Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Advertisement

Linux Foundation and the US Military

Filed under
Advertisement
OSS
  • Darpa, Linux Foundation create open software initiative to accelerate US 5G stack

    The Linux Foundation said it entered a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) to create open source software. Darpa and the LF will create a broad collaboration umbrella that allows US government projects, their ecosystem and the open-source community to participate in accelerating innovation and security in the areas of 5G, edge, AI, standards, programmability and IoT, among other technologies.

  • Linux Foundation, DARPA collaborate on open source for 5G | FierceWireless

    The Linux Foundation has signed an agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to establish an open source project for the U.S. government.

    The agreement calls for the Linux Foundation and DARPA to work together in the areas of 5G, edge, artificial intelligence, standards, programmability and IoT, among other technologies.

  • DARPA, Linux Foundation Partner to Advance 5G - Nextgov

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is partnering with a major technology consortium to establish an open-source software development collaboration ecosystem to advance emerging technologies such as 5G, according to a Wednesday press release.

    The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization that hosts open-source efforts including Kubernetes and the O-RAN Alliance’s software community, signed a cooperative research and development agreement, or CRADA, with DARPA to create a “broad collaboration umbrella” called US Government Open Programmable and Secure, or US GOV OPS. DARPA’s Open Programmable Secure 5G, or OPS-5G, effort will be the first project included under the umbrella, according to the release.

  • DARPA, Linux Foundation team for government 5G | Light Reading

    The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it has signed a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to create open source software that accelerates United States government technology research and development innovation.

    Under the agreement, DARPA and the LF will create a broad collaboration umbrella (US Government Open Programmable Secure (US GOV OPS) that allows United States Government projects, their ecosystem, and open community to participate in accelerating innovation and security in the areas of 5G, Edge, AI, Standards, Programmability, and IOT among other technologies. The project formation encourages ecosystem players to support US Government initiatives to create the latest in technology software.

Python Programming

Filed under
Advertisement
  • Which is better, Java or Python? And how?

    Blogs over the internet that are showcasing the comparison between Python and Java. But no one is giving a solid reason for “is python or java easier.” We all know that nowadays Python is competing with almost every programming language.

    Even it is also competing with the most robust programming language in the world. Yes, you are right, it is Java. Java is one of the best programming languages to create desktop applications. But it is also used in the field of data science. Therefore both of these programming languages are competing with each other in various industries. Before we dig into the comparison, let’s have a look at the overview of both of these languages.

  • Async Views in Django 3.1

    Writing asynchronous code gives you the ability to speed up your application with little effort. With Django 3.1 finally supporting async views, middleware, and tests, now's a great time to get them under your belt.

    This post looks at how to get started with Django's new asynchronous views.

  • PyBites: How to Run External Python Libraries in AWS Cloud

    AWS Lambda is awesome, but sometimes it can be hard to get external libraries working in this serverless environment.

    No worries, we learned a lesson or two which I will share in this article.

  • Taking Another Look at Plotly

    I’ve written quite a bit about visualization in python - partially because the landscape is always evolving. Plotly stands out as one of the tools that has undergone a significant amount of change since my first post in 2015. If you have not looked at using Plotly for python data visualization lately, you might want to take it for a spin. This article will discuss some of the most recent changes with Plotly, what the benefits are and why Plotly is worth considering for your data visualization needs.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 11 : Wrapping up!
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC: Week 12: Scanning docker
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Blog #6 (9th Aug - 16th Aug)

Can You Use FreeBSD for a Developer Machine in 2020?

Filed under
Advertisement
BSD

I’ve been considering moving my blog back to a FreeBSD web server. I’d hosted it that way for years and recently switched it to a Linux machine so I could make Octopress work properly. It uses some old, outdated Ruby gems, and it just seemed easier.

But with a new redesign coming and a new Hugo back-end, I’ll be bringing my hosting machine back to FreeBSD.

I recently read FreeBSD is an amazing operating system, which got me thinking:

Can FreeBSD be a viable desktop operating system for developers in 2020?

Read more

Programming/Development: Minicoin, GNU Gengetop and Python

Filed under
Advertisement
  • Building and testing on multiple platforms – introducing minicoin

    While working with large-scale (thousands of hosts), distributed (globally) systems, one of my favourite, albeit somewhat gruesome, metaphors was that of “servers as cattle” vs “servers as pets”. Pet-servers are those we groom manually, we keep them alive, and we give them nice names by which to remember and call (ie ssh into) them. However, once you are dealing with hundreds of machines, manually managing their configuration is no longer an option. And once you have thousands of machines, something will break all the time, and you need to be able to provision new machines quickly, and automatically, without having to manually follow a list of complicated instructions.

    When working with such systems, we use configuration management systems such as CFEngine, Chef, Puppet, or Ansible, to automate the provisioning and configuration of machines. When working in the cloud, the entire machine definition becomes “infrastructure as code”. With these tools, servers become cattle which – so the rather unvegetarian idea – is simply “taken behind the barn and shot” when it doesn’t behave like it should. We can simply bring a new machine, or an entire environment, up by running the code that defines it. We can use the same code to bring production, development, and testing environments up, and we can look at the code to see exactly what the differences between those environments are. The tooling in this space is fairly complex, but even so there is little focus on developers writing native code targeting multiple platforms.

    For us as developers, the machine we write our code on is most likely a pet. Our primary workstation dying is the stuff for nightmares, and setting up a new machine will probably keep us busy for many days. But this amount of love and care is perhaps not required for those machines that we only need for checking whether our code builds and runs correctly. We don’t need our test machines to be around for a long time, and we want to know exactly how they are set up so that we can compare things. Applying the concepts from cloud computing and systems engineering to this problem lead me (back) to Vagrant, which is a popular tool to manage virtual machines locally and to share development environments.

  • GNU Gengetopt - News: 2.23 released

    New version (2.23) was released. Main changes were in build system, so please report any issues you notice.

  • Abolishing SyntaxError: invalid syntax ...

    Do you remember when you first started programming (possibly with Python) and encountered an error message that completely baffled you? For some reason, perhaps because you were required to complete a formal course or because you were naturally persistent, you didn't let such messages discourage you entirely and you persevered. And now, whenever you see such cryptic error messages, you can almost immediately decipher them and figure out what causes them and fix the problem.

  • Sending email with EZGmail and Python
  • Creating and Importing Modules in Python

Programming/Development: GNU Releases, Bash, Python and JavaScript

Filed under
Advertisement
GNU

Programming: VIM, Python, Knative, Glibc and GCC

Filed under
Advertisement

Learn Linux Kernel Device Drivers With Linux Foundation Instructor Bill Kerr

Filed under
Advertisement
Linux

Bill Kerr has taught Linux Foundation courses in Linux Kernel internals, debugging, device drivers and application development for many years. He helped write the original Linux Foundation Training course materials and has been working with UNIX kernels for 35 years.

Read more

8 Ways to Write a Better Linux SysAdmin Job Posting

Filed under
Advertisement
GNU
Linux

Linux system administrators are in high demand these days and many hiring managers say they're having a hard time finding talent to fill their open positions. It's critical, then, for companies seeking skilled admins to hone their recruiting process in order to stay competitive – and this starts with writing an effective job posting.

Unfortunately, many companies aren't hitting the mark. Job postings for sysadmin positions are largely similar; they’re boring and generic, according to New York City-based recruiter Steve Levy.

Read more

Sourceforge Hijacks the Nmap Sourceforge Account

Filed under
Advertisement
Development

Hi Folks! You may have already read the recent news about Sourceforge.net
hijacking the GIMP project account to distribute adware/malware.
Previously GIMP used this Sourceforge account to distribute their Windows
installer, but they quit after Sourceforge started tricking users with fake
download buttons which lead to malware rather than GIMP. Then Sourceforge
took over GIMP's account and began distributing a trojan installer which
tries to trick users into installing various malware and adware before
actually installing GIMP.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Best Linux laptop for 2021: Which one should you buy?

I remember, back in my early days of Linux, finding a laptop that could run the open-source operating system was tricky business. You might get a distribution to work with the video chipset. You might even find one that interacts with your soundcard. If you could manage to get wireless working, you were something special. That was then, and this is a very different time. Now, you can find Linux pre-installed laptops all over the place. Companies like System76, Tuxedo Computers, Juno Computers, Dell, Lenovo and HP are all producing laptops that support or are even fully certified to run Linux. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Paradox of the perfect code editor

    Imagine if someone summoned a magical genie and wished for a perfect code editor. Since it is perfect, does that mean it provides you everything you ever need to code the optimal solution? Or since it is perfect, does it enable you to accomplish the coding aspect instantly?

    Thus, the paradox:

    Does the perfect code editor mean that you spend nearly 100% of your work time using the editor or does it mean you spend nearly 0% of your work time using the editor?

  • I write code 100 hours/week, here's why I probably won't stop

    I feel strongly you should never feel compelled or required to do what I am doing. Any company, manager, or person asking you to do so is horrible and you should get out quick. I don’t want to contribute to that culture or feed it.

    But-I love what I’m doing. I love the amount of progress I’m able to achieve every day. I love my time spent solving problems. I love what I’ve achieved so far. I want to go further than ever before - I’ve been marathon coding for as long as I can remember, and I’m not going to stop. I need to see how far I can go.

    I love the choices I’ve made in life. I hope you love yours too.

  • The reports of Perl’s death have been greatly exaggerated

    But you know what? Perl’s still going. It’s had a steady cadence of year­ly releas­es for the past decade, intro­duc­ing new fea­tures and fenc­ing in bad behav­ior while main­tain­ing an admirable lev­el of back­ward com­pat­i­bil­i­ty. Yes, there was a too-​long adven­ture devel­op­ing what start­ed as Perl 6, but that lan­guage now has its own iden­ti­ty as Raku and even has facil­i­ties for mix­ing Perl with its native code or vice versa.

  • Share with us your say on interoperability benefits in digital public service delivery

    As the the ISA2 programme and ELISE are coming to an end, is the right time to reflect on what we have achieved together and how to build on that in the next generation programmes.

  • How BSD Authentication Works

    The way OpenBSD authenticates users is quite different from other Unix-like operating systems. Most other systems like AIX, Solaris, Linux, the other BSDs, and MacOS, use a framework called Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM). The two main implementations are Linux PAM and OpenPAM. PAM modules are created as dynamically loaded shared objects, which communicate using a combination of common and implementation specific interfaces (Linux-PAM and OpenPAM). It's configured using the pam.d directory and pam.conf file. While it can be flexible, it's highly complex and very easy to mis-configure, leaving you open to strange and hard to track down authentication bugs. On top of that, the fact that it's a shared library means that any vulnerability in a poorly vetted authentication module gives attackers direct access to the internals of your application. Author Michael W. Lucas said it best when he described PAM as unstandardized black magic.

    OpenBSD on the other hand uses a mechanism called BSD Authentication. It was originally developed for a now-defunct proprietary operating system called BSD/OS by Berkeley Software Design Inc., who later donated the system. It was then adopted by OpenBSD in release 2.9. BSD Auth is comparatively much simpler than PAM. Modules or, authentication "styles", are instead stand alone applications or scripts that communicate over IPC. The module has no ability to interfere with the parent and can very easily revoke permissions using pledge(2) or unveil(2). The BSD Authentication system of configured through login.conf(5).

  • Explaining top(1) on FreeBSD

    We all know and have at least once used the top(1) command to track information about our cpu and processes, but how many of you know what each field means? Today we will guide you through each of these fields. By default, top(1) displays the ‘top’ processes on each system and periodically updates this information every 2.0 seconds using the raw cpu use percentage to rank the processes in the list.

Integrity/Availability, Security, and DRM

  • Sinclair hit by ransomware attack, TV stations disrupted [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Sinclair Broadcast Group, which operates dozens of TV stations across the U.S., said Monday that some of its servers and work stations were encrypted with ransomware and that data was stolen from its network.

  • Sinclair hit by ransomware attack, TV stations disrupted [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The Hunt Valley, Maryland-based company either owns or operates 21 regional sports network and owns, operates or provides services to 185 television stations in 86 markets.

  • Canon Sued For Disabling Printer Scanners When Devices Run Out Of Ink

    For more than a decade now, computer printer manufacturers have been engaged in an endless quest called: "let's be as annoying as humanly possible." That quest, driven by a desire to monopolize and boost the sale of their own printer cartridges, has resulted in all manner of obnoxious DRM and other restrictions designed to make using cheaper, third-party printing cartridges a monumental headache. Often, software or firmware updates have been designed to intentionally grind printing to a halt if you try to use these alternative options.

  • Caskading Failures

    In case you hadn’t heard, Let’s Encrypt’s root certificate expired on September 30th, causing many old applications and devices to reject connections to any site secured by certificates issued by Let’s Encrypt. At Cider and Saddle, all of our services are backed by a Let’s Encrypt wildcard certificate, which we’d configured to automatically renew when needed. We thought that meant we’d be in the clear; after all, we were sure to keep our production system up-to-date, and as long as the system’s CA certificates were fresh, there shouldn’t be any issues.

    We were wrong.

    On October 3rd, one of our community members noticed Cask was throwing 500 errors upon visiting the page. Scrubbing through the logs, it was pretty easy to guess what was going on: [...]