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Gadgets

Six Linux home automation clicks

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Linux
Gadgets

Long before people were talking about the Internet of Things, Linux-based home automation systems were available. Here are some of today's most interesting Linux-powered home gadgets.

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Chumby back from the dead with 1,000 apps

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Linux
Gadgets

Chumby, which sold Linux-based tabletop devices that ran Flash-based apps, is back in business under Blue Octy, with an overhauled website and 1,000 apps.

Chumby Industries went out of business a year ago, leaving Chumby owners and subscribers in the lurch. Blue Octy LLC, quickly snatched up the assets and revamped the website. As reported first by Engadget, the company has now reopened the Chumby service.

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BrickPi Bookreader 2 interview

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Linux
Interviews
Gadgets

A robotic, mechanical reader of printed books that melds together the Raspberry Pi and Lego Mindstorms.

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Android Wear review: the everything inbox

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Android
Gadgets

It's not just email either, though it tends to take the brunt of everybody's anger. There are dozens of apps sending us hundreds of notifications; managing all that incoming information is a genuine hassle. Looking at the notification center on our phones, it's hard not to imagine some harried, 1930s office worker. His tie is loosened, sleeves rolled up, sweat beading on his forehead underneath a green visor as he looks at the metal tray marked "INBOX" on his desk. It's piled high with a stack of paper, sent to him from people he doesn't know and doesn't love.

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The Samsung Galaxy Z: Tizen OS a big Risk? Specifications and Comparison

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Linux
Gadgets

The Samsung Galaxy Z is the wave of the future. It’s Tizen OS is cutting edge and will be the standard for smartphones in the future. It is a quality phone that is worth every penny.

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Smartwatch Battle: Pebble Steel vs. Galaxy Gear 2

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Android
Gadgets

Before Google comes in with its own smartwatches, consumers have two mainstream devices to choose from. On one hand, there is the Galaxy Gear 2, coming from a reputed brand like Samsung and there's Pebble Steel by Pebble Technology Corporation that gained popularity after a successful Kickstarter funding campaign for their first watch.

When we consider the turf of wearable devices, there's nothing much to boast of, except, of course, Google Glass. Apart from Pebble and Gear, the tech industry is impatiently waiting for the Motorola smartwatch, which will be made in collaboration with Google. The wait, however, doesn't have to be this hard. If you are someone who wants to get their hands on a smartwatch right now, both the Pebble and the Gear 2 are excellent choices. Both have their own merits, and also their own demerits. But then, which to choose between the two? Well, that's why we are here. In this article, we'll be doing a quick comparison between the Pebble Steel smartwatch and the Galaxy Gear 2. Let's see who wins.

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Rugged, shape-shifting handheld runs Android

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Android
Gadgets

Motorola Solutions unveiled a rugged, enterprise handheld that runs Android 4.1, 1D or 2D scanning, and offers a choice of brick, gun, or turret styles.

When Motorola split into Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions back in 2011, Motorola Mobility was supposed to be the Android company and Motorola Solutions the Windows company. Yet, the latter, which produces a range of enterprise solutions including 4G wireless equipment, has done quite well with its Android-ready enterprise handhelds.

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This is the Gear Live, Samsung's $199 Android Wear Smartwatch

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Android
Gadgets

Wearables were everywhere today at Google I/O, but there was only one truly new product announced: the Galaxy Live, Samsung's Android Wear-running smartwatch. And we've had a chance to spend a few minutes playing with a demo unit — it's only able to do a few things right now, but we have our best sense yet of what Android Wear hardware and software will look like. This is one of the key devices for Android Wear, one of the watches being given to all attendees of the conference, and at first glance it's quite nice.

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Nest Labs buys Dropcam, gains Linux-based cams

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Linux
Gadgets

Nest Labs is buying Dropcam for $555 million, and will integrate Dropcam’s Linux-based surveillance cameras into its own Linux-based home automation system.

Nest’s deal to acquire Dropcam for $555 million was revealed by Recode and confirmed in a Nest blog post by co-founder Matt Rogers. The acquisition follows Nest’s own acquisition by Google for $3.2 billion, announced back in January.

The home surveillance company’s Linux-based cameras will be integrated within Nest’s own Linux-based product line, including a smart thermostat and smoke detector (see farther below). The Dropcam team will move from San Francisco to Nest’s offices in Palo Alto.

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Samsung to unveil its Android Wear Smart watch at Google I/O next week

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Android
Linux
Gadgets

Samsung has released a Tizen smart watch in the form of the Samsung Gear 2, but now, according to sources in CNET, the korean hardware manufacturer is due to launch their own Android wear offering next week at Google’s developer conference, Google I/O.

So why release Tizen and Android? Being a Tizen site we would prefer dearest Samsung to only release Tizen from now till the end of time, but the fact is that Android and Android ware is an immediate revenue stream that Samsung does not want to miss out on.

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More in Tux Machines

Events: LibOCon, CHAOSScon, SUSE in Paris, Open Networking & Edge Summit North America 2020

  • LibreOffice Conference 2021 Call for Locations

    Once a year, the LibreOffice Community gathers for a global community event: the LibreOffice Conference, or LibOCon. After a series of successful events – Paris, October 2011; Berlin, October 2012; Milan, September 2013; Bern, September 2014; Aarhus, September 2015; Brno, September 2016; Rome, October 2017; Tirana, September 2018 and Almeria, September 2019 – the venue for 2020 is Nuremberg, Germany. To ease the organization, TDF Board of Directors has decided to open the call for location for 2021 earlier this year, to give the 2021 event organizers the opportunity of attending the conference in Nurembers in October 2020. The LibreOffice Conference takes place between September and November, with a preference for September. The deadline for sending in proposals is June 30, 2019. After receiving the applications, we will evaluate if all pre-conditions have been met and the overall content of the proposal, and give all applicants a chance to answer questions and clarify details if needed.

  • CHAOSScon EU 2020: play by play

    This is my second time attending CHAOSScon. I attended on behalf of RIT LibreCorps to represent our engagement with the UNICEF Office of Innovation and the Innovation Fund. For CHAOSScon EU 2020, I arrived hoping to learn more about effective metric collection strategies for open source communities and also get a deeper understanding of the technology behind GrimoireLab.

  • When in Paris, learn how SUSE empowers DevOps teams with HPE

    We will be there (Booth #21) to meet with Presales Consultants and Solution Architects from both HPE and Partners and chat about how we are working with HPE to deliver software-defined infrastructure with an open approach.

  • Keynote Speakers Announced For Open Networking & Edge Summit North America 2020

    The open networking event has now been expanded to cover Edge Computing, Edge Cloud and IoT. The event focuses on collaborative development and innovation across enterprises, service providers/telcos and cloud providers to shape the future of networking and edge computing with a deep focus on technical, architectural and business discussions in the areas of Open Networking & AI/ML-enabled use cases.

today's howtos

Programming: OpenXR, Fuchsia OS, Prolog and State of 'DevOps'

  • Open source XR runtime (VR/AR) 'Monado' sees a first release

    With the Khronos Group launching the OpenXR specification last year, their aim was to unify Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) development while Collabora worked on their open source implementation of Monado. Collabora have been hard at work on Monado, a currently Linux-focused open source XR runtime that will eventually also support other platforms. Today, they tagged the very first release. With this release they've worked in new drivers, there's now a set of scripts ready for people to try Monado rather than needing to setup a full development environment, udev rules sorted for USB permissions for XR hardware, distribution packaging and more. You can see the release announcement on the Collabora blog, where they note they also have some internships going. As for the code, it's all up on GitLab if you're interested in checking out in this early form. The future of XR on Linux sounds quite exciting, especially with efforts like this and Collabora do some great open source work.

  • Monado OpenXR runtime developer update

    We are very happy to tag version 0.1 of the Monado OpenXR runtime for Linux! Ever since announcing the project at GDC 2019, we have been working on improving the full open source XR stack to a usable state. Do keep in mind, this is a first tag, not a final release so it will contain some tinkering and is not feature complete! To echo the common phrase 'Be warned, here be dragons!'. Feel free to play around with Monado, and hit us up on our Discord to get help, report bugs or ask about contributing!

  • Google programming language scorecard: How C, C++, Dart, Rust, Go rate for Fuchsia

    Google has released a new programming language policy for Fuchsia, its under-development OS that some speculate could be its non-Linux successor to Android. Instead of a Linux kernel, the core of Google's Fuchsia OS is a Zircon microkernel to communicate with hardware and boot a system that runs Fuchsia. Google describes Fuchsia as specifically "not Linux" and a "modular, capability-based operating system".

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Prolog

    Prolog is a general purpose, declarative, logic programming language, often associated with artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, intelligent database retrieval, and problem solving. It’s widely used in research and education for natural language processing. Automatic backtracking is one of the most characteristic features of Prolog. It’s a form of searching, fundamental to all artificial intelligence techniques. Prolog also supports multi-directional reasoning; arguments to a procedure can freely be designated inputs and outputs in different ways in different procedure calls. This is a powerful theorem-proving technique. Another key feature of Prolog is that its syntax and semantics are closer to formal logic than say Lisp. Prolog is generally regarded as a difficult language to get to grips with. But learning the fundamentals of Prolog is definitely worthwhile.

  • State of DevOps Report Finds Maturity Varies Widely by Industry

    The scorecard gave the technology industry an "A" for DevOps adoption and an "A-" for security integration as part of the DevOps development pipeline. Brown noted that it was expected that companies in the technology industry would be leading the pack in terms of security integration because DevOps tends to be part of the DNA of those organizations.

Security, FUD, Openwashing and Threats

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (curl and otrs2), Fedora (NetworkManager-ssh and python-psutil), Mageia (ipmitool, libgd, libxml2_2, nextcloud, radare2, and upx), openSUSE (inn and sudo), Oracle (kernel, ksh, python-pillow, and thunderbird), Red Hat (curl, kernel, nodejs:10, nodejs:12, procps-ng, rh-nodejs10-nodejs, ruby, and systemd), SUSE (dpdk, firefox, java-1_7_1-ibm, java-1_8_0-ibm, libexif, libvpx, nodejs10, nodejs8, openssl1, pdsh, slurm_18_08, python-azure-agent, python3, and webkit2gtk3), and Ubuntu (libapache2-mod-auth-mellon, libpam-radius-auth, and rsync).

  • New Critical RCE Bug in OpenBSD SMTP Server Threatens Linux Distros [Ed: Typical FUD associating "Linux" with a package that GNU/Linux distros do not come with]

    Security researchers have discovered a new critical vulnerability in the OpenSMTPD email server. An attacker could exploit it remotely to run shell commands as root on the underlying operating system.

  • New OpenSMTPD RCE Flaw Affects Linux and OpenBSD Email Servers [Ed: Again attributing to operating systems bugs in pertinent packages they may not even have]

    OpenSMTPD has been found vulnerable to yet another critical vulnerability that could allow remote attackers to take complete control over email servers running BSD or Linux operating systems. OpenSMTPD, also known as OpenBSD SMTP Server, is an open-source implementation of the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) to deliver messages on a local machine or to relay them to other SMTP servers. It was initially developed as part of the OpenBSD project but now comes pre-installed on many UNIX-based systems.

  • Y2K bug has a 2020 echo

    The New Scientist reports on problems with software caused by an echo of the Y2K bug that had every excited in the late 1990s. It turns out one of the fixes then was to kick various software cans down the road to 2020. In theory that gave people 20 years to find long term answers to the problems. In some cases they might have expected software refreshes to have solved the issue. [...] This happens because Unix time started on January 1 1970. Time since then is stored as a 32-bit integer. On January 19 2038, that integer will overflow. Most modern applications and operating systems have been patched to fix this although there are some compatibility problems. The real issue comes with embedded hardware, think of things like medical devices, which will need replacing some time in the next 18 years.

  • The “Cloud Snooper” malware that sneaks into your Linux servers [Ed: They don't want to mention that people actually need to install this malware on GNU/Linux for dangers to become viable. Typical Sophos FUD/sales.]
  • Cybersecurity alliance launches first open source messaging framework for security tools [Ed: Openwash of proprietary software firms]

    Launched by the Open Cybersecurity Alliance (OCA), a consortium of cybersecurity vendors including IBM, Crowdstrike, and McAfee, on Monday, the OCA said that OpenDXL Ontology is the "first open source language for connecting cybersecurity tools through a common messaging framework."

  • Microsoft uses its expertise in malware to help with fileless attack detection on Linux [Ed: Truly laughable stuff as Microsoft specialises in adding back doors, then abusing those who speak about it]
  • Azure Sphere, Microsoft's Linux-Powered IoT Security Service, Launches [Ed: Microsoft is Googlebombing "Linux" again; you search for Linux news, you get Microsoft Azure (surveillance) and proprietary malware, instead.]