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“deGoogled” /e/-Fairphone 3 now available!

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Gadgets

  • “deGoogled” /e/-Fairphone 3 now available!

    Thanks to a partnership with Fairphone we have been able to port /e/OS to the Fairphone 3, and that we can now sell /e/-Fairphone 3 in the EU!

    The deGoogled OS on the ethical smarpthone!

  • /e/OS Fairphone 3

    The deGoogled Fairphone 3 is most likely the first privacy conscious and sustainable phone. It combines a phone that cares for people and planet and an OS and apps that care for your privacy.

    It features a removable 3000 mAh rechargeable battery. And in case of an accident, with its replaceable modules, you can repair it your self with a single screwdriver.

    If you care about fairer technology, it is an obvious choice.

Devices: Purism, Allwinner, Rockchip

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets
  • The smartphone with convenience and control

    I often hear people saying that they have nothing to hide, and I usually reply that it is not about what you want to hide, it is about what you want to protect – your family’s privacy. Modern smartphones are convenience, always on and connected, but they come with a large attack surface to be exploited by hackers or even spying companies.

    [...]

    Purism believes building the Librem 5 is just one step on the road to launching a digital rights movement, where we—the-people stand up for our digital rights, where we place the control of your data and your family’s data back where it belongs: in your own hands.

  • Allwinner V831 AI Full HD Camera SoC Powers Sochip V831 Development Board

    In the last year or so, we’ve started to see several camera SoCs with a built-in NPU or SIMD instructions to accelerate face detection, objects detection and so on, starting with the low-resolution Kendryte K210 processor to the 2.5K Ingenic T31 MIPS video processor, or even the 4K capable iCatch V37 camera SoC.

  • Rockchip RK3588 8K TV Box Triples as 5G & WiFi 6 Router, Home Automation Gateway

    Rockchip RK3588 octa-core Cortex-A76/A55 processor was only expected in the second half of 2020 for IoT and vision/AI applications, but at least one company is working on a 3-in-1 product based on Rockchip high-end processor with a “5G AIoT 8K TV box” that also works as a 5G and WiFi 6, and with features such as Zigbee can also act as a home automation gateway.

    [...]

    The thing is supposed to run Android 9.0 operating system, but it’s a little odd that Rockchip does not work on an Android 10 for an upcoming processor.

New GNOME Mobile Shell Mockups Tease a Tactile Future on Tablets

Filed under
GNOME
Gadgets

With Phosh, the mobile face of GNOME Shell, taking shape on phones it’s not a major leap to start thinking about how the GNOME user experience might function on larger screen sizes.

Like, say a tablet.

Despite some folks thinking that GNOME Shell is a touch-focused UI, it isn’t.

In fact, it’s pretty tedious to use without a keyboard or a mouse. Same was true of Unity, RIP.

To succeed in a finger-driven environment you need a finger-driven interface.

Just like the one on show in “very experimental” concept images recently shared by GNOME designer Tobias Bernard on the GNOME design Gitlab.

Tobias is lead UI/UX designer at Purism and works directly on Phosh.

Read more

Also in GNOME today: Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Timelines on Calendar

How to Enable Volume and Power Control in Amazon Fire TV Stick

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Gadgets

This quick guide helps you to enable the power and volume button in Amazon’s Fire TV Stick remote.
Read more

Librem 5 review: The Linux-based smartphone is not close to consumer ready

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OS
Gadgets

What do you do when you're sent a device for review that is clearly not ready for public consumption--or even ready for review? That's a tough question to answer, but it's one I will attempt to do in the following paragraph in my review of the Purism Librem 5 Linux-based smartphone.

This is one of the smartphones I've been anticipating for quite some time and, based on the product updates, I assumed the Librem 5 would be something mind-blowingly special.

My mind was blown. Unfortunately, not in the good way.

You must go into this, as I did, knowing that the reviewed product is in early beta.

Read more

AirView Wireless Touchscreen Display Works with Phones, Laptops, Raspberry Pi, Etc. (Crowdfunding)

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

We’ve already written about several displays that take USB-C, HDMI or/and WiFi inputs to add a monitor to phones or computers including DUO add-on display and LAPSCREEN.

AirView is another one of those and has launched on Kickstarter with a 13.3″ and 15.6″ Full HD versions featuring a touchscreen, built-in Miracast & AirPlay support, as well as HDMI and USB-C ports. It works with Android/iOS phones, traditional laptops & computers, SBC’s such as Raspberry Pi, and even game consoles.

Read more

Librem 5 Updates and Interviews

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Interviews
Gadgets
  • Librem 5 December 2019 Software Update

    Although we’re well into 2020, the changelog-style software progress reports for the turn of the year have yet to be published. Let’s fix that by giving a brief update of what happened in December.

    Some of the activities below were already mentioned in their own articles in Purism’s news archive; others will be covered in more depth in future articles. This is just a taste of all the work that goes into making the Librem 5 software stack. You can follow development more closely at source.puri.sm.

  • An Interview with fphemeral: Community Member & Librem 5 Early Adopter

    I recently had the pleasure of chatting with fphemeral, a longtime Purism community member, Librem 13 user and Librem 5 early-adopter. What stood out about fphemeral’s story was how big of role community and the the flexibility of our products played on his journey to improved privacy. Like many of our passionate community members, fphemeral is also developing a range of useful apps for his Librem 5 and sharing them with the community. Here’s the full conversation we recently had on Librem Chat.

'Open-source' Rotary Cellphone

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets

  • You can now own a mobile phone with a rotary dial — if that’s really something you want

    While some would be quite literally lost without theirs, smartphones that give us access to a world of information in our pocket but constantly ask to be pulled out of there and stared at have become so complicated many people now find them annoying.
    This has triggered the rise of “dumbphones”, which look like the mobile phones of the past while still having some modern technologies.
    These devices range from the quite cheap to the weirdly expensive.
    Some customers opt for these phones to disconnect from the always online world – while others merely want to be seen to be doing so.
    But if you’re looking for the ultimate disconnected phone, one tinkerer has the perfect device.
    Justine Haupt is an associate scientist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York.
    She’s also the creator of the open source Rotary Cellphone, a mobile phone with a tactile spinning dial like the kind that was common on house phones until around the 1980s.

  • Rotary Cellphone
  • Open-source rotary cellphone

    Justine Haupt made this handsome and completely functional rotary cellphone. Her design is open-source and you can even buy a case kit from her company, Sky's Edge Robotics. You have to find and carefully modify your own rotary dial, though -- they're apparently no longer made -- as well as a few other components.

Librem 5: Full Screen, Power and New Recruit

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets

  • Better Fullscreen App Support on the Librem 5

    The phone’s shell is responsible for how apps are displayed. Even the smallest improvement to how apps render can have a positive impact on all Librem 5 applications – enabling more of the rich application ecosystem in PureOS to work better on mobile.

    [...]

    The UI is still accessible whenever it’s needed, but it’s now smart enough to know when to get out of the way.

    For non-convergent desktop apps you can employ UI scaling, which will allow you to run most FOSS apps on the Librem 5 in non-docked mode.

  • Librem 5 Power Management Improvements up to Jan 2020

    Power-management improvements continue to find their way into PureOS. We still have a ways to go before the battery can make it through a day, but progress is steady. Let’s go over a few of the latest changes.

  • Julian Sparber: Joining Purism

    This announcement is long overdue, but better late than never Smile

    About 6 months ago I joined Purism, where I’m working on the Librem 5 phone. I’m in good company, since there are already a number of other fellow GNOME friends on the Librem 5 team, including Adrien Plazas, Tobias Bernard, and Mohammed Sadiq.

Devices: Librem 5, USB, SB Servo, and Raspberry Pi/OSMC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets
  • Librem 5 Gyro and Ambient Light Sensor Progress

    The software stack around sensors is coming together piece by piece. It will take longer for features like auto-rotate to start working, but the raw data is there and ready to be used by PureOS and software developers.

  • USB armory Mk II: A secure computer on a USB stick featuring open source hardware design

    The hardware security professionals at F-Secure have created a new version of the USB armory – a computer on a USB stick built from the ground up to be secure.

  • SB Servo is a powerful open source digital serial servo motor

    SB Servo motors have been created to offer affordable, powerful and open-source digital servo motors with Torque, Speed, Position Feedback and full 360-degree rotation mode. Early bird pricing starts from £10 and deliveries are expected to start next month during March 2020.

  • OSMC Skin update

    While we usually release a single monthly update, we've made a number of improvements to the OSMC skin and would like to get these changes out as promptly as possible for feedback.

    [...]

    To get the latest and greatest version of OSMC, simply head to My OSMC -> Updater and check for updates manually on your exising OSMC set up. Of course — if you have updates scheduled automatically you should receive an update notification shortly.

    If you enjoy OSMC, please follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook and consider making a donation if you would like to support further development.

    You may also wish to check out our Store, which offers a wide variety of high quality products which will help you get the best of OSMC.

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Arm Officially Supports Panfrost Open-Source Mali GPU Driver Development

Most GPU drivers found in Arm processors are known to be closed-source making it difficult and time-consuming to fix some of the bugs since everybody needs to rely on the silicon vendor to fix those for them, and they may even decide a particular bug is not important to them, so you’d be out of luck. So the developer community has long tried to reverse-engineer GPU drivers with projects like Freedreno (Qualcomm Adreno), Etnaviv (Vivante), as well as Lima and Panfrost for Arm Mali GPUs. Several years ago, Arm management was not interested at all collaborating with open-source GPU driver development for Mali GPUs, but as noted by Phoronix, Alyssa Rosenzweig, a graphics software engineer employed by Collabora, explained Panfrost development was now done in partnership with Arm during a talk at the annual X.Org Developers’ Conference (XDC 2020). Read more

Open Up: Open Source Hardware — A Chat with Carl

From a broader lens, to produce “open source hardware” means that we have developed and shared the recipe to create a high-end commercial product that can be learned from, adapted, and used by anyone else. In the same way we’ve stood on the shoulders of the Linux and open source software giants who came before us, we now get to be pioneers in developing open source hardware for those who come next. If you want to learn more how a computer is designed or how something is made, our schematics are the instructions for how to do it. It describes every step of the process, from each piece of the machine and its dimensions, to the type of aluminum used and how to bend it. It’s similar to open source software in that you can learn from the product, adapt it to your needs, and distribute it. The difference is that it requires outside equipment to produce your own version. Open hardware has become more accessible with 3-D printing, but as we found when we were making acrylic prototypes of Thelio, you reach a point where it’s time to work with metal, which presents its own challenges. You have to cut it, bend it, and paint it, all of which requires specific equipment. Read more

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