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Linux Foundation and the US Military

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OSS
  • Darpa, Linux Foundation create open software initiative to accelerate US 5G stack

    The Linux Foundation said it entered a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) to create open source software. Darpa and the LF will create a broad collaboration umbrella that allows US government projects, their ecosystem and the open-source community to participate in accelerating innovation and security in the areas of 5G, edge, AI, standards, programmability and IoT, among other technologies.

  • Linux Foundation, DARPA collaborate on open source for 5G | FierceWireless

    The Linux Foundation has signed an agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to establish an open source project for the U.S. government.

    The agreement calls for the Linux Foundation and DARPA to work together in the areas of 5G, edge, artificial intelligence, standards, programmability and IoT, among other technologies.

  • DARPA, Linux Foundation Partner to Advance 5G - Nextgov

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is partnering with a major technology consortium to establish an open-source software development collaboration ecosystem to advance emerging technologies such as 5G, according to a Wednesday press release.

    The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization that hosts open-source efforts including Kubernetes and the O-RAN Alliance’s software community, signed a cooperative research and development agreement, or CRADA, with DARPA to create a “broad collaboration umbrella” called US Government Open Programmable and Secure, or US GOV OPS. DARPA’s Open Programmable Secure 5G, or OPS-5G, effort will be the first project included under the umbrella, according to the release.

  • DARPA, Linux Foundation team for government 5G | Light Reading

    The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it has signed a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to create open source software that accelerates United States government technology research and development innovation.

    Under the agreement, DARPA and the LF will create a broad collaboration umbrella (US Government Open Programmable Secure (US GOV OPS) that allows United States Government projects, their ecosystem, and open community to participate in accelerating innovation and security in the areas of 5G, Edge, AI, Standards, Programmability, and IOT among other technologies. The project formation encourages ecosystem players to support US Government initiatives to create the latest in technology software.

Python Programming

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  • Which is better, Java or Python? And how?

    Blogs over the internet that are showcasing the comparison between Python and Java. But no one is giving a solid reason for “is python or java easier.” We all know that nowadays Python is competing with almost every programming language.

    Even it is also competing with the most robust programming language in the world. Yes, you are right, it is Java. Java is one of the best programming languages to create desktop applications. But it is also used in the field of data science. Therefore both of these programming languages are competing with each other in various industries. Before we dig into the comparison, let’s have a look at the overview of both of these languages.

  • Async Views in Django 3.1

    Writing asynchronous code gives you the ability to speed up your application with little effort. With Django 3.1 finally supporting async views, middleware, and tests, now's a great time to get them under your belt.

    This post looks at how to get started with Django's new asynchronous views.

  • PyBites: How to Run External Python Libraries in AWS Cloud

    AWS Lambda is awesome, but sometimes it can be hard to get external libraries working in this serverless environment.

    No worries, we learned a lesson or two which I will share in this article.

  • Taking Another Look at Plotly

    I’ve written quite a bit about visualization in python - partially because the landscape is always evolving. Plotly stands out as one of the tools that has undergone a significant amount of change since my first post in 2015. If you have not looked at using Plotly for python data visualization lately, you might want to take it for a spin. This article will discuss some of the most recent changes with Plotly, what the benefits are and why Plotly is worth considering for your data visualization needs.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 11 : Wrapping up!
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC: Week 12: Scanning docker
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Blog #6 (9th Aug - 16th Aug)

Can You Use FreeBSD for a Developer Machine in 2020?

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BSD

I’ve been considering moving my blog back to a FreeBSD web server. I’d hosted it that way for years and recently switched it to a Linux machine so I could make Octopress work properly. It uses some old, outdated Ruby gems, and it just seemed easier.

But with a new redesign coming and a new Hugo back-end, I’ll be bringing my hosting machine back to FreeBSD.

I recently read FreeBSD is an amazing operating system, which got me thinking:

Can FreeBSD be a viable desktop operating system for developers in 2020?

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Programming/Development: Minicoin, GNU Gengetop and Python

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  • Building and testing on multiple platforms – introducing minicoin

    While working with large-scale (thousands of hosts), distributed (globally) systems, one of my favourite, albeit somewhat gruesome, metaphors was that of “servers as cattle” vs “servers as pets”. Pet-servers are those we groom manually, we keep them alive, and we give them nice names by which to remember and call (ie ssh into) them. However, once you are dealing with hundreds of machines, manually managing their configuration is no longer an option. And once you have thousands of machines, something will break all the time, and you need to be able to provision new machines quickly, and automatically, without having to manually follow a list of complicated instructions.

    When working with such systems, we use configuration management systems such as CFEngine, Chef, Puppet, or Ansible, to automate the provisioning and configuration of machines. When working in the cloud, the entire machine definition becomes “infrastructure as code”. With these tools, servers become cattle which – so the rather unvegetarian idea – is simply “taken behind the barn and shot” when it doesn’t behave like it should. We can simply bring a new machine, or an entire environment, up by running the code that defines it. We can use the same code to bring production, development, and testing environments up, and we can look at the code to see exactly what the differences between those environments are. The tooling in this space is fairly complex, but even so there is little focus on developers writing native code targeting multiple platforms.

    For us as developers, the machine we write our code on is most likely a pet. Our primary workstation dying is the stuff for nightmares, and setting up a new machine will probably keep us busy for many days. But this amount of love and care is perhaps not required for those machines that we only need for checking whether our code builds and runs correctly. We don’t need our test machines to be around for a long time, and we want to know exactly how they are set up so that we can compare things. Applying the concepts from cloud computing and systems engineering to this problem lead me (back) to Vagrant, which is a popular tool to manage virtual machines locally and to share development environments.

  • GNU Gengetopt - News: 2.23 released

    New version (2.23) was released. Main changes were in build system, so please report any issues you notice.

  • Abolishing SyntaxError: invalid syntax ...

    Do you remember when you first started programming (possibly with Python) and encountered an error message that completely baffled you? For some reason, perhaps because you were required to complete a formal course or because you were naturally persistent, you didn't let such messages discourage you entirely and you persevered. And now, whenever you see such cryptic error messages, you can almost immediately decipher them and figure out what causes them and fix the problem.

  • Sending email with EZGmail and Python
  • Creating and Importing Modules in Python

Programming/Development: GNU Releases, Bash, Python and JavaScript

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GNU

Programming: VIM, Python, Knative, Glibc and GCC

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Learn Linux Kernel Device Drivers With Linux Foundation Instructor Bill Kerr

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Linux

Bill Kerr has taught Linux Foundation courses in Linux Kernel internals, debugging, device drivers and application development for many years. He helped write the original Linux Foundation Training course materials and has been working with UNIX kernels for 35 years.

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8 Ways to Write a Better Linux SysAdmin Job Posting

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GNU
Linux

Linux system administrators are in high demand these days and many hiring managers say they're having a hard time finding talent to fill their open positions. It's critical, then, for companies seeking skilled admins to hone their recruiting process in order to stay competitive – and this starts with writing an effective job posting.

Unfortunately, many companies aren't hitting the mark. Job postings for sysadmin positions are largely similar; they’re boring and generic, according to New York City-based recruiter Steve Levy.

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Sourceforge Hijacks the Nmap Sourceforge Account

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Development

Hi Folks! You may have already read the recent news about Sourceforge.net
hijacking the GIMP project account to distribute adware/malware.
Previously GIMP used this Sourceforge account to distribute their Windows
installer, but they quit after Sourceforge started tricking users with fake
download buttons which lead to malware rather than GIMP. Then Sourceforge
took over GIMP's account and began distributing a trojan installer which
tries to trick users into installing various malware and adware before
actually installing GIMP.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Debian: Raphaël Hertzog (LTS Work), Jonathan Dowland (IkiWiki), and Ben Hutchings (Also LTS)

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, May 2021

    In May, we again put aside 2100 EUR to fund Debian projects. There was no proposals for new projects received, thus we’re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Please do not hesitate to submit a proposal, if there is a project that could benefit from the funding! We’re looking forward to receive more projects from various Debian teams! Learn more about the rationale behind this initiative in this article.

  • Jonathan Dowland: Opinionated IkiWiki v1

    It's been more than a year since I wrote about Opinionated IkiWiki, a pre-configured, containerized deployment of Ikiwiki with opinions. My intention was to make something that is easy to get up and running if you are more experienced with containers than IkiWiki.

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, May 2021

    In May I was assigned 13.5 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 4.5 hours from earlier months. I worked 16 hours and will carry over the remainder. I finished reviewing the futex code in the PREEMPT_RT patchset for Linux 4.9, and identified several places where it had been mis-merged with the recent futex security fixes. I sent a patch for these upstream, which was accepted and applied in v4.9.268-rt180.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Javier Martinez Canillas: The curious case of the ghostly modalias

    I was finishing my morning coffee at the Fedora ARM mystery department when a user report came into my attention: the tpm_tis_spi driver was not working on a board that had a TPM device connected through SPI. There was no /dev/tpm0 character device present in the system, even when the driver was built as a module and the Device Tree (DT) passed to the kernel had a node with a "infineon,slb9670" compatible string.

  • What you need to know about WebSphere Hybrid Edition – IBM Developer

    IBM WebSphere Hybrid Edition is a bundle of IBM runtimes for enterprise and cloud-native Java workloads. WebSphere Hybrid Edition enables developers to flexibly deploy both WebSphere traditional runtimes and Liberty runtimes (including the open-source Open Liberty framework), depending on their needs while optimizing the use of WebSphere Network Deployment, WebSphere Application Server, and Liberty Core license entitlements. WebSphere Application Server traditional is a trusted application server for Java EE applications. Liberty is a fast, lightweight, and modular framework for cloud-native Java applications and microservices that are optimized for cloud and Kubernetes and supporting a wide spectrum of Java APIs, including the latest Eclipse MicroProfile and Jakarta EE API. With WebSphere Hybrid Edition, you can continue to run workloads on WebSphere Application Server traditional reliably, build new services on Liberty and deploy them to cloud, and modernize and refactor your legacy applications whenever you’re ready at your own pace. The choices are yours.

  • Understanding the CentOS 7 filesystem hierarchy - Linux Concept

    We can compare a filesystem to a refrigerator, or any other storage with multiple shelves that is used for storing different items. These shelves or compartments help us to organize grocery items in our refrigerator by certain characteristics, such as shape, size, type, and so on. The same analogy is applicable to a filesystem, which is the epitome of storing and organizing collections of data and files in human-usable form.

  • File encryption and decryption made easy with GPG | Enable Sysadmin

    GPG is a popular Linux encrypting tool. Find out how to use its power to keep private files private.

  • Molly de Blanc: Welcome Red Hat as a GUADEC Sponsor [Ed: IBM ('Red Hat') rewarding, financially, those who attacked Richard Stallman and the FSF with hate and defamation]

    “As one of the many active contributors within the vibrant GNOME community, Red Hat is very pleased to also be among the sponsors of this year’s GUADAC event,” said a representative from Red Hat. “Community is about connections, and as we move into a world that is waking up from decreased social contact, those connections are more important than ever. GNOME remains an incredible part of the open source ecosystem, and the conversations made at GUADEC amongst users and contributors are a big reason why GNOME continues to be successful! We are thrilled to be a part of these conversations and look forward to participating in the GUADEC 2021 online event.” Kristi Progri, lead organizer of GUADEC, says “On behalf of everyone at GUADEC organizing team, I would like to express our sincere gratitude for the generous sponsorship to GUADEC, We’re happy they’re joining us again at GUADEC to help build GNOME and show the community what they are working on.”

  • Red Hat Migration Toolkit for Virtualization Now Available

    Red Hat has announced the general availability of Red Hat’s migration toolkit for virtualization to help organizations accelerate open hybrid cloud strategies by making it easier to migrate existing workloads to modern infrastructure in a streamlined, wholesale manner. By bringing applications based on virtual machines (VMs) to Red Hat OpenShift, IT organizations can experience a smoother, more scalable modernization experience while mitigating potential risks and downtime.

  • Move virtual machines to OpenShift at-scale with Red Hat’s migration toolkit for virtualization

    Red Hat OpenShift, the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform, is used by enterprises across the globe that are looking to bring applications to market faster. The benefits of OpenShift can be extended to virtualized workloads through OpenShift Virtualization, OpenShift’s capability for Kubernetes-native virtualization, but first comes the hard part: How do you actually move your workloads to Kubernetes in the first place?

  • How open source is lowering barriers to higher education

    Stepping into the college experience is a whirlwind. For many people, it’s your first time away from home and one of the first times that you are tasked with managing your life on your own. There are a lot of details you need to figure out. Are you going to live on campus or off? What meal plan do you want to use? What do you want to choose as your major? What classes do you want to take? And likely most pressing, how are you going to afford everything you need? When talking about the cost of education, there is one thing that is an issue for every student: the cost of textbooks. Textbooks for a college course can cost upwards of $100 apiece and, depending on how many courses you are taking in a semester, that can add up very quickly. In fact, the College Board found that the average university student spends more than $1,200 on books each year. For students it can be hard to justify the steep costs of books, especially when it comes to courses outside your field of study.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F34 Final

    Hello fellow testers, welcome to the Fedora Linux 34 Final installation of Heroes of Fedora! In this post, we’ll look at the stats concerning the testing of Fedora Linux 34 Final. The purpose of Heroes of Fedora is to provide a summation of testing activity on each milestone release of Fedora. Without community support, Fedora would not exist, so thank you to all who contributed to this release! Without further ado, let’s get started!

Sovereignty on a Federated System: problems we faced on GNOME’s Matrix instance

This post follows an introduction to Matrix with e-mails, where I explain that Matrix is a federated system. Federation can be either public or private. A public server can communicate with any other server, except the ones which are explicitely avoided. Meanwhile, a private server can only communicate with a selected list of other servers. Private federation is often deployed between entities that can trust each other, for example between universites. There often are processes to take back control of things when they derail on a server you don’t manage, because people on the remote server are contractually bound with you. But many organisations, and especially open source projets, deploy their instance in public federation. This means strangers from the Internet can interact with your server. Public federation comes with its own set of non-technical risks. In this post I’m going to guide you through the problems we faced on our GNOME Matrix instance. For each problem I’ll bring a solution. They will be consolidated at the end of the post in the form of a target we want to reach eventually, along with the acknowledgement of the limits of what we can do. Please note that these problems have more to do with careful planning and deployment than with the Matrix protocol itself. Read more

Security-Oriented Alpine Linux 3.14 Released with KDE Plasma 5.22, QEMU 6.0, and More

Five months in the works, Alpine Linux 3.14 is here as another big update for this security-oriented distribution, featuring the latest and greatest KDE Plasma 5.22 desktop environment series, along with the KDE Gear 21.04.2 software suite, for those who want to install the KDE Plasma desktop. But, Alpine Linux is a Linux distribution designed for servers, firewalls, routers, VPNs, etc., so it comes with major updates for packages needed for these type of setups. These include Lua 5.4.3, HAProxy 2.4.0, nginx 1.20.0, njs 0.5.3, Node.js 14.17.0, PostgreSQL 13.3, Python 3.9.5, QEMU 6.0.0, R 4.1.0, and Zabbix 5.4.1. Read more