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Gadgets

X11 on iOS 13 spotted, getting Linux for iPhone/iPad not Herculean task anymore

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OS
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

Do you think you can replace the whole user interface with Linux or any other platform? I hate to bust your bubble! But, the secondary OS stays inside an app and you get to stream it locally over VNC. The developer says nothing will stop someone from changing that.

Moreover, for those who look forward to getting GNOME, it hasn’t been achieved yet. Despite trying, the person behind all these is facing a troubling bug in fontconfig and/or freetype. And, we will update this story if he comes up with a new progress in this affair.

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New postmarketOS build infrastructure is powered by sourcehut builds

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OS
Android
Gadgets

Development effort from our end went into build.postmarketos.org (in short BPO). This is the name of both the website seen in the second screenshot, as well as the source code for the program that generates the website. Besides that, it manages the jobs that run on sourcehut builds.

BPO has 91% test coverage. A rather unusual design decision is that the website is generated as static HTML page whenever there is a change. It is not generated on demand when requested via HTTP. This seems highly appropriate though, as the content at most changes a few times per second.

We have come a long way from initially having no binary repository and expecting all developers to build everything from source at the project's public launch in May of 2017. During the following months we had an inofficial repository of binary packages for Plasma Mobile packages on postmarketOS at one point. Until we got the first official binary repository at the end of 2017. But that one had to be manually triggered and the build logs where not available online.

Now it's completely automated and transparent, and multiple developers of the core team are able to fix things if they go south. Therefore we allow more people to merge incoming patches, and it is already apparent that this has resulted in increased productivity.

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Librem 5 Longevity: Solving The Problem of Disposable Technology

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

I’ve been using GNU/Linux (“Linux”) as my desktop OS for over twenty years now. Throughout all of that time, one thing that I’ve loved about Linux on the desktop is how it can take a so-called “slow” and “old” computer and can breathe new life into it. Back when Installfests were a thing (events where people would bring computers to Linux Users’ Groups and get help installing Linux on them) often people would bring in second-hand computers, sometimes found in the trash or given away by companies after they were deemed too slow to run Windows. After Linux was installed they performed like they were new and the user now had a computer they could use for years to come. There were even programs that would refurbish second-hand computers, put Linux on them and provide them to schools who wouldn’t have computers otherwise. However bloated some people might think Linux is today compared to the “good old days” this effect still holds true–take a machine that’s too slow to run something else, and put Linux on it, and it’s like a new computer.

Linux’s low resource needs compared to everything else not only meant resurrecting computers that would otherwise end up in a landfill, it also meant if you were fortunate enough that you could afford a new computer, you could expect many more years of service out of the hardware, with OS updates that either improved performance (as hardware support improved) or at least maintained the existing performance. Many large companies assume their computers will last around 2-3 years before they need to be replaced but in my experience I get at least twice that longevity with Linux on the desktop.

My personal laptop is a first generation Librem 13 I bought in 2015 (I participated in the original crowdfunding campaign long before I worked here). I run Qubes on it and even after four years I don’t feel any need for a new laptop yet–it still works as well as it did when I bought it. Before that I had a Thinkpad X200s I bought brand new and had used for about six years before it started to show its age. Even now my wife uses that X200s as a secondary computer for writing.

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PineTime: A Linux Friendly Smartwatch

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Linux
Gadgets

After releasing their successful rounds of notebook computers, laptops, single-board PCs and Linux smartphones, Pine64 is back with another incredible launch. The company is set to bring a smartwatch based on the Linux operating system that focuses solely on the needs of developers.

Pine64: History

Mainly known as Pine Microsystems, Inc., the US origin company sells and manufactures computer hardware and software. After the company’s 1st product, the Pine A64, a single-board computer in 2015, the company went on with the same name after that. Later, it released successors of the Pine family that included notebooks and smartphones for the public.

PineTime Smartwatch

The PineTime project came under attention in September 2019 when the company on their official Twitter account announced it. The news came right after Pine64 made the existence of its PinePhone public. In the coming year, with the success of the Librem 5 smartphone and PinePhone soon to hit the markets, it is a perfect time to introduce a companion device that goes along with other Linux devices.

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Nordic Semi nRF52832 Powered PineTime Dev Kit is Now Available for $24.99

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

PineTime was announced as a $25 smartwatch & companion for PinePhone Linux smartphone which itself sells for $150.

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Librem Boot Freedom and Purism Closes $2.5m Note Series

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Gadgets
  • coreboot 4.11: Leaving No Librem Behind

    One of Purism’s core beliefs is to ensure that to the best of our ability, all new features, fixes, and improvements will be applied to all products, past and present.

  • Purism Closes $2.5m Note Series

    Purism as a Social Purpose Company (SPC) ensures the rights of humanity by creating products that fully respect people, and that mission has garnered a lot of attention and growth. One of the reasons Purism registered as an SPC was so that we could accept inbound investment without the risk that a toxic investor could force us to violate our values for profit (a common problem in C corporations). As a social purpose company Purism enshrines in its articles of incorporation that we must do what is good for society, therefore avoiding any and all toxic funding by virtue of the strictness of those articles.

    Funding growth—in addition to the triple-digit (yes that is over doubling) shipped revenue growth year-over-year since 2014 that Purism has been fortunate to see—can come in many forms, be that inventory financing, lines of credit, investment, and equity financing, to name a few.

Here’s An Early Look at the PinePhone Developer Edition (Video)

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GNU
Linux
Gadgets

If you have pre-ordered the PinePhone Brave Heart edition or are waiting for it to go on general sale early next year then the following video is a must watch.

In it, Pine64’s Lukasz Erecinski shows off his PinePhone developer edition, showing us the fit, form and build quality, and giving us a glimpse at what lays behind the back case, including some very tantalising pogo pins…

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Also: [Librem 5] A Different Kind of Transparency

And in French: [Eelo/e/] Gaël Duval, l’adepte de Linux qui veut libérer les smartphones

PinePhone: Everything you need to know about the $150 Linux-powered phone

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Gadgets

It’s no secret that two operating systems hold the lion’s share of the mobile market — Android and iOS. This current duopoly doesn’t give users much choice in the way of OS offerings, even though there is no shortage of hardware. In the past, Microsoft tried to break into the market to no avail, and Huawei will release its own offering soon enough.

But what if there was another alternative, one that’s more privacy-respecting and encourages tinkering? Enter the PinePhone by Pine64. This device isn’t quite ready for the mass market yet, but if you are looking for a unique alternative to Android and iOS devices, you’ll want to keep an eye on this one.

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UBports' Ubuntu Touch Porting Now Easier To Newer Devices

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Ubuntu
Gadgets

Libhybris is the software project that makes it easier for conventional Linux distributions relying upon Glibc or Musl to access drivers/software built for Android (Bionic C library) software. Ubuntu Touch had been using libhybris for years going back to Canonical's original Ubuntu Touch efforts, but was focused on 32-bit ARM until now and thus not working with 64-bit Android drivers. Landing of the 64-bit ARM version of libhybris should help in being able to run newer 64-bit bits on modern Android devices.

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Also: Ubuntu Touch Q&A 63

webOS Open Source Edition 2.1 Released For Continuing The Palm/HP/LG Linux Distro

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OS
Linux
Gadgets

Released at the end of October to little fanfare was webOS Open Source Edition 2.0, the open-source Linux OS currently in development by LG for use on their Smart TVs and other digital products. With webOS Open Source Edition 2.0, they began setting their sights on automobiles and other potential use-cases. That was then extended by this week's release of webOS OSE 2.1.

WebOS Open Source Edition is the open-source spin of this Linux OS that has been controlled by LG Electronics now for the past number of years. This is the operating system formerly developed at Palm a decade ago already before being acquired by HP. The initial webOS Open-Source Edition came last year while this second installment arrived at the end of October.

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Direct: webOS OSE 2.1.0 Release

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Android Leftovers

Arm Officially Supports Panfrost Open-Source Mali GPU Driver Development

Most GPU drivers found in Arm processors are known to be closed-source making it difficult and time-consuming to fix some of the bugs since everybody needs to rely on the silicon vendor to fix those for them, and they may even decide a particular bug is not important to them, so you’d be out of luck. So the developer community has long tried to reverse-engineer GPU drivers with projects like Freedreno (Qualcomm Adreno), Etnaviv (Vivante), as well as Lima and Panfrost for Arm Mali GPUs. Several years ago, Arm management was not interested at all collaborating with open-source GPU driver development for Mali GPUs, but as noted by Phoronix, Alyssa Rosenzweig, a graphics software engineer employed by Collabora, explained Panfrost development was now done in partnership with Arm during a talk at the annual X.Org Developers’ Conference (XDC 2020). Read more

Open Up: Open Source Hardware — A Chat with Carl

From a broader lens, to produce “open source hardware” means that we have developed and shared the recipe to create a high-end commercial product that can be learned from, adapted, and used by anyone else. In the same way we’ve stood on the shoulders of the Linux and open source software giants who came before us, we now get to be pioneers in developing open source hardware for those who come next. If you want to learn more how a computer is designed or how something is made, our schematics are the instructions for how to do it. It describes every step of the process, from each piece of the machine and its dimensions, to the type of aluminum used and how to bend it. It’s similar to open source software in that you can learn from the product, adapt it to your needs, and distribute it. The difference is that it requires outside equipment to produce your own version. Open hardware has become more accessible with 3-D printing, but as we found when we were making acrylic prototypes of Thelio, you reach a point where it’s time to work with metal, which presents its own challenges. You have to cut it, bend it, and paint it, all of which requires specific equipment. Read more

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