lucas which seems to open the gates—the discussion livened up, and after many more meaningful mails, we ended up with 4 candidates. That’s, in my memory, a very good result.

  • Paris BSP and this blog

    I've never had a blog up to today, and apparently now I do. Why? Well, it happened that there was a Debian Bug Squashing Party in Paris a few weeks ago, and I thought that it might be nice to go, meet some nice people and humbly help releasing Buster. Great news is that the Debian project is willing to reimbourse its members some of the expenses for taking part to a BSP, asking in return to communicate publicly about what you do during a BSP so that others are motivated to participate as well.

    So I guessed that might be the occasion for me to start a blog, and start writing something about what I do in Debian. Here it goes!

    It was my first BSP ever, and I am very happy of it. We met for a couple of days at very nice Mozilla's office in Paris (I think they are moving and we were at the old one, though). We were probably around 15 people, mostly from France, Belgium, the Netherlands and UK (which is not surprising if you look at the high-speed rail map in Europe; or any map of Europe, as a matter of facts).

    The great thing of a BSP is that you have a very short loop to other developers. Since a BSP is all about getting RC bugs closed, it is useful to talk directly to Release Team members, and discuss whether they would unblock your fix or not when you are not sure. This saves a lot in terms of human bandwidth and context-switching. Also, I had the occasion to watch more experienced developers in action and learn how to tackle issues I haven't dealt with ever before, like bumping up a library SONAME.

Debian Web Team, Debian Long Term Support, and Security Leftovers

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Security
Debian
  • Debian Web Team Sprint 2019

    The Debian Web team held a sprint for the first time, in Madrid (Spain) from March 15th to March 17th, 2019.

    We discussed the status of the Debian website in general, review several important pages/sections and agreed on many things how to improve them.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, March 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, March 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Your Favorite Ad Blocker Can Be Exploited To Infect PCs With Malicious Code

    In July 2018, the popular Adblock Plus software released its version 3.2 that brought a new feature called $rewrite. This feature allowed one to change the filter rules and decide which content got blocked and which didn’t. It was said that often there are content elements that are difficult to block. This feature was soon implemented by AdBlock as well as uBlock.

    In a troubling development, it has been revealed that this filter option can be exploited by notorious actors to inject arbitrary code into the web pages. With more than 100 million users of these ad blocking tools, this exploit has great potential to harm the web users.

  • Adblock Plus filter lists may execute arbitrary code in web pages

    A new version of Adblock Plus was released on July 17, 2018. Version 3.2 introduced a new filter option for rewriting requests. A day later AdBlock followed suit and released support for the new filter option. uBlock, being owned by AdBlock, also implemented the feature.

    Under certain conditions the $rewrite filter option enables filter list maintainers to inject arbitrary code in web pages.

    The affected extensions have more than 100 million active users, and the feature is trivial to exploit in order to attack any sufficiently complex web service, including Google services, while attacks are difficult to detect and are deployable in all major browsers.

  • Big Companies Thought Insurance Covered a Cyberattack. They May Be Wrong.

    The disputes ares playing out in court. In a closely watched legal battle, Mondelez sued Zurich Insurance last year for a breach of contract in an Illinois court, and Merck filed a similar suit in New Jersey in August. Merck sued more than 20 insurers that rejected claims related to the NotPetya attack, including several that cited the war exemption. The two cases could take years to resolve.

    The legal fights will set a precedent about who pays when businesses are hit by a cyberattack blamed on a foreign government. The cases have broader implications for government officials, who have increasingly taken a bolder approach to naming-and-shaming state sponsors of cyberattacks, but now risk becoming enmeshed in corporate disputes by giving insurance companies a rationale to deny claims.

Debian 10 Buster's Installer Reaches RC Phase - Finally Offers Secure Boot Support

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Debian

While there are around 150 release critical bugs to be addressed before Debian 10.0 "Buster" can make its debut, the Debian Installer continues getting in great shape and is out today with its release candidate.

Debian Installer Buster RC1 is now available for testing as the first release candidate of the installer for this next major Debian GNU/Linux release. Most notable with today's RC1 release is finally having UEFI Secure Boot support in place for x86_64 (amd64) architecture. This will allow Debian to finally work out-of-the-box on SecureBoot-protected PCs after Debian 9 "Stretch" failed to get Secure Boot in order and thus Debian has been without this UEFI-based "security" feature until now.

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Also: Labtainers in a Web desktop through noVNC X11 proxy, full docker containers

Review: SolydXK 201902 "Xfce"

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Reviews
Debian

SolydXK is a Debian-based desktop distribution available in Xfce and KDE Plasma flavours. The distribution takes Debian's Stable branch and attempts to build a user friendly desktop experience on top of it. The latest version of the project adds new file system support for flash drives (offering f2fs and nilfs2 file systems). There have also been some changes in the arena of web browsers:
We changed the SolydXK Firefox settings even further to improve user privacy and also comply with Mozilla's distribution policies. This is done in the firefox-solydxk-adjustments package which can be purged if you don't need it.

Waterfox is now packaged and distributed by the SolydXK repository. You can install Waterfox with this command: apt install waterfox waterfox-solydxk-adjustments.
The official versions of SolydXK run on 64-bit (x86_64) machines only. There are 32-bit x86 ISO files provided by the community and there is a build for Raspberry Pi 3 computers. I opted to try the official Xfce edition which is a 1.5GB download.

The live media boots to the Xfce desktop. The live environment features bright orange wallpaper and offers a single icon on the desktop for launching the system installer. The desktop's panel, with the application menu and system tray, sit at the bottom of the screen.

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Debian 10 "Buster" Development and LTS Work

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Debian
  • Debian 10 "Buster" Has Around 150 Release Critical Bugs At The Moment

    Debian developer Jonathan Wiltshire who is part of the project's release team issued a Buster freeze status update on Sunday concerning the readiness of Debian 10.

    As of writing, Debian 10 "Buster" has around 150 release-critical bugs. These bugs must be addressed before the Debian 10.0 release can happen. There are also the non-release-critical bugs that are still being tackled, but as the official release nears, those non-blocker bugs will be deferred or rejected to focus on these 150 prominent issues.

  • Bits from the Release Team: buster freeze update

    Debian buster will ship with the same set of architectures as Debian stretch did.

  • Markus Koschany: My Free Software Activities in March 2019

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. ( a bit later than usual) If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

Help test Debian Live

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Debian

During the stretch release period, it became apparent that very few people had been testing Debian Live, and some nasty bugs were discovered only during final release testing. The final stretch images for Debian live wasn’t quite up to the quality the Debian community deserved, and it lead to Steve McIntyre asking “IMPORTANT: Do live Debian images have a future?“.

I decided to get involved and have been doing testing and bug fixes throughout the buster release cycle, and with today’s builds, I think we’re at a point where we have something good that’s ready for wide-scale testing.

The Buster live images come with something new that a bunch of other distributions have also adopted, which is the Calamares installer. Calamares is an independent installer project (They call it “The universal installer framework”) which offers a Qt based interface for installing a system. It doesn’t replace debian-installer on the live images, rather, it serves a different audience. Calamares is really easy to use, with friendly guided partitioning and really simple full-disk encryption setup. It doesn’t cover all the advanced features of debian-installer (although it very recently got RAID support) and it doesn’t have an unattended install mode either. However, for 95%+ of desktop and laptop users, Calamares is a much easier way to get a system installed, which makes it very appropriate for live systems. For anyone who needs anything more complicated, or who’s doing a mass-install, debian-installer is still available in both text and GUI forms.

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AV Linux to Drop 32-Bit Support, Focus Its Development on Debian 10 "Buster"

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GNU
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based AV Linux multimedia oriented GNU/Linux distribution have released a new version and announced some major upcoming changes in the development of the project.

AV Linux is currently based on the stable Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series and features support for both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, but AV Linux 2019.4.10 appears to be the last release with these features as the devs decided it's time for a change.

They announced that the next major release of AV Linux will be based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" (currently developed under the Debian Testing umbrella), and that it will drop support for 32-bit installations. However, most probably current 32-bit installations will still be supported.

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New Raspbian Brings Performance Improvements, Updated Packages To Raspberry Pi

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Debian

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has released a new version of Raspbian, its Debian-based operating system for Raspberry Pi devices.

Raspbian 2019-04-08 is the new release that remains based on Debian Stretch but with a number of changes on top. This is the first official update to Raspbian since last November and has upgraded to Chromium 72 and the VLC 3.0.6 media player along with a number of other updated packages.

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HP Linux Imaging & Printing Drivers Now Support Linux Mint 19.1 and Debian 9.7

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Linux
Debian

More than two months in development, the HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.19.3 software and drivers are here implement support for a bunch of new HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro All-in-One 9010, HP OfficeJet Pro All-in-One 9020, HP OfficeJet All-in-One 9010, HP PageWide XL 4100 and 4600 printers, HP PageWide XL 4100 and 4600PS MFP, as well as HP Color LaserJet Managed MFP E77422a, E77422dv, E77422dn, and E77428dn.

Additionally, it now supports the HP LaserJet MFP E72425a, E72425dv, E72425dn, and E72430dn, HP LaserJet Managed MFP E62655dn and E62665hs, HP LaserJet Managed Flow MFP E62665h, E62675z, and E62665z, HP LaserJet Managed E60155dn, E60165dn, and E60175dn, HP Color LaserJet Managed E65150dn and E65160dn, as well as HP Color LaserJet Managed MFP E67650dh and HP Color LaserJet Managed Flow MFP E67660z printers.

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Debian, Event in Kosovo and ApacheCon

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OSS
Debian
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Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2
    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release. Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.
  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN
    To all X.Org Foundation Members: The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms. There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/ The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting. Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote: Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/ If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org. When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference. For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates. After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button. After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast. Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members. Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee
  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections
    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections. At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

today's howtos

Games: Lutris and More

  • Epic Games Store Now On Linux Thanks To Lutris
    While the Epic Games Store itself is not officially supported by the open source Linux operating system, a third-party gaming client has now made sure that you can access the store and launcher on your own distro. The Epic Games Store is now accessible on Linux via the Lutris Gaming client. The client is available to all Linux users, who in the past has provided the same users a way to play PC games without the need to have Windows installed in their machines. Although Linux is not necessarily the go-to platform when it comes to PC gaming, there is a very niche audience dedicated to making the platform work in favor of open-source and to counteract what could be perceived as a heavily Windows-biased PC gaming community. Linux gaming is somewhat tedious to the relatively casual or normal user, although there are some within the Linux community that advertise and try to foster its growth in terms of gaming, as there are some games that can run better on the operating system. That is to say, if you have a lot of patience to try and make it work.
  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you is good fun in a small package
    Sometimes, simplicity is what makes a game and in the case of You Died BaNRY that's very true. The game has little depth to it but makes up for that in just how frantic and fun it can be. The entire gameplay is just you (or you and friends) attempting to cross a small level filled with platforms, spikes and all sorts of crazy traps. It's ridiculously easy to get into as well, since the controls are so basic all you need to worry about is your movement.
  • Forager is a weirdly addictive casual grinding game that has mined into my heart
    I'm not usually one for games that have you endlessly wander around, collect resources, build a little and repeat but Forager is so ridiculously charming it's lovely.
  • DragonRuby Game Toolkit, a cross-platform way to make games with Ruby
    Now for something a little different! Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, a name known for many Linux ports and SDL2 teamed up with indie developer Amir Rajan to create a new cross-platform toolkit. Why was it created? Well, in a nutshell they both "hate the complexity of today's engines" and this toolkit was actually made to help ship A Dark Room for the Nintendo Switch, which shows how versatile it is.

10+ Open Source Software Writing Tools That Every Writer Should Know

Being a professional writer requires two key things to help ensure success: commitment and support. The former comes from the writer, and the latter comes from the tools he (or she) uses to get the job done. Below is a list of 11 great and lesser-known writing tools or apps, many of which are free and open-source, that can help improve the quality of your writing and make you a more productive and successful writer. Read more