Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gadgets

Ubuntu Touch OTA-5

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets
  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5

    Right on the heels of UBport's OTA-4 release comes the official 16.04 version of Ubuntu Touch for mobile devices. This will be the fifth Over The Air update (OTA-5), and it will also be the first of many updates that now adhere to a regular release roadmap.

    While many have already joined the community on 16.04 with OTA-4, in addition to the long-term support of upstream Ubuntu development, OTA-5 will include a more stable experience, new tweaks, and new features to show off this next stage of Ubuntu Touch development.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Is Being Prepped With New Browser, Qt Auto Scaling

    The UBports community that continues to maintain Ubuntu Touch for a range of mobile devices will soon be rolling out Ubuntu Touch OTA-5.

    Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 is bringing its new "Morph" web-browser powered by Qt WebEngine to replace the old Oxide-based browser application, support for Qt automatic scaling, Kirigami 2 support, and new community artwork.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 Is Out for Ubuntu Phones with New Morph Browser, Improvements

    The UBports community announced today that they begin work on the next OTA (Over-the-Air) update for the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system for Ubuntu Phone devices.

    With the Ubuntu Touch OTA-4 finally rebasing the mobile OS on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series, the UBports team can now concentrate their efforts on bringing more new features and improvements, which will land in the upcoming Ubuntu Touch OTA-5 release.

    "While many have already joined the community on 16.04 with OTA-4, in addition to the long-term support of upstream Ubuntu development, OTA-5 will include a more stable experience, new tweaks, and new features to show off this next stage of Ubuntu Touch," reads today's announcement.

Linux users want (and deserve) shiny things too

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Nokia’s adventures and misadventures in Linux land inspired and gave birth to a few similar attempts, both from commercial for-profit companies and from open source communities. Just as the Nokia N800 was making rounds in tech circles, the Openmoko project was already trying to rally the open source community around the ideals of open source software as well as open source hardware. While it did generate a lot more interest within the community, it didn’t have the coffers that allowed Nokia to throw money at the Maemo platform, at least for a while.

And then the Nokia that we knew was no more. Out of its ashes rose Finnish startup Jolla, who picked up the pieces that Nokia left, like Mer, the abandoned lovechild of Nokia’s Maemo and Intel’s MeeGo. It almost seemed like Jolla and its Sailfish OS would be able to carry on that legacy. Unfortunately, Jolla’s good fortune didn’t last that long.

From Maemo to Openmoko to Mer, many of the Linux-based mobile platform built their GUIs around the GTK+ toolkit and, to some extent, the GNOME desktop environment libraries. The version of Maemo in the Nokia N9 as well as Sailfish OS would use the competing Qt toolkit, which Nokia received when it acquired Trolltech and eventually lost when it itself got bought by Microsoft. Partly inspired by these trends, the KDE community started their own mobile efforts through the Plasma Active project. But while its ill-fated Vivaldi tablet never saw the light of day, Plasma Active would eventually mature into Plasma Mobile and strike its own path, independent of a specific, self-designed device.

Read more

Sailfish 3 is at your doorstep

Filed under
Gadgets

Rolling out Sailfish 3 this autumn has been our biggest objective this year and we’re happy to report the latest status. It’s time for an update and awaited schedule news.

As we mentioned already in our original Sailfish 3 announcement in Mobile World Congress back in February, Sailfish 3 is a result of rigorous development work done together with Jolla’s licensing partners and the Sailfish community over the course of 2017-2018 – thanks to all of you for the cooperation and contributions! The third generation of our operating system will have clear new benefits for all of its users, be it corporate licensing customers, our developer community members, or daily Sailfish users.

Jolla has always embraced the methodology of continuous development and continuous releases, and Sailfish 3 is no exception. Sailfish 3 is rolled out in phases, and in fact, our latest software update Nurmonjoki already included a few of the new features. Albeit perhaps more relevant for the corporate customers, those still have belonged to our Sailfish 3 list all the time. These items included e.g. VPN improvements and MDM (Mobile Device Management) functionalities.

Read more

Sailfish OS "Nurmonjoki" Released and Eelo Beta

Filed under
OS
Gadgets
  • Sailfish OS Nurmonjoki is now available

    After a very warm summer here in Northern Europe, many well deserved holidays are taken and many sailors are now rested after a year of full-on work. Sailors that were on duty during the summer have however worked on the latest iteration of Sailfish OS updates for our beloved community! After much developing and testing, we are now ready to release Sailfish OS 2.2.1. Sailfish OS 2.2.1 is named after the river Nurmonjoki which is located 300km north of Helsinki, on south western part of Finland.

  • Sailfish OS "Nurmonjoki" Released For GDPR Compliance, App Updates

    While Jolla's Linux-based Sailfish OS mobile operating system hasn't turned out to be as great as many anticipated, today the Finnish company released Sailfish OS 2.2.1 under the Nurmonjoki codename.

  • /e/ first beta soon to be released

    Next week, on Tuesday or Wednesday, we will release the first beta of /e/ mobile OS.

    I will then describe choices that have been done, what’s in, what’s not in, what remains to do, what to test and how. And probably a challenge for testers.

    [...]

    Of course we cannot support the 17K+ known Android devices. As the /e/ ROM itself is forked from LineageOS we can build for all LOS 14.1 (Android Nougat) supported devices, and not yet for LOS 15 (Android Oreo) supported devices (work in progress).

ZeroPhone Is “Coming Soon”: A Raspberry Pi-Based, Linux-Powered Phone For Just $50

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

With data security and privacy becoming an alarming issue while dealing with the data-hungry companies, ZeroPhone seems like a sigh of relief.

ZeroPhone is a Raspberry Pi-based, open-source, Linux-powered handset that has been launched as a project on Crowd Supply; we’ve already told you about the phone in the past. The device promises no carrier locks, no pre-loaded apps and good riddance from harvesting of data without users’ knowledge.

Read more

Devices Leftovers

Filed under
Android
Gadgets
  • Rugged, in-vehicle touch-panel PCs support camera and wireless expansion

    The VMC touch-panel PCs are designed for in-vehicle use in warehouses, ports, and other logistic and material applications. The systems support -30 to 60°C temperatures with ambient air flow and offer 10% to 90% (non-condensing) humidity tolerance. Vibration resistance is rated at MIL-STD-810G, 514.6 Procedure 1, Category 4, and shock resistance complies with MIL-STD-810G, Method 516.6, Procedure I and V (crash hazard), says Nexcom.

  • Let’s get Chatty!

    Today we provide a technical update and demonstration of SMS and end-to-end encrypted XMPP messages on the chat application we’re developing, Chatty. But first, a bit of historical context…

  • Purism Developing "Chatty" For SMS Support On The Librem 5

    Purism shared today about the work they are engaged in on supporting SMS messaging with their in-development Librem 5 smartphone.

    For handling SMS messaging, Purism is developing an application they -- at least for now -- are calling Chatty. This Chatty code will effectively serve as a plug-in for libpurple (of Pidgin instant messaging fame) that interfaces with ModemManager. Libpurple of course supports many different messaging platforms/protocols and is most often associated with Pidgin but could be adapted by other clients.

  • Skagen Falster 2 fitness smartwatch announced – Runs Wear OS

    The International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), which usually takes places in Las Vegas, is a place that many tech companies showcase their upcoming consumer electronics technologies. Tech breakthroughs have been experienced there since June 1967 (wow). This year at CES 2018, Skagen announced their first smartwatch – called the Falster. It was an admirable watch but did have some drawbacks, such as the poor battery life and some missing features. Now, several months later, the company is in the process of already releasing the Falster 2 and it starts shipping on September 12th. You can expect it soon.

    [...]

    Although this all may sound great, the Falster 2 is still powered by the quite old Snapdragon Wear 2100 chip and will become outdated pretty soon. If you’re still interested in buying the watch regardless, you can buy it at Skagen’s very own site. The silicone and leather band types cost $275 while the steel-mesh ones cost that little more at $295.

  • Xiaomi Poco F1 Launcher Arrives On Google Play Store

Devices: Tizen, OpenZWave, and Ibase

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets
  • Samsung Galaxy Watch, Running Tizen, is Launched

    Today, as expected, Samsung have launched a new smartwatch, the Samsung Galaxy Watch, yes, the name change is real (previously it has been known as the Gear S4). At the Samsung Unpacked event, we were given the Note 9 and the Galaxy Watch. The big headline for us is the watch will not be running Wear OS, as speculated once upon a time, but the Galaxy Watch will be running Tizen 4.0.

    We will have two models to choose from: 46mm available in silver and a 42mm black and rose gold versions. Samsung have realised that “one size does not fit all” and some might find a smaller watch face appealing.

  • Building a better thermostat with Home Assistant

    Next, I needed to look at software to use my hardware acquisitions as a thermostat. While all my devices were Z-Wave, and OpenZWave provides both C++ and Python interfaces I could use to access and control my devices, it was a bit too low-level for my taste.

    Instead, I decided to use the Home Assistant project, for a few reasons. First, I know a bunch of people who use it, hack on it, or both. Second, while all my current devices are Z-Wave, Home Assistant will let me branch out to use other kinds of devices if I want. Home Assistant supports a ton of different devices and services—you can look at the component list to see them all. For Z-Wave support, it leverages OpenZWave and provides a higher level interface that is a bit easier to deal with. Home Assistant is written in Python 3, which is very convenient for me since I do most of my programming in Python. It also has an active community that has been responsive and helpful.

    I installed Home Assistant on one of my servers and proceeded to configure its interface with my devices. There is a lot of detailed information available on setting up Home Assistant—you can refer to the official documentation for a starting point. For specific Z-Wave instructions, see the Z-Wave section in the Home Assistant docs.

    After setting up Home Assistant, I had a single web interface and API for controlling my new power switches and displaying data from the MultiSensor. But, I still didn't have a thermostat—just a pretty interface (that I could use remotely) for manually turning the AC on or off.

  • IP65 protected panel PCs feature Apollo Lake or Core-U chips

    Ibase announced three open-frame panel PCs with Linux support. The 15-inch, 1024 x 768 OFP-151-PC and 21-inch, 1920 x 1080 OFP-2100-PC run on the Pentium N4200 while the 21-inch OFP-2101-PC offers a choice of 7th Gen Core-U CPUs.

    Ibase, which last year launched an SE-102-N signage player, has now returned with a pair of fanless, open-frame touch-panel PCs that similarly run Linux 4.x or Windows 10 on an Intel Apollo Lake SoC. The 15-inch, 1024 x 768 OFP-151-PC and 21-inch, 1920 x 1080 OFP-2100-PC ship with a quad-core, 1.1/2.5GHz Pentium N4200 with 6W TDP.

ZX Spectrum Vega+ blows a FUSE: It runs open-source emulator

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets

The ZX Spectrum Vega+ is running open-source Spectrum emulator software FUSE, The Register has confirmed while carrying out a hands-on review of the handheld console.

As regular readers know, the Vega+ is the flagship product of Retro Computers Ltd, the company which took £513,000 in crowdfunded cash from members of the public to produce handheld ZX Spectrum-themed gaming consoles. It failed to deliver any for two years and then belatedly emitted what appear to be several dozen of the devices last week.

With public interest at an all-time high in what the company has actually produced during the ongoing scandal, El Reg acquired one from an RCL customer for review purposes.

No instructions were supplied with the console. In time-honoured retro gaming fashion, The Register’s crack review team resorted to button-mashing to figure out what did what.

Read more

Galaxy Watch will run Tizen 4.0

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

In May, Samsung trademarked the “Galaxy Watch” and “Galaxy Fit” monikers at the USPTO, suggesting its plan to bring its wearables under the Galaxy branding. Now two months later, SamMobile confirms that Samsung’s next smartwatch, the successor to the Gear S3, will indeed be called the Galaxy Watch, and not Gear S4. Furthermore, they add that the upcoming Galaxy Watch will run Tizen 4.0 out of the box.

Read more

Nintendo Found a Way to Patch an Unpatchable Coldboot Exploit in Nintendo Switch

Filed under
Security
Gadgets

If you plan on buying a Nintendo Switch gaming console to run Linux on it using the "unpatchable" exploit publicly disclosed a few months ago, think again because Nintendo reportedly fixed the security hole.

Not long ago, a team of hackers calling themselves ReSwitched publicly disclosed a security vulnerability in the Nvidia Tegra X1 chip, which they called Fusée Gelée and could allow anyone to hack a Nintendo Switch gaming console to install a Linux-based operating system and run homebrew code and apps using a simple trick.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS/Microsoft Openwashing Leftovers

Brave and Firefox Latest

  • Brave Browser Team Up With Tor
     

    TOR [sic] or The Onion Router uses technology that separates your computer from the website you’re viewing by routing the network traffic through 3 seperate servers before it reaches your computer. That being said Brave Core Beta hasn’t been fully tested yet so “users should not rely on it for serious use just yet,” Brave said.

  •  
  • Your RSS is grass: Mozilla euthanizes feed reader, Atom code in Firefox browser, claims it's old and unloved
    When Firefox 64 arrives in December, support for RSS, the once celebrated content syndication scheme, and its sibling, Atom, will be missing. "After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product," said Gijs Kruitbosch, a software engineer who works on Firefox at Mozilla, in a blog post on Thursday. RSS – which stands for Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Really Simple Syndication, as you see fit – is an XML-based format for publishing and subscribing to web content feeds. It dates back to 1999 and for a time was rather popular, but been disappearing from a variety of applications and services since then. Mozilla appears to have gotten the wrecking ball rolling in 2011 when it removed the RSS button from Firefox. The explanation then was the same as it is now: It's just not very popular.
  • Cameron Kaiser: It's baaaaa-aaack: TenFourFox Intel
    It's back! It's undead! It's ugly! It's possibly functional! It's totally unsupported! It's ... TenFourFox for Intel Macs! Years ago as readers of this blog will recall, Claudio Leite built TenFourFox 17.0.2 for Intel, which the update check-in server shows some determined users are still running to this day on 10.5 and even 10.4 despite various problems such as issue 209. However, he didn't have time to maintain it, and a newer version was never built, though a few people since then have made various attempts and submitted some patches. One of these attempts is now far enough along to the point where I'm permitted to announce its existence. Riccardo Mottola has done substantial work on getting TenFourFox to build and run again on old Intel Macs with a focus on 32-bit compatibility, and his patches have been silently lurking in the source code repository for some time. Along with Ken Cunningham's additional work, who now also has a MacPorts portfile so you can build it yourself (PowerPC support in the portfile is coming, though you can still use the official instructions, of course), enough functions in the new Intel build that it can be used for basic tasks.

Security: 'Smart' Locks, Windows in Weapons

Android Leftovers