Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gadgets

Two Linux tablet projects take a step forward

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

pcworld.com: Between the tiny PC phenomenon and the growing number of PCs shipping with Linux preloaded over the past year, there's been no shortage of hardware announcements for Linux fans.

5 Unique Linux Based Products at CES 2013

Filed under
Gadgets

techdrivein.com: January has come to an end and the highlight of the month was undoubtedly, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) held annually at Las Vegas. Here's a quick roundup of 5 very unique Linux based devices introduced during CES 2013.

$17,000 Linux-powered rifle brings “auto-aim” to the real world

Filed under
Gadgets

arstechnica.com: CES is about technology of all kinds. Austin-based startup TrackingPoint isn't typical Ars fare, but its use of technology to enable getting just the perfect shot was intriguing enough to get me to stop by and take a look at the company's products.

Ubuntu Phone OS Demonstration by Shuttleworth at CES

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

twil.tv: I had the pleasure of meeting Mark Shuttleworth tonight, and this was a quick demonstration he gave me of the Ubuntu Phone OS running on top of a GSM Samsung Galaxy Nexus.

Firefox OS finds a new way to app

Filed under
Gadgets
  • Firefox OS finds a new way to app
  • Firefox OS shows up on a mystery phone, we go hands-on
  • OLPC XO-4 to sell starting at $206, production commencing March
  • Hands-on with the 7-inch XO Tablet, OLPC's first consumer device
  • Before Ubuntu Phone OS: The checkered history of open source phones

Ubuntu Phone Spotted in a Bar, Supposedly

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

softpedia.com: Ubuntu on phones is a bold move from Canonical and they will need a lot of money for the marketing campaign. They can also start by forgetting or taking pictures of their phones in a bar, somewhere.

Designing the new Ubuntu for phone pages

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets
  • Designing the new Ubuntu for phone pages
  • Components Growing
  • And . . . ?

Aakash 3 May Feature SIM Slot, Linux Support

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets
  • Aakash 3 May Feature SIM Slot, Linux Support
  • Samsung And DoCoMo Reportedly Team Up To Offer Tizen Smartphones In 2013

The Linux Tablet is the Future - and always will be

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

theregister.co.uk: The year of the Linux tablet is, like the year of the Linux desktop, destined never to arrive. That doesn't mean we won't see Linux on a tablet, but you'll see Linux on a tablet the way you see it on the desktop - clinging to a tiny percentage of the market.

Open Source Notebook Novena Gets First Motherboard

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets
  • Open Source Notebook Novena Gets First Motherboard
  • Turning a Raspberry Pi into a tiny Linux notebook
  • KDE's Plama Active Running On Nexus 7
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

This week in KDE: building up to something big

We’ve got some really big things planned and in progress for Plasma 5.18 and Frameworks, and work proceeds smoothly. None of it is quite done yet, but we did land a number of nice bugfixes and user interface polish for issues that have been irritating people for years…and mere days! Read more

GNOME in Review and Outreachy in GNOME

  • Ten Years Past GNOME's 10x10 Goal, The Linux Desktop Is Still Far From Having A 10% Marketshare [Ed: The desktop itself is on the decline and they're not counting Chromebooks (or misuse the brand "Linux")]

    That very ambitious 10x10 goal is still documented on the GNOME Wiki and is about "10% of the global desktop market." Perhaps in some very select geographic regions, the Linux desktop marketshare may be close to 10%, but on any large scale that goal is still a pipe-dream. [...] In any case, GNOME has advanced a lot over the past decade and particularly the past 2~3 years since Canonical switched back to GNOME Shell by default and has helped in addressing many bugs -- including several high profile performance issues. GNOME 3.34 is a hell of a lot better than the state of GNOME 3.0 from at the start of this decade. In reliving GNOME's highlights from the past decade, here is a look at the twenty most viewed GNOME stories since 2010.

  • Outreachy week-2 progress report!

    It was a really productive week. I am almost done with the current tasks. I’ve finished replicating the wire-frame of gnome-builder’s search-and-replace-bar widget into the libdazzle-example application. There are a couple (or maybe a couple more) of final nitpicks to do to actually mark these as finished. At the moment, I am far more comfortable with the project. Nothing seems really alien-sih now, rather most of the stuffs (from the project) looks quite familier (and imparts somewhat proper sense).

D9VK 0.40

  • D9VK, the Direct3D9 to Vulkan layer has a huge new 0.40 'Croakacola' release out

    For use with Wine and Steam Play Proton, D9VK is the awesome project based on DXVK which translates Direct3D9 to Vulkan for better performance. A big new release just went out. Codenamed Croakacola, D9VK 0.40 is a big one. D9VK can now use more than 4GB VRAM on 32-bit applications/games, with it being noted to help modded Skyrim/Oblivion and obviously more too. There's also now async presentation across all vendors, some "query flushing" improvements, performance fixes for Risen and Legend of the Heroes: Trails of the Sky, bloom rendering fixes for SpinTyres/Mudrunner and other misc updates.

  • D9VK 0.40 Uses Async Present On All Drivers, Various Other Features + Perf Optimizations

    D9VK 0.40 is out today as the latest feature update to this Direct3D 9 over Vulkan translation layer based on DXVK. D9VK lead developer Joshua Ashton released version 0.40 today as the "Croakacola" release and it includes some big features like for 32-bit applications to be able to utilize more than 4GB of video RAM, which should help Skyrim, Oblivion, and other games.

Graphics: Mesa 20.0 Development, Mir Work and Radeon's Linux Limits

  • Mesa 20.0-devel Intel Gallium3D Performance Benchmarks Are Looking Good For Ice Lake

    While the Mesa 20.0 cycle is quite young and still over one month to go until the feature freeze for this next quarterly installment of these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan Linux drivers, it's quite exciting already with the changes building up. In particular, on the Intel side they are still positioning for the Intel Gallium3D driver to become the new default on hardware of generations Broadwell and newer. Here is a quick look at how the Intel Gallium3D performance is looking compared to their legacy "i965" classic OpenGL driver that is the current default. As you should already know if you've been reading Phoronix for any real length of time, the new Intel Gallium3D driver is quite competitive and for supported generations is generally now ahead of their classic OpenGL driver. The Intel Gallium3D driver supports OpenGL 4.6 like the i965 driver and the lingering bugs are just being addressed before turning it on as the default Intel OpenGL Linux driver while i965 will be sticking around as the default for Haswell and older.

  • Ubuntu's Mir Display Stack Accomplished A Lot In 2019 For Being Discounted Two Years Ago

    Canonical's Alan Griffiths continues leading the Mir efforts and his team had a very busy 2019 continuing to push along Mir even though it's not featured on the Ubuntu desktop right now is still playing a big role at the company due to IoT use-cases like digital signage. Griffiths provided a look back at Mir in 2019 on Ubuntu Discourse. Here were some of the highlights:

  • AMD releases the Radeon 5500XT

    Now step forward almost six months and the drivers for the 5700 and 5500 lines still don’t exist. OK sure there are drivers for Ubuntu 18.04.03, and ONLY for Ubuntu 18.04.03, nothing newer.